Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb

Augsburg, Germany

Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb

Augsburg, Germany
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Schober A.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | Musiol J.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | Daub R.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | Feil J.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | Zaeh M.F.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb
Physics Procedia | Year: 2012

Remote fusion cutting represents a promising tool in the field of laser material processing. To further promote the practical application of this process, it is necessary to gain additional know-how concerning the process dynamics. In this contribution an experimental investigation of the cutting front angle is presented. This angle is calculated by evaluating recordings of the process with a high speed camera. Analysis reveals the varying influences of the different process parameters regarding the cutting front angle. Furthermore, a process model based on the achieved results is introduced and discussed. Finally, the relevant findings are summarised and an outlook concerning further investigations is given. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Reinhart G.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Strasser G.,Iwb Application Center Augsburg
Production Engineering | Year: 2011

A high level of cost-intensive manual tasks in the manufacturing process of composite parts impedes a further propagation of those innovative structures in important German industrial branches like the automotive sector or aviation. Especially the handling of semi-finished goods in several key process-chains could not be automated efficiently so far due to a great variety of materials and part contours as well as difficult handling properties of the limp, textile parts. Hence within the presented work a highly-flexible gripper system based on low-vacuum-suction is introduced, which is the result of a methodical investigation in the ideal gripping principle. Special actuators and an intelligent control strategy are combined into a selective gripping technology, which allows an automatic adaption of the pressure based holding force to different contours and materials, by closing certain apertures of a perforated plate. The experimental validation of a realized robotic end-effector shows that the challenging requirements of modern composite production could be fulfilled as the structural integrity of the technical textiles is preserved during the handling processes. © 2011 German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP).


Reinhart G.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | Krug S.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb
Joint 41st International Symposium on Robotics and 6th German Conference on Robotics 2010, ISR/ROBOTIK 2010 | Year: 2010

Fast changing products and processes, accelerated technological development and customised products lead to small lot sizes. This change in production results in the increasing demand for flexible and changeable production and robot systems and thus in reconfiguration efforts. Today, the fast and economic reconfiguration of robot systems states a big challenge. Common reconfiguration processes are characterized by heterogeneous peripheral devices, different programming environments and the need for expert knowledge, thus leading to long commissioning times. In this paper, the dataflow of configuration and reconfiguration processes are analysed at the example of two use cases. On this basis, a classification of the information flow is generated and requirements for automatic reconfigurable systems are derived. Subsequently, a new approach for the easy reconfiguration of robot systems and programming environments is presented. The approach uses a state-model that represents a digital image of the current configuration of the robot system. Combining the aspects of the structure of peripheral components, the information retrieval, the state-model itself and the configuration derivation, a new reconfiguration procedure for industrial robot systems is described.


Zaeh M.F.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Roesch O.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb
International Journal of Automation Technology | Year: 2015

Because of the high flexibility and low investment costs, industrial robots are increasingly being employed for machining processes. However, milling robots can only be used for applications requiring low accuracy and minor cutting forces. The main reason for this is the low static and dynamic stiffness of the robot structure, which lead to huge deflections of the tool and heavy chatter oscillations, especially when steel is being machined. To extend the areas in which milling robots are applied, a model-based controller to compensate for path deviation has been developed at the Institute of Machine Tools and IndustrialManagement of TU Munich (iwb). In addition, process-based strategies to reduce chatter have been analyzed. This paper focuses on the dynamic behavior of robots to increase the stability of the cutting process, but it also gives an overview of the design of the controller for static deviation compensation. © 2015, Fuji Technology Press. All rights reserved.


Ehinger C.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Reinhart G.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb
Production Engineering | Year: 2014

Due to the outstanding material properties the use of carbon fiber reinforced plastics in aerospace applications has grown rapidly during the last years. However, the manual process of creating a preform out of dry cut-outs is still very time-consuming and error-prone and thus limits an efficient use of this technology. Especially the high diversity of variants, the material properties and the complexity of the process limited an automation of the preforming process so far. In this paper an automation system is presented, which consists of a robot-based preforming end-effector and its offline path-planning. The end-effector has a highly modular and flexible design and integrates the three essential functions of the preforming process: gripping, draping and heating. Based on a detailed analysis of the geometric parameters of the preforms and its layers the task-specific layout of the end-effector is conducted. To achieve a preform in high-quality a solution for controlling the end-effector and planning the robot-path is necessary. Hence, a semi-automatic approach is developed, which incorporates the know-how of experts and automatically generates layup-curves with path-synchronous trigger signals for the end-effector. In an experimental set up the feasibility and flexibility of the automation solution could be successfully tested. The evaluation on three industrial moulds showed that the challenging requirements and the high quality standards could be met. © 2014, German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP).


