Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction

Food, Slovakia

Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction

Food, Slovakia

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Danko J.,University of Veterinary Medicine in Kosice | Schlarmannova J.,Constantine the Philosopher University | Chrenek P.,Slovak University of Agriculture | Chrenek P.,Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction
Folia Biologica (Poland) | Year: 2014

Transgenic rabbits are excellent animal models for human diseases and suitable bioreactors for the production of recombinant proteins on an experimental and commercial scale. The aim of this study was to compare the structure of the mWAP-hFVIII transgenic and non-transgenic rabbit ovarian and testicular tissue. Ovarian and testicular tissue samples were taken from transgenic and non-transgenic New Zealand White rabbits, examined by optical microscopy and analyzed morphometrically. An increase of the relative volume of primary follicles and a decrease of the relative volume of antral follicles was detected in the transgenic ovarian structure (P<0.05), but other developmental follicular stages and follicular diameters were not affected (P>0.05). In the testes a significant decrease (P<0.05) of the epithelial height was detected in the transgenic testicular structure, but the relative volume of all basic structures (germinal epithelium, interstitium and lumen) was unaltered (P>0.05). Generally, this study demonstrates a weak negative effect of mWAP-hFVIII transgenesis on rabbit gonadal structure. © Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, PAS, Kraków, 2014.


Maruniakova N.,Slovak University of Agriculture | Kadasi A.,Slovak University of Agriculture | Kadasi A.,Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction | Sirotkin A.V.,Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part B Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes | Year: 2015

Assessment of A-trichothecene mycotoxins (T-2 and HT-2 toxins) effect combined with growth factor IGF-I, and the metabolic hormones leptin and ghrelin on progesterone secretion by rabbit ovarian fragments was studied. Rabbit ovarian fragments were incubated without (control group) or with T-2/HT-2 toxin, or their combinations with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), leptin or ghrelin at various concentartions for 24 h. Secretion of progesterone was determined by ELISA. First, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxins at all doses used (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 ng mL–1) were not shown to be potential regulators of progesterone secretion in rabbit ovarian fragments. Second, T-2 toxin but not HT-2 toxin combined with IGF-I was shown to be potential regulator of progesterone secretion in rabbit ovarian fragments. T-2 toxin at all doses used (0.01; 0.1; 1; 10; and 100 ng mL–1) combined with IGF-I (at dose 100 ng mL–1) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased progesterone secretion by rabbit ovarian fragments. Third, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxin at all doses used in the study (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 ng mL–1) combined with leptin (at dose 1000 ng mL–1) were not shown to be potential regulators of progesterone secretion in rabbit ovarian fragments. Furthermore, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxin at all doses used in the study (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 ng mL–1) combined with ghrelin (500 ng mL–1) were not shown to be potential regulators of progesterone secretion in rabbit ovarian fragments. Results in this study showed that trichothecene as T-2 toxin combined with IGF-I but not HT-2 toxin was able to decrease progesterone secretion in rabbit ovarian fragments in vitro. Experimental results of T-2 and HT-2 toxins combined with leptin and ghrelin did not confirm ability to modulate progesterone secretion by ovarian fragments in rabbits. © 2015, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Roychoudhury S.,Assam University | Sirotkin A.V.,Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction | Toman R.,Slovak University of Agriculture | Kolesarova A.,Slovak University of Agriculture
Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part B Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes | Year: 2014

The objective of this in vitro study was to examine dose-dependent changes in the secretion activity (progesterone, 17β-estradiol and insulin-like growth factor-I) of rat ovarian fragments after experimental cobalt (Co) administration including the apoptotic potential of Co on rat ovarian fragments by evaluating the expression of apoptotic markers Bax and caspase-3. Ovarian fragments were incubated with cobalt sulphate (CoSO4.7H2O) at the doses 90, 170, 330 and 500 μg.mL−1 for 24 h and compared with control group without Co addition. Release of progesterone (P4) 17β-estradiol and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) by ovarian fragments was assessed by RIA, expression of Bax and caspase-3 by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Observations show that P4 release by ovarian fragments was significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited after cobalt sulphate addition at higher doses 170–500 μg.mL−1 used in the study in comparison to control. However, cobalt sulphate addition did not cause any significant change in the release of 17β-estradiol by ovarian fragments at all the doses used in the study (90–500 μg.mL−1) in comparison to control. On the contrary, IGF-I release by ovarian fragments was significantly (P < 0.05) stimulated after cobalt sulphate addition at the lowest dose 90 μg.mL−1 in comparison to control, while other doses did not cause any significant change. Also, addition of cobalt sulphate decreased the expression of both the apoptotic peptides Bax and caspase-3 at the higher doses 170, 330 and 500 μg.mL−1, but not at the lowest dose 90 μg.mL−1 used in the study. Obtained results suggest Co induced (1) inhibition in secretion of steroid hormone progesterone, (2) dose-dependent increase in the release of growth factor IGF-I, and (3) decrease in the expression of markers of apoptosis (Bax and caspase-3) of rat ovarian fragments. © 2014, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Kolesarova A.,Slovak University of Agriculture | Sirotkin A.V.,Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction | Mellen M.,Poultry Slovakia Ltd | Roychoudhury S.,Assam University
Physiological Research | Year: 2015

Protein kinases, transcription factors and other apoptosis- and proliferation-related proteins can regulate reproduction, but their involvement in sexual maturation remains to be elucidated. The general aim of the in vivo and in vitro experiments with porcine ovarian granulosa cells was to identify possible intracellular regulators of female sexual maturation. For this purpose, proliferation (expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen - PCNA, mitogen-activated protein kinases - ERK 1,2 related MAPK and cyclin B1), apoptosis (expression of the apoptotic protein Bax and apoptosis regulator Bcl-2 protein), expression of some protein kinases (cAMP dependent protein kinase - PKA, cGMPdependent protein kinase - PKG, tyrosine kinase - TK) and cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB-1) was examined in granulosa cells isolated from ovaries of immature and mature gilts. Expression of PCNA, ERK1,2 related MAPK, cyclin B1, Bcl-2, Bax, PKA, CREB-1, TK and PKG in porcine granulosa cells were detected by immunocytochemistry. Sexual maturation was associated with significant increase in the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, PKA, CREB-1 and TK and with decrease in the expression of ERK1,2 related MAPK, cyclin B1 and PKG in granulosa cells. No significant difference in PCNA expression was noted. The present data obtained from in vitro study indicate that sexual maturation in females is influenced by puberty-related changes in porcine ovarian signaling substances: increase in Bcl-2, Bax, PKA, CREB-1, TK and decrease in ERK1,2 related MAPK, cyclin B1 and PKG. It suggests that these