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BURLINGTON, Ma. and SAARBRUECKEN, Germany, May 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Nuance Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ:NUAN) announced it has expanded its partnership with Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz (DFKI GmbH), the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (AI) and world’s largest research center, dedicated to the development of AI methods and applications. Nuance opened an office at the DFKI campus in Saarbruecken to further advance cognitive and conversational AI innovation across several joint research initiatives, including the relationship between humans and in-car systems, as well as AI applied to healthcare systems and omni-channel customer care. Nuance and DFKI have already begun work addressing the application of conversational and cognitive AI for autonomous systems for self-driving cars, where automotive assistants in these environments must be intelligent and collaborative to effectively engage passengers when it’s their turn to drive. Autonomous cars will provide more hands-off time for people, where they’ll now spend their time being entertained or productive – either watching movies, catching up on the latest news, or making better use of long commutes through work productivity apps and services.  However, control of the vehicle needs to be handed back to the driver quickly and seamlessly when hands-on engagement is needed. To better understand the many scenarios where transfer of control will need to happen and how, Nuance and DFKI conducted a human-based usability study to identify the most effective ways to grab a passenger’s attention. Participants of the study were placed in a simulated autonomous car environment in a variety of situations, such as reading, listening to music, writing an email, and watching a movie.  While participants were engaged in activities, the autonomous system would alert them through vibration (haptic), visual and auditory cues to see which of the senses responded the fastest to take the wheel.  The study included a variety of scenarios such as inclement weather conditions, system diagnostic warnings, sensor defects, traffic jams and general rules of the road. Following the scenarios, participants were asked to rate their experience on the pleasantness, usability, information trust and information usefulness in each of the scenarios. Key findings of the study were: The DFKI study is complementary to a recent survey conducted by Nuance in US and the UK among 400 drivers looking at the type of activities that drivers are planning to do as passengers in an autonomous car. If alone on a longer trip, respondents cited their top five activities in the car would be listening to the radio (64%) relaxing (63%), talking on the phone (42%), browsing the Internet (42%) and messaging (36%) -- all representing a combination of visual, auditory and haptic tasks. If driving with others, people naturally engage more in activities with the co-passengers, like having conversations (71%) or listening to the radio (58%), rather than talking on the phone (only 19%) or messaging (23%). “Our partnership with DFKI is focused on advancing the state of the art of AI solutions for physicians, healthcare organizations, automakers, and enterprises,” said Vlad Sejnoha, Chief Technology Officer, Nuance Communications. “Nuance and DFKI share the vision that advanced personal assistants and cognitive technologies can effectively amplify human intelligence, and in the process, transform patient and customer care, and make our experience with smart devices and the connected car vastly more productive and rewarding.” “Cognitive and conversational AI are the key technologies driving the second wave of digitalization, that is based on deep machine understanding of digital data. Partnering with Nuance allows us to put innovation into action – taking our research and directly applying it to the systems that people use every day, and addressing the real-world challenges and complexities of connected smart service platforms.  