Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems

Zagreb, Croatia

Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems

Zagreb, Croatia

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Kabas E.,University of Belgrade | Vukojicic S.,University of Belgrade | Alegro A.,University of Zagreb | Surina B.,University of Primorska | And 3 more authors.
Hacquetia | Year: 2014

Phytosociological and numerical analyses of grasslands dominated by Sesleria juncifolia s.l. in Serbia were performed in order to resolve their syntaxonomy and nomenclature. Twelve releves were sampled on Mt. Mučanj (western Serbia), which were then compared with similar releves from other parts of the Balkan Peninsula by means of numerical analyses. The releves were classified using cluster analysis, while the ordination was conducted using Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA). The results suggest the occurrence of two floristically well defined Dinaric associations in Serbia: Seslerio juncifoliae-Edraianthetum graminifolii ass. nova from Mt. Mokra Gora (Oxytropidion urumovii, Elyno-Seslerietea) and Diantho petraeae-Seslerietum juncifoliae ass. nova (Chrysopogono-Saturejion, Festuco-Brometea) from Mt. Mučanj.


PubMed | Petrova 77, World Biodiversity Association onlus, Alagoviceva 21, Institute for research and development of sustainable ecosystems and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2014

A review of the Croatian and Serbian Tetrigidae is given and first records of Tetrix undulata (Sowerby, 1806) for Croatia and Serbia as well as Tetrix tuerki (Krauss, 1876) and Tetrix transsylvanica (Bazyluk & Kis, 1960) comb. nov. for Croatia are presented. The status of the genus Uvarovitettix Bazyluk & Kis, 1960 and the taxonomic position of T. transsylvanica comb. nov. are discussed. The genus Uvarovitettix Bazyluk & Kis, 1960 syn. nov. is synonymised with the genus Tetrix Latreille, 1802. A new subspecies from Croatia and Slovenia, Tetrix transsylvanica hypsocorypha Skejo, 2014 subspecies nova, is described. Tetrix pseudodepressa (Ingrisch, 2006) comb. nov. and Tetrix depressa (Brisout de Barneville, 1848) comb. nov. are moved to the genus Tetrix and the genus Depressotetrix Karaman, 1960 syn. nov. is synonymised with the genus Tetrix. Tetrix gibberosa (Wang & Zheng, 1993) inc. sed. and T. nodulosa (Fieber, 1853) inc. sed. are now considered to be species of uncertain placement within the genus Tetrix. New combination is also given to Paratettix tuberculata (Zheng & Jiang, 1997), primarily placed within the genus Mishtshenkotetrix: Tetrix tuberculata (Zheng & Jiang, 1997) comb. nov., but its placement within the genus Tetrix is also uncertain.


Mitrikeski P.T.,Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems | Mitrikeski P.T.,Ruder Boskovic Institute
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology | Year: 2013

The demonstration of spontaneous yeast competence shows that artificial transformation rests on naturally occurring cellular processes. Such natural competence is either biologically mediated or environmentally induced. For instance, wild yeast might be transformed through conjugation by cell-to-cell contact mediated either by Escherichia coli or Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Moreover, natural competence can be enhanced by mechanical and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, artificial yeast competence is usually achieved by biological, chemical and physical manipulations. These eliminate or weaken natural obstacles blocking the way of the transforming DNA in order to mitigate its entrance into the cell (biological and chemical approach) or simply to bridge it by either electrical or biolistic force (physical). Thus yeast competence is controlled by intrinsic (genetic) and external (environmental) factors. Both intrinsic and external parameters affecting yeast competence were scrutinized leading to the identification of genes and biological processes participating in the phenomenon. Therefore natural yeast competence is a complex, quantitative genetic trait which may have allowed yeast to better adapt over evolutionary times. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Simatovic A.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | Mitrikeski P.T.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | Mitrikeski P.T.,Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems | Vlasic I.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | And 2 more authors.
Research in Microbiology | Year: 2016

