Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging

Troina, Italy

Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging

Troina, Italy

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Pizza F.,University of Bologna | Pizza F.,IRCCS Institute of the Neurological science | Ferri R.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Vandi S.,University of Bologna | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Neurology | Year: 2017

Background and purpose: The sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) period (SOREMP), the hallmark of narcolepsy, may be a specific state and not the simple anticipation of REM sleep. Methods: We analyzed the electroencephalographic spectral content in untreated patients with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) during the sleep-onset period (SOP) and during nocturnal REM sleep in two consecutive nocturnal recordings from 31 patients with NT1 (mean age 34 ± 15 years, 18 males) and a single nocturnal recording from 36 controls (mean age 38 ± 13 years, 21 males). The SOP was defined as the first 10 min starting at the beginning of the first epoch of any sleep stage, and further divided into two consecutive 5-min periods (SOP-1 and SOP-2); 1 min of artifact-free quiet wakefulness after lights-off was identified as well as 5 min of REM sleep in the middle of the night and another 5 min during the last REM sleep period. Electroencephalographic spectral analysis was performed using the C3/A2 channel. Results: The SOP-1 and, more strikingly, SOP-2 had significantly less delta and sigma activity in patients with NT1 in the SOREMP condition versus both controls and patients with NT1 without SOREMP. SOP-2 also showed less theta and alpha activity. Conversely, sigma and beta activity were more represented during SOREMP compared with the nocturnal REM period in patients with NT1. Conclusions: The analysis of the SOP supports the concept that SOREMP is a different state compared with both nocturnal REM sleep and non-REM sleep onset. © 2016 EAN


Svetnik V.,Merck And Co. | Ferri R.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Ray S.,Merck And Co. | Ma J.,Merck And Co. | And 5 more authors.
Sleep | Year: 2010

Objective: To evaluate cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) in a phase advance model of transient insomnia and the effects of gaboxadol and zolpidem. Design: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over study in which habitual sleep time was advanced by 4 h. Setting: 6 sleep research laboratories in US Participants: 55 healthy subjects (18-57 y) Interventions: Gaboxadol 15 mg (GBX), zolpidem 10 mg (ZOL), and placebo (PBO). Measurements: Routine polysomnographic (PSG) measures, CAP, spectral power density, and self-reported sleep measures Results: The phase advance model of transient insomnia produced significant changes in CAP parameters. Both GBX and ZOL significantly and differentially modified CAP parameters in the direction of more stable sleep. GBX brought the CAP rate in stage 1 sleep and slow wave sleep (SWS) closer to baseline levels but did not significantly change the CAP rate in stage 2. ZOL reduced the CAP rate in stage 2 to near baseline levels, whereas the CAP rate in stage 1 and SWS was reduced substantially below baseline levels. The CAP parameter A1 index (associated with SWS and sleep continuity) showed the highest correlation with self-reported sleep quality, higher than any traditional PSG, spectral, or other self-reported measures. Conclusion: Disruptions in CAP produced by phase advanced sleep were significantly and differentially modulated by gaboxadol and zolpidem. The relative independence of CAP parameters from other electrophysiological measures of sleep, their high sensitivity to sleep disruption, and their strong association with subjective sleep quality suggest that CAP variables may serve as valuable endpoints in future insomnia research.


Ferri R.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Marelli S.,San Raffaele Scientific Institute | Ferini-Strambi L.,San Raffaele Scientific Institute | Oldani A.,San Raffaele Scientific Institute | And 3 more authors.
Sleep Medicine | Year: 2013

Objective: To analyze the differences in sleep structure and nocturnal motor activity between drug-free REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) patients and those under therapy with clonazepam, and to evaluate the long-term longitudinal changes under continued therapy with clonazepam. Methods: Fifty-seven consecutive iRBD patients were recruited (52 men and 5 women, mean age 68.8 ± 6.03. years). Forty-two patients were not taking any medication at the time of the evaluation (iRBD. - Clo) while 15 were taking clonazepam (0.5-1. mg) at bedtime (iRBD. +. Clo). The Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) scale was obtained. Sleep was video-polysomnographically recorded and the RBD severity scale (RBDSS) obtained. The chin EMG amplitude was quantitatively assessed and the Atonia Index computed. Results: Disease duration was significantly longer in iRBD. +. Clo patients who also showed a lower rate of stage shifts, higher sleep efficiency and lower percentage of wakefulness after sleep onset and of sleep stage 1, and an increased percentage of sleep stage 2. The longitudinal long-term follow up study in a subgroup of 13 patients showed moderately increased total sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep stage 2, slow-wave sleep and decreased wakefulness after sleep onset and sleep stage 1, under clonazepam treatment. The CGI scale clearly tended to improve after treatment, but no common trend was evident for RBDSS or Atonia Index. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of important objective effects of clonazepam on NREM sleep in RBD; this data might be very important for the development of new and effective treatments for this condition. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Ferri R.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Manconi M.,Civic Hospital EOC of Lugano | Arico D.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Punjabi N.M.,Johns Hopkins University | Zucconi M.,San Raffaele Scientific Institute
Sleep Medicine | Year: 2013