With a Nuance office at the DFKI Campus in Saarbruecken, where research groups on autonomous driving, deep learning, multimodal dialogue, and language understanding are located, we will continue to push boundaries on the conversation between humans and smart environments, and ultimately bring to market the next generation of cars, bots, assistants and smart objects that simply make everyday life better and safer,” said Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Wahlster, CEO of DFKI. The partnership between Nuance and DFKI is also advancing NLU’s mapping of words to meaning to further develop conversational and cognitive AI interfaces between people and virtual assistants across a number of vertical markets, including healthcare and enterprise omni-channel customer care.  Nuance already supports NLU across more than 40 languages today and is continuously expanding through the application of “Deep NLU,” which goes beyond traditional approaches by extracting deeper linguistic information, a prerequisite for understanding the subtleties of human language. The DFKI team will help take on a project to localize Deep NLU into German, leveraging their existing experience and technology components in this area. Nuance is a shareholder of DFKI, together with other global players like Google, Microsoft, Intel, SAP, BMW, Bosch, and Deutsche Telekom. About the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence GmbH (DFKI) The German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence is the leading German research institute in the field of innovative software technology. In the international scientific community, DFKI ranks among the most recognized "Centers of Excellence" and currently is the largest research center worldwide in the area of Artificial Intelligence and its application in terms of number of employees and the volume of external funds. 485 employees from 60 countries are currently conducting research focusing on Smart Data & Knowledge Services, Cyber-Physical Systems, Multilingual Technologies, Plan-Based Robot Control, Educational Technology Lab, Interactive Textiles, Robotics Innovation Center, Innovative Retail Laboratory, Institute for Information Systems, Embedded Intelligence, Smart Service Engineering, Intelligent Analytics for Massive Data, Intelligent Networks, Agents and Simulated Reality, Augmented Vision, Language Technology, Intelligent User interfaces, and Innovative Factory Systems. Impact: more than 98 professorships of former DFKI employees, and 70 spin-off companies with approximately 2,500 highly qualified jobs. For more information: www.dfki.de Nuance Communications is the pioneer and leader in conversational and cognitive AI innovations that bring intelligence to everyday work and life.  The company delivers solutions that can understand, analyze and respond to human language to increase productivity and amplify human intelligence.  With decades of domain and artificial intelligence expertise, Nuance works with thousands of organizations – in global industries that include healthcare, telecommunications, automotive, financial services, and retail – to create stronger relationships and better experiences for their customers and workforce. To learn more visit www.nuance.com. Trademark reference: Nuance and the Nuance logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of Nuance Communications, Inc. or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners.