Zah M.F.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Lutzmann S.,iwb Application Center Augsburg
Production Engineering | Year: 2010

In recent years, the scientific and industrial relevance of additive layer manufacturing (ALM) has grown. In the metal area of ALM, the capacity of laser technologies is noticeably limited. This is mainly due to an inertial beam deflection device, which is also referred to as a mirror galvanometer. In contrast, the electron beam technology offers high power density as well as considerable scanning rates. Therefore, electron beam melting (EBM) seems to be suitable for processing a broad variety of alloys in an economic way. In particular, the enormous scanning rates which can be realized by use of an electron beam enable an economic manufacture of high quality parts. However, profound expertise is required in order to establish EBM as an industrial production technology. By means of mathematical-physical modelling, process stability of the melting step is being increased. Moreover, by solving a detailed thermal model using the finite element method (FEM), substantial knowledge of adequate parameter settings in dependence of the utilised material is developed. Finally, a process window as a function of scan speed and beam power is developed based on experimental results. © German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP) 2009.


Zaeh M.F.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Branner G.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Branner G.,iwb Application Center Augsburg
Production Engineering | Year: 2010

For establishing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) in production technology, an extensive knowledge about the transient physical effects during the manufacturing process is mandatory. In this regard, a high process stability for various alloys, e. g. tool steel 1. 2709 (X3NiCoMoTi 18-9-5), is realisable, if approaches for the virtual qualification of adequate process parameters by means of a numerical simulation based on the finite element analysis (FEA) are developed. Furthermore, specific methods to evaluate and quantify the resulting residual stresses and deformations due to the temperature gradient mechanism (TGM) are required. Hence, the presented work contains particular approaches using the FEA for the simulation of transient physical effects within the additive layer manufacturing (ALM) process. The investigations focus on coupled thermo-mechanical models incorporating specific boundary conditions and temperature dependant material properties to identify the heat impact on residual stresses and deformations. In order to evaluate the structural effects and simultaneously validate the simulation, analysis on residual stresses based on the neutron diffractometry as well as considerations concerning part deformations are presented. © German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP) 2009.


Jelinek M.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Managemenet | Seidel C.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | Reinhart G.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2015

The current development tendency in automotive engineering as well as in aviation exhibits an increased substitution of metal components by carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures. Due to material-specific requirements, not all areas of a metal construction can be replaced by CFRP. Consequently, these regions remain in the CFRP base body as metal joints or reinforcements. Frequently, these hybrid transition areas are involved with an increased quality concern. This research explores the methodological deduction of test specimens which allow an investigation of typical defects based on predefined industrial CFRP machine elements. Thereby, limitations on the relevant thermographic parameters as well as the conceptualisation of the complete referencing process in order to acquire optimal parameter sets are focused within this research. The optimisation through systematic variation and the structured parameter documentation in a database constitute the scope of the prospective research building upon the present paper. By deriving inspection task-specific user guidelines, the predominantly manual thermographic testing process can be considerably accelerated. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.


Musiol J.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Luetke M.,Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology | Schweier M.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | Hatwig J.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management iwb | And 3 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2012

Remote Ablation Cutting (RAC) is a most promising process for cutting thin metal sheets in the automotive, medical and consumer industry. Characteristically for the RAC are high cutting velocities for metal foils as well as material processing of box structures without spatter contamination at the inner surface. Furthermore, the system technology for RAC can also be used for other processes, like welding and marking. Thereby, the flexibility of a production unit is increased, compared to a conventional cutting system. Despite several advantages, the RAC is not yet state of the art in industrial production. Reasons for that are lacking knowledge in the area of process itself and in possible application areas. In this paper a conceptual model of the ablation and the ejection mechanism is presented. It consists of the laser beam absorption within the processing zone, the melt ejection from the kerf and the resulting spatter formation above the part surface. Besides the model, the process boundaries and limitations are identified using empirical data. Addressing possible applications, the following samples of different industrial areas are introduced to show the potential of the process: Cutting of heat exchanger plates, cylinder head seals, and cathode/anode material for Li-Ion-Batteries. Furthermore, a concept and first results of the combined processing of remote cutting and welding with one laser and one scanner optics are presented. © 2012 Copyright Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).


Hoerber J.,Institute for Factory Automation and Production Systems FAPS | Glasschroeder J.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | Pfeffer M.,Institute for Factory Automation and Production Systems FAPS | Schilp J.,Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management Iwb | And 2 more authors.
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2014

Additive manufacturing processes typically used for mechanical parts can be combined with enhanced technologies for electronics production to enable a highly flexible manufacturing of personalized 3D electronic devices. To illustrate different approaches for implementing electrical and electronic functionality, conductive paths and electronic components were embedded in a powder bed printed substrate using an enhanced 3D printer. In addition, a modified Aerosol Jet printing process and assembly technologies adapted from the technology of Molded Interconnect Devices were applied to print circuit patterns and to electrically interconnect components on the surface of the 3D substrates. ©2014 Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.

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