Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute

Puławy, Poland

Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute

Puławy, Poland

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Krasuska E.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | Faber A.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | Pudelko R.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | Jarosz Z.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment | Year: 2013

Corn (maize) is one of the main raw materials for ethanol production in the European Union. Among agricultural feedstock dedicated for biofuels, it is put under regulation in terms of greenhouse gas emission in the life cycle of ethanol production. This study is focused on corn cultivation in Poland and the possibilities to mitigate the greenhouse gas emission at the stage of crop cultivation. The main opportunities come from N fertilization optimization (rates and assortment) as well from increase in soil organic carbon sequestration by improving crop management (reduced tillage and no-tillage). The results show that ethanol produced from conventional tillage corn cultivation, including typical GHG emissions from N fertilizer production, guarantee the at least 35% greenhouse gas savings to petrol as fossil fuel reference. Moreover, the future required life cycle GHG emission savings of 50-60% for corn based ethanol production shall be reached in Poland if applying reduced and no-tillage cultivation of corn.


Krasuska E.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | Pudelko R.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | Faber A.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | Jarosz Z.,Institute for Soil Science and Plant Cultivation State Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment | Year: 2013

Biofuel producers are obligated to achieve certain level of greenhouse gas emission (GHG) reduction in the lifecycle of biofuels in reference to fossil fuels. The current emission reduction level is at least 35% and will increase up to 50% since January 2017 for the existing plants and at least to 60% for a new installations. At the farming stage it is possible to achieve some emission savings in the lifecycle of biofuels with reference to the agricultural feedstock production. In this study GHG emission optimization was investigated with regard to winter wheat yield and N fertilization rate while considering bioethanol production. Using desirability of optimization, risk analysis and uncertainty assessment, it was proved that the GHG emission attributed to winter wheat cultivation can be reduced by 1.7 g CO2 eq. MJ-1 of ethanol produced. This can be achieved primarily with yield increase by 7.9% compared to the median, while changes in N fertilization is of less importance. By selecting winter wheat from farms producing higher yields (5,200-6,929 t ha-1) it is possible to decrease the uncertainty regarding the GHG emissions from 2% to 1%.

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