BURLINGTON, Ma. and SAARBRUECKEN, Germany, May 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Nuance Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ:NUAN) announced it has expanded its partnership with Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz (DFKI GmbH), the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (AI) and world’s largest research center, dedicated to the development of AI methods and applications. Nuance opened an office at the DFKI campus in Saarbruecken to further advance cognitive and conversational AI innovation across several joint research initiatives, including the relationship between humans and in-car systems, as well as AI applied to healthcare systems and omni-channel customer care. Nuance and DFKI have already begun work addressing the application of conversational and cognitive AI for autonomous systems for self-driving cars, where automotive assistants in these environments must be intelligent and collaborative to effectively engage passengers when it’s their turn to drive. Autonomous cars will provide more hands-off time for people, where they’ll now spend their time being entertained or productive – either watching movies, catching up on the latest news, or making better use of long commutes through work productivity apps and services.  However, control of the vehicle needs to be handed back to the driver quickly and seamlessly when hands-on engagement is needed. To better understand the many scenarios where transfer of control will need to happen and how, Nuance and DFKI conducted a human-based usability study to identify the most effective ways to grab a passenger’s attention. Participants of the study were placed in a simulated autonomous car environment in a variety of situations, such as reading, listening to music, writing an email, and watching a movie.  While participants were engaged in activities, the autonomous system would alert them through vibration (haptic), visual and auditory cues to see which of the senses responded the fastest to take the wheel.  The study included a variety of scenarios such as inclement weather conditions, system diagnostic warnings, sensor defects, traffic jams and general rules of the road. Following the scenarios, participants were asked to rate their experience on the pleasantness, usability, information trust and information usefulness in each of the scenarios. Key findings of the study were: The DFKI study is complementary to a recent survey conducted by Nuance in US and the UK among 400 drivers looking at the type of activities that drivers are planning to do as passengers in an autonomous car. If alone on a longer trip, respondents cited their top five activities in the car would be listening to the radio (64%) relaxing (63%), talking on the phone (42%), browsing the Internet (42%) and messaging (36%) -- all representing a combination of visual, auditory and haptic tasks. If driving with others, people naturally engage more in activities with the co-passengers, like having conversations (71%) or listening to the radio (58%), rather than talking on the phone (only 19%) or messaging (23%). “Our partnership with DFKI is focused on advancing the state of the art of AI solutions for physicians, healthcare organizations, automakers, and enterprises,” said Vlad Sejnoha, Chief Technology Officer, Nuance Communications. “Nuance and DFKI share the vision that advanced personal assistants and cognitive technologies can effectively amplify human intelligence, and in the process, transform patient and customer care, and make our experience with smart devices and the connected car vastly more productive and rewarding.” “Cognitive and conversational AI are the key technologies driving the second wave of digitalization, that is based on deep machine understanding of digital data. Partnering with Nuance allows us to put innovation into action – taking our research and directly applying it to the systems that people use every day, and addressing the real-world challenges and complexities of connected smart service platforms.  With a Nuance office at the DFKI Campus in Saarbruecken, where research groups on autonomous driving, deep learning, multimodal dialogue, and language understanding are located, we will continue to push boundaries on the conversation between humans and smart environments, and ultimately bring to market the next generation of cars, bots, assistants and smart objects that simply make everyday life better and safer,” said Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Wahlster, CEO of DFKI. The partnership between Nuance and DFKI is also advancing NLU’s mapping of words to meaning to further develop conversational and cognitive AI interfaces between people and virtual assistants across a number of vertical markets, including healthcare and enterprise omni-channel customer care.  Nuance already supports NLU across more than 40 languages today and is continuously expanding through the application of “Deep NLU,” which goes beyond traditional approaches by extracting deeper linguistic information, a prerequisite for understanding the subtleties of human language. The DFKI team will help take on a project to localize Deep NLU into German, leveraging their existing experience and technology components in this area. Nuance is a shareholder of DFKI, together with other global players like Google, Microsoft, Intel, SAP, BMW, Bosch, and Deutsche Telekom. About the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence GmbH (DFKI) The German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence is the leading German research institute in the field of innovative software technology. In the international scientific community, DFKI ranks among the most recognized "Centers of Excellence" and currently is the largest research center worldwide in the area of Artificial Intelligence and its application in terms of number of employees and the volume of external funds. 485 employees from 60 countries are currently conducting research focusing on Smart Data & Knowledge Services, Cyber-Physical Systems, Multilingual Technologies, Plan-Based Robot Control, Educational Technology Lab, Interactive Textiles, Robotics Innovation Center, Innovative Retail Laboratory, Institute for Information Systems, Embedded Intelligence, Smart Service Engineering, Intelligent Analytics for Massive Data, Intelligent Networks, Agents and Simulated Reality, Augmented Vision, Language Technology, Intelligent User interfaces, and Innovative Factory Systems. Impact: more than 98 professorships of former DFKI employees, and 70 spin-off companies with approximately 2,500 highly qualified jobs. For more information: www.dfki.de Nuance Communications is the pioneer and leader in conversational and cognitive AI innovations that bring intelligence to everyday work and life.  The company delivers solutions that can understand, analyze and respond to human language to increase productivity and amplify human intelligence.  With decades of domain and artificial intelligence expertise, Nuance works with thousands of organizations – in global industries that include healthcare, telecommunications, automotive, financial services, and retail – to create stronger relationships and better experiences for their customers and workforce. To learn more visit www.nuance.com. Trademark reference: Nuance and the Nuance logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of Nuance Communications, Inc. or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners.