Objective: To evaluate whether eliciting repetitive cortical and autonomic arousals during sleep is able to induce the occurrence of periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS). Methods: Fifteen normal subjects underwent one night of uninterrupted and two sequential nights of experimental sleep fragmentation achieved by auditory and mechanical stimuli eliciting frequent EEG arousals. Sleep was polygraphically recorded and subsequently used to determine the frequency of arousals and occurrence of leg movement (LM) activity during the first (baseline) and the second fragmentation night. Also, heart rate variability parameters were obtained to assess the autonomic changes induced by the stimulation. Results: Sleep fragmentation was associated with an increase in the arousal index, percentage of sleep stage 1, and frequency of stage shifts. In addition, there was a decrease in sleep latency and in percentage of slow-wave sleep. Moreover, a significant increase in heart rate variability and especially of its sympathetic component, was also found. In contrast, parameters of the leg movement activity showed no significant change following experimental sleep fragmentation. The lack of an increase in leg movement activity was also observed in one subject who demonstrated PLMS at baseline. Conclusions: Experimental sleep fragmentation is not associated with an increase in PLMS in normal young adults. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging, IRCCS Institute of the Neurological science and University of Bologna
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of neurology | Year: 2016

The sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) period (SOREMP), the hallmark of narcolepsy, may be a specific state and not the simple anticipation of REM sleep.We analyzed the electroencephalographic spectral content in untreated patients with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) during the sleep-onset period (SOP) and during nocturnal REM sleep in two consecutive nocturnal recordings from 31 patients with NT1 (mean age 34 15 years, 18 males) and a single nocturnal recording from 36 controls (mean age 38 13 years, 21 males). The SOP was defined as the first 10 min starting at the beginning of the first epoch of any sleep stage, and further divided into two consecutive 5-min periods (SOP-1 and SOP-2); 1 min of artifact-free quiet wakefulness after lights-off was identified as well as 5 min of REM sleep in the middle of the night and another 5 min during the last REM sleep period. Electroencephalographic spectral analysis was performed using the C3/A2 channel.The SOP-1 and, more strikingly, SOP-2 had significantly less delta and sigma activity in patients with NT1 in the SOREMP condition versus both controls and patients with NT1 without SOREMP. SOP-2 also showed less theta and alpha activity. Conversely, sigma and beta activity were more represented during SOREMP compared with the nocturnal REM period in patients with NT1.The analysis of the SOP supports the concept that SOREMP is a different state compared with both nocturnal REM sleep and non-REM sleep onset.


Salemi M.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Barone C.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Romano C.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Ridolfo F.,University of Milan | And 5 more authors.
Neurological Sciences | Year: 2013

Down syndrome (DS) is a chromosomal disorder caused by chromosome 21 trisomy and is the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability. The gene for the kinesin family member 21A (KIF21A), is a member of the kinesin superfamily involved in the anterograde fast axonal transport. In this study, we have evaluated the possible differential expression of KIF21A mRNA, by qRT-PCR, in peripheral blood leukocytes of DS subjects and it compared with the normal population. In the assumption that changes in KIF21A gene expression levels may affect the axonal transport and the development of the nervous system of subjects with DS. In the present case-control study, KIF21A gene expression was increased in 72.72 % of DS samples compared with normal subjects. This finding suggests that changes in the expression levels of KIF21A in DS subjects may affect the axonal transport and the development of the nervous system. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


PubMed | Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Sleep medicine | Year: 2013