In bacteria, the RecA protein forms recombinogenic filaments required for the SOS response and DNA recombination. In order to form a recombinogenic filament, wild type RecA needs to bind ATP and to interact with mediator proteins. The RecA730 protein is a mutant version of RecA with superior catalytic abilities, allowing filament formation without the help of mediator proteins. The mechanism of RecA730 filament formation is not well understood, and the question remains as to whether the RecA730 protein requires ATP binding in order to become competent for filament formation. We examined two mutants, recA730,4159 (presumed to be defective for ATP binding) and recA730,2201 (defective for ATP hydrolysis), and show that they have different properties with respect to SOS induction, conjugational recombination and double-strand break repair. We show that ATP binding is essential for all RecA730 functions, while ATP hydrolysis is required only for double-strand break repair. Our results emphasize the similarity of the SOS response and conjugational recombination, neither of which requires ATP hydrolysis by RecA730. © 2016 Institut Pasteur.


Bergman J.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | Mitrikeski P.T.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | Mitrikeski P.T.,Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems | Brcic-Kostic K.,Ruder Boskovic Institute
Food Technology and Biotechnology | Year: 2015

Sporulation efficiency in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-established model for studying quantitative traits. A variety of genes and nucleotides causing different sporulation efficiencies in laboratory, as well as in wild strains, has already been extensively characterised (mainly by reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and nucleotide exchange methods). We applied a different strategy in order to analyze the variation in sporulation effi- ciency of laboratory yeast strains. Coupling classical quantitative genetic analysis with simulations of phenotypic distributions (a method we call phenotype modelling) enabled us to obtain a detailed picture of the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) relationships underlying the phenotypic variation of this trait. Using this approach, we were able to uncover a dominant epistatic inheritance of loci governing the phenotype. Moreover, a molecular analysis of known causative quantitative trait genes and nucleotides allowed for the detection of novel alleles, potentially responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. Based on the molecular data, we hypothesise that the observed dominant epistatic relationship could be caused by the interaction of multiple quantitative trait nucleotides distributed across a 60- -kb QTL region located on chromosome XIV and the RME1 locus on chromosome VII. Furthermore, we propose a model of molecular pathways which possibly underlie the phenotypic variation of this trait.


Franjevic D.,University of Zagreb | Novosel M.,University of Zagreb | Koletic N.,University of Zagreb | Koletic N.,Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Freshwater and brackish species of bryozoans belong to the Phylactolaemata and Gymnolaemata class. Twelve species of bryozoans were recorded and morphologically determined at eight locations in the Black Sea and the Adriatic basin in Croatia. Twelve species of Bryozoa have been listed in the taxonomic index for Croatia (Conopeum seurati, Lophopus crystallinus Paludicella articulata, Cristatella mucedo, Fredericella sultana, Hyalinella punctata, Plumatella casmiana, Plumatella emarginata, Plumatella fruticosa, Plumatella fungosa, Plumatella geimermassardi and Plumatella repens). For the purposes of gene identification of recorded species, molecular markers for nuclear 18S and 28S genes, ITS2 region and mitochondrial COI gene were amplified. Genetic identifications of morphologically determined bryozoan species were confirmed using highly similar sequences local alignment analysis. Proliferation of freshwater bryozoan species over long distances with the help of the vector animals was confirmed by defining haplotypes on the base of 18S, 28S and ITS2 sequences associated with the Black Sea-Mediterranean waterfowl flyway. Copyright © 2015 Magnolia Press.


Segota V.,Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems | Hrsak V.,University of Zagreb | Alegro A.,University of Zagreb
Natura Croatica | Year: 2012

Cephalanthera damasonium is a mesophilous orchid species common in continental forests in Croatia. In the Mediterranean region, the species comes almost exclusively in sub-Mediterranean deciduous vegetation. So far only four findings in Eumediterranean evergreen vegetation in Croatia are known (Limski kanal, Rab, Lošinj, Šibenik), but are mostly characterized by a strong influence of nearby deciduous vegetation and include a small number of specimens. The island of Mljet is the southernmost finding spot of Cephalanthera damasonium in Croatia. In order to explain this unexpected finding, previous findings in Eumediterranean evergreen vegetation and the ecological requirements of the species are discussed.