BURLINGTON, Ma. and SAARBRUECKEN, Germany, May 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Nuance Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ:NUAN) announced it has expanded its partnership with Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz (DFKI GmbH), the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (AI) and world’s largest research center, dedicated to the development of AI methods and applications. Nuance opened an office at the DFKI campus in Saarbruecken to further advance cognitive and conversational AI innovation across several joint research initiatives, including the relationship between humans and in-car systems, as well as AI applied to healthcare systems and omni-channel customer care. Nuance and DFKI have already begun work addressing the application of conversational and cognitive AI for autonomous systems for self-driving cars, where automotive assistants in these environments must be intelligent and collaborative to effectively engage passengers when it’s their turn to drive. Autonomous cars will provide more hands-off time for people, where they’ll now spend their time being entertained or productive – either watching movies, catching up on the latest news, or making better use of long commutes through work productivity apps and services.  However, control of the vehicle needs to be handed back to the driver quickly and seamlessly when hands-on engagement is needed. To better understand the many scenarios where transfer of control will need to happen and how, Nuance and DFKI conducted a human-based usability study to identify the most effective ways to grab a passenger’s attention. Participants of the study were placed in a simulated autonomous car environment in a variety of situations, such as reading, listening to music, writing an email, and watching a movie.  While participants were engaged in activities, the autonomous system would alert them through vibration (haptic), visual and auditory cues to see which of the senses responded the fastest to take the wheel.  The study included a variety of scenarios such as inclement weather conditions, system diagnostic warnings, sensor defects, traffic jams and general rules of the road. Following the scenarios, participants were asked to rate their experience on the pleasantness, usability, information trust and information usefulness in each of the scenarios. Key findings of the study were: The DFKI study is complementary to a recent survey conducted by Nuance in US and the UK among 400 drivers looking at the type of activities that drivers are planning to do as passengers in an autonomous car. If alone on a longer trip, respondents cited their top five activities in the car would be listening to the radio (64%) relaxing (63%), talking on the phone (42%), browsing the Internet (42%) and messaging (36%) -- all representing a combination of visual, auditory and haptic tasks. If driving with others, people naturally engage more in activities with the co-passengers, like having conversations (71%) or listening to the radio (58%), rather than talking on the phone (only 19%) or messaging (23%). “Our partnership with DFKI is focused on advancing the state of the art of AI solutions for physicians, healthcare organizations, automakers, and enterprises,” said Vlad Sejnoha, Chief Technology Officer, Nuance Communications. “Nuance and DFKI share the vision that advanced personal assistants and cognitive technologies can effectively amplify human intelligence, and in the process, transform patient and customer care, and make our experience with smart devices and the connected car vastly more productive and rewarding.” “Cognitive and conversational AI are the key technologies driving the second wave of digitalization, that is based on deep machine understanding of digital data. Partnering with Nuance allows us to put innovation into action – taking our research and directly applying it to the systems that people use every day, and addressing the real-world challenges and complexities of connected smart service platforms.  With a Nuance office at the DFKI Campus in Saarbruecken, where research groups on autonomous driving, deep learning, multimodal dialogue, and language understanding are located, we will continue to push boundaries on the conversation between humans and smart environments, and ultimately bring to market the next generation of cars, bots, assistants and smart objects that simply make everyday life better and safer,” said Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Wahlster, CEO of DFKI. The partnership between Nuance and DFKI is also advancing NLU’s mapping of words to meaning to further develop conversational and cognitive AI interfaces between people and virtual assistants across a number of vertical markets, including healthcare and enterprise omni-channel customer care.  Nuance already supports NLU across more than 40 languages today and is continuously expanding through the application of “Deep NLU,” which goes beyond traditional approaches by extracting deeper linguistic information, a prerequisite for understanding the subtleties of human language. The DFKI team will help take on a project to localize Deep NLU into German, leveraging their existing experience and technology components in this area. Nuance is a shareholder of DFKI, together with other global players like Google, Microsoft, Intel, SAP, BMW, Bosch, and Deutsche Telekom. About the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence GmbH (DFKI) The German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence is the leading German research institute in the field of innovative software technology. In the international scientific community, DFKI ranks among the most recognized "Centers of Excellence" and currently is the largest research center worldwide in the area of Artificial Intelligence and its application in terms of number of employees and the volume of external funds. 485 employees from 60 countries are currently conducting research focusing on Smart Data & Knowledge Services, Cyber-Physical Systems, Multilingual Technologies, Plan-Based Robot Control, Educational Technology Lab, Interactive Textiles, Robotics Innovation Center, Innovative Retail Laboratory, Institute for Information Systems, Embedded Intelligence, Smart Service Engineering, Intelligent Analytics for Massive Data, Intelligent Networks, Agents and Simulated Reality, Augmented Vision, Language Technology, Intelligent User interfaces, and Innovative Factory Systems. Impact: more than 98 professorships of former DFKI employees, and 70 spin-off companies with approximately 2,500 highly qualified jobs. For more information: www.dfki.de Nuance Communications is the pioneer and leader in conversational and cognitive AI innovations that bring intelligence to everyday work and life.  The company delivers solutions that can understand, analyze and respond to human language to increase productivity and amplify human intelligence.  With decades of domain and artificial intelligence expertise, Nuance works with thousands of organizations – in global industries that include healthcare, telecommunications, automotive, financial services, and retail – to create stronger relationships and better experiences for their customers and workforce. To learn more visit www.nuance.com. Trademark reference: Nuance and the Nuance logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of Nuance Communications, Inc. or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners.


Gaubatz P.,University of Vienna | Hummer W.,Vienna University of Technology | Zdun U.,University of Vienna | Strembeck M.,Institute for Information Systems
Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Computing | Year: 2014

Real-time collaborative Web applications allow a multitude of users to concurrently work on a shared document. Especially in business contexts it is often necessary to be able to precisely define and restrict who is allowed to edit which data field of such a shared document. Existing solutions for enforcing such access control restrictions typically rely on a central service, the policy decision point. However, for use cases with unreliable or limited connectivity, such as mobile devices, a permanent connection to this centralized policy decision point can not be guaranteed. To address this problem, we present a novel approach that includes methods for client-side enforcement of access control constraints for offline users, and merging of offline changes, that enables users to edit such access constrained shared documents offline. We propose a generic conflict detection and resolution approach that attempts to resolve merge conflicts that are inherent to access constrained documents automatically while prioritizing online users and maximizing the number of filled out data fields in a document. In addition, we discuss and evaluate our approach via a prototype implementation. Copyright 2014 ACM.


Gaubatz P.,University of Vienna | Hummer W.,Vienna University of Technology | Zdun U.,University of Vienna | Strembeck M.,Institute for Information Systems
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2013

Real-time collaborative Web applications allow multiple users to concurrently work on a shared document. In addition to popular use cases, such as collaborative text editing, they can also be used for form-based business applications that often require forms to be filled out by different stakeholders. In this context, different users typically need to fill in different parts of a form. Role-based access control and entailment constraints provide means for defining such restrictions. Major challenges in the context of integrating collaborative Web applications with access control restrictions are how to support changes of the configuration of access constrained UI elements at runtime, realizing acceptable performance and update behaviour, and an easy integration with existing Web applications. In this paper, we address these challenges through a novel approach supporting constrained and customized UI views that support runtime changes and integrate well with existing Web applications. Using a prototypical implementation, we show that the approach provides acceptable update behaviour and requires only a small performance overhead for the access control tasks with linear scalability. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Lawall A.,Institute for Information Systems | Reichelt D.,Institute for Information Systems | Schaller T.,Institute for Information Systems
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series | Year: 2015

In the age of cloud computing, companies still have the problem to manage access rights for resources. This is especially true, if companies are combined to virtual organizations and want to share resources that are located at cloud providers. For a consistent authorization model, an up to date knowledge about partner organizations is indispensable. This contribution proposes an approach to request the automatic deployment of resources from a cloud provider. The access rights to the resources are managed and administered by the proprietary company, even if partner organizations are involved. They are not published to the cloud provider, but remain in the owning company. This establishes a separation of resources (i.a. systems) and authorization, which alleviates security risks. Attackers of resources can not access them because the authorization model is not implemented on the same location as the resources. This makes the intrusion much more complex. Copyright 2015 ACM.