To analyze the differences in sleep structure and nocturnal motor activity between drug-free REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) patients and those under therapy with clonazepam, and to evaluate the long-term longitudinal changes under continued therapy with clonazepam.Fifty-seven consecutive iRBD patients were recruited (52 men and 5 women, mean age 68.86.03years). Forty-two patients were not taking any medication at the time of the evaluation (iRBD-Clo) while 15 were taking clonazepam (0.5-1mg) at bedtime (iRBD+Clo). The Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) scale was obtained. Sleep was video-polysomnographically recorded and the RBD severity scale (RBDSS) obtained. The chin EMG amplitude was quantitatively assessed and the Atonia Index computed.Disease duration was significantly longer in iRBD+Clo patients who also showed a lower rate of stage shifts, higher sleep efficiency and lower percentage of wakefulness after sleep onset and of sleep stage 1, and an increased percentage of sleep stage 2. The longitudinal long-term follow up study in a subgroup of 13 patients showed moderately increased total sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep stage 2, slow-wave sleep and decreased wakefulness after sleep onset and sleep stage 1, under clonazepam treatment. The CGI scale clearly tended to improve after treatment, but no common trend was evident for RBDSS or Atonia Index.This study provides evidence of important objective effects of clonazepam on NREM sleep in RBD; this data might be very important for the development of new and effective treatments for this condition.


PubMed | Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The International journal of biological markers | Year: 2014

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequent cancer among men in many developing countries, and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. A genetic component has been implicated in PCa onset and development. The cerebellar degeneration-related autoantigen 1 (CDR1) gene, mapping in Xq26-q27.2, is expressed in cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, lung, liver, and kidney. In addition, CDR1 expression has been detected in neuroblastoma, renal carcinoma cell lines, and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the expression of the CDR1 gene in the LNCaP and PC-3 PCa cell lines, and in the PNT1A normal prostate cell line. CDR1 mRNA expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR. We found that the CDR1 gene was overexpressed in the LNCaP and PC-3 PCa cell lines as compared with the PNT1A normal prostate cell line. These data suggest that CDR1 could be a new biomarker for PCa identification.


Castiglione R.,University of Catania | Salemi M.,Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging | Vicari L.O.,University of Catania | Vicari E.,University of Catania
Andrologia | Year: 2014

Summary: Changes in levels of oxidative damage products in semen and their relationship to seminal fluid viscosity (SFV) have recently received increasing research interest. We analysed whether SFV was associated with ROS generation, levels of cytokines TNF-alpha (TNF-α), IL-6 and IL-10 and seminal leucocyte concentration, and whether ROS production was related to the extent of infections/inflammations at one (prostatitis) or two (prostato-vesiculitis) male accessory glands. We studied 169 infertile patients, with chronic bacterial prostatitis (PR, n = 74) and/or bilateral prostato-vesiculitis (PV, n = 95), as diagnosed by the ultrasound (US) criteria. Healthy fertile men (n = 42) served as controls. In the PV patient group, SFV, semen characteristics and ROS production had median values that were significantly higher than those found in PR patients and controls, although other sperm variables had values significantly lower than those found in PR patients or controls. In PV infertile patients, ROS generation and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels were higher than those found in PR infertile patients and controls, although seminal IL-10 levels in PV and PR patients were lower than those found in the controls. In PR patients, the levels of SFV were positively related to TNF-α (r = 0.67; P < 0.01), fMLP-stimulated ROS production in the 45% Percoll fraction (r = 0.687, P < 0.01) and the 90% Percoll fraction in basal condition (r = 0.695, P < 0.01), and after fMLP-stimulation (r = 0.688, P < 0.01). Thus, our data indicated that seminal hyperviscosity is associated with increased oxidative stress in infertile men and increased pro-inflammatory interleukins in patients with male accessory gland infection, more when the infection was extended to the seminal vesicles. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


PubMed | Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology | Year: 2013

Down syndrome (DS) is a chromosomal disorder caused by chromosome 21 trisomy and is the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability. The gene for the kinesin family member 21A (KIF21A), is a member of the kinesin superfamily involved in the anterograde fast axonal transport. In this study, we have evaluated the possible differential expression of KIF21A mRNA, by qRT-PCR, in peripheral blood leukocytes of DS subjects and it compared with the normal population. In the assumption that changes in KIF21A gene expression levels may affect the axonal transport and the development of the nervous system of subjects with DS. In the present case-control study, KIF21A gene expression was increased in 72.72 % of DS samples compared with normal subjects. This finding suggests that changes in the expression levels of KIF21A in DS subjects may affect the axonal transport and the development of the nervous system.

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