This paper represents the first systematic butterfly checklist of the surrounding area of Karlovac. The research into butterfly fauna diversity was carried out during the period 2001-2007. Sixty four butterfly species were recorded. Adding species from literature sources, the total number on check-list rises to 74, representing 37.95% of the butterfly fauna of Croatia. Forty eight butterfly species were recorded for the first time in this area, and ten species from older literature sources need to be confirmed in future surveys. Records of species are noted with sites and dates of findings. Faunistic and biogeographical analyses were made, as well as a short overview of threats, legislative protection and habitat preferences of the species.


Koletic N.,Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems | Novosel M.,University of Zagreb | Rajevic N.,University of Zagreb | Franjevic D.,University of Zagreb
Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2015

Bryozoans are aquatic invertebrates that inhabit all types of aquatic ecosystems. They are small animals that form large colonies by asexual budding. Colonies can reach the size of several tens of centimeters, while individual units within a colony are the size of a few millimeters. Each individual within a colony works as a separate zooid and is genetically identical to each other individual within the same colony. Most freshwater species of bryozoans belong to the Phylactolaemata class, while several species that tolerate brackish water belong to the Gymnolaemata class. Tissue samples for this study were collected in the rivers of Adriatic and Danube basin and in the wetland areas in the continental part of Croatia (Europe). Freshwater and brackish taxons of bryozoans were genetically analyzed for the purpose of creating phylogenetic relationships between freshwater and brackish taxons of the Phylactolaemata and Gymnolaemata classes and determining the role of brackish species in colonizing freshwater and marine ecosystems. Phylogenetic relationships inferred on the genes for 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, COI, and ITS2 region confirmed Phylactolaemata bryozoans as radix bryozoan group. Phylogenetic analysis proved Phylactolaemata bryozoan's close relations with taxons from Phoronida phylum as well as the separation of the Lophopodidae family from other families within the Plumatellida genus. Comparative analysis of existing knowledge about the phylogeny of bryozoans and the expansion of known evolutionary hypotheses is proposed with the model of settlement of marine and freshwater ecosystems by the bryozoans group during their evolutionary past. In this case study, brackish bryozoan taxons represent a link for this ecological phylogenetic hypothesis. Comparison of brackish bryozoan species Lophopus crystallinus and Conopeum seurati confirmed a dual colonization of freshwater ecosystems throughout evolution of this group of animals. Comparative analysis of existing knowledge about the phylogeny of bryozoans and the expansion of known evolutionary hypotheses is proposed with the model of settlement of marine and freshwater ecosystems by the bryozoans group during their evolutionary past. In this case study, brackish bryozoan taxons represent a link for this ecological-phylogenetic hypothesis. Comparison of brackish bryozoan species Lophopus crystallinus and Conopeum seurati confirmed a dual colonization of freshwater ecosystems throughout evolution of this group of animals. © 2015 Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Mitrikeski P.T.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | Mitrikeski P.T.,Institute for Research and Development of Sustainable Ecosystems
Current Microbiology | Year: 2015

Unlike prokaryotes, eukaryotic organisms do not seem to be equipped with natural cell process(es) designated for exogenous DNA uptake. However, it is barely known that under laboratory circumstances resembling wild fungal environment(s), at least some lower eukaryotes could become naturally competent for exogenous DNA uptake. Thus, apart from the known fact that non-manipulated cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae take exogenous DNA by conjugation with certain bacteria, there are also mechanical and physiological mechanisms enabling their transformation under environmental conditions. This clearly shows that lower eukaryotes are amenable to transformation without applying man-made technology (i.e., naturally). However, this topic failed to raise critical scientific interest. Therefore, this review aims to scrutinize the overall implication of the phenomenon stressing its fundamental and applicable importance. It also summarizes all axiomatic laboratory circumstances/vehicles hitherto known to provoke yeast competence naturally and critically discusses plausible mechanisms behind. Possible pathways underlying the phenomenon are emphasized and a unifying model is proposed. This story potentially spans several different research fields, from evolutionary genetics to genetic transformation technology. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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