Lofi C.,Institute for Information Systems | Guntzer U.,University of Tübingen | Balke W.-T.,Institute for Information Systems
Advances in Database Technology - EDBT 2010 - 13th International Conference on Extending Database Technology, Proceedings | Year: 2010

When selecting alternatives from large amounts of data, trade-offs play a vital role in everyday decision making. In databases this is primarily reflected by the top-k retrieval paradigm. But recently it has been convincingly argued that it is almost impossible for users to provide meaningful scoring functions for top-k retrieval, subsequently leading to the adoption of the skyline paradigm. Here users just specify the relevant attributes in a query and all suboptimal alternatives are filtered following the Pareto semantics. Up to now the intuitive concept of compensation, however, cannot be used in skyline queries, which also contributes to the often unmanageably large result set sizes. In this paper we discuss an innovative and efficient method for computing skylines allowing the use of qualitative trade-offs. Such trade-offs compare examples from the database on a focused subset of attributes. Thus, users can provide information on how much they are willing to sacrifice to gain an improvement in some other attribute(s). Our contribution is the design of the first skyline algorithm allowing for qualitative compensation across attributes. Moreover, we also provide an novel trade-off representation structure to speed up retrieval. Indeed our experiments show efficient performance allowing for focused skyline sets in practical applications. Moreover, we show that the necessary amount of object comparisons can be sped up by an order of magnitude using our indexing techniques. Copyright 2010 ACM.


Versaci F.,Institute for Information Systems
Proceedings of the International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems - ICPADS | Year: 2013

We present a new, deadlock-free, routing scheme for toroidal interconnection networks, called OutFlank Routing (OFR). OFR is an adaptive strategy which exploits non-minimal links, both in the source and in the destination nodes. When minimal links are congested, OFR deroutes packets to carefully chosen intermediate destinations, in order to obtain travel paths which are only an additive constant longer than the shortest ones. Since routing performance is very sensitive to changes in the traffic model or in the router parameters, an accurate discrete-event simulator of the toroidal network has been developed to empirically validate OFR, by comparing it against other relevant routing strategies, over a range of typical real-world traffic patterns. On the 16x16x16 (4096 nodes) simulated network OFR exhibits improvements of the maximum sustained throughput between 14% and 114%, with respect to Adaptive Bubble Routing. © 2013 IEEE.


Quirchmayr T.,Institute for Information Systems | Strembeck M.,Institute for Information Systems
Proceedings of WOSIS 2013: 10th International Workshop on Security in Information Systems - In Conjunction with the 15th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems, ICEIS 2013 | Year: 2013

Entailment constraints, such as mutual exclusion or binding constraints, are an important means to specify and enforce business processes. However, the inherent concurrency of a distributed system may lead to omission. Such failures impact the enforcement of entailment constraints in a process-driven SOA. In particular, the impact of these failures as well as the corresponding countermeasures depend on the architecture of the respective process engine. In this paper, we discuss the impact of omission failures on the enforcement of entailment constraints in process-driven SOAs. In this context, we especially consider if the respective process engine acts as an orchestration engine or as a choreography engine. Copyright © 2013 SCITEPRESS.


Quirchmayr T.,Institute for Information Systems | Strembeck M.,Institute for Information Systems
Computer Journal | Year: 2014

A distributed business process is executed in a distributed computing environment. In this context, the service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm provides a mature and well-understood framework for the integration of software services. Entailment constraints, such as mutual exclusion or binding constraints, are an important means to specify and enforce business processes in a SOA. Process engines control the process flow and are responsible for the coordination of the services that participate in a distributed business process. Since the enforcement of entailment constraints requires knowledge of the subjects and roles who executed particular task instances, we need to communicate the execution history of the respective tasks and processes between the services and the process engines. However, the inherent concurrency of a distributed system may lead to omission failures. Such failures may impair the enforcement of entailment constraints in a process-driven SOA. In particular, the impact of these failures as well as the corresponding countermeasures depend on the architecture of the respective process engine. In this paper, we discuss communication schemes for (distributed) process execution histories in a SOA. In particular, we provide generic procedures for different communication schemes and examine the efficiency of these schemes as well as their characteristics if omission failures occur. In this context, we especially consider if the respective process engine acts as an orchestration engine or as a choreography engine. © 2014 The British Computer Society 2014. All rights reserved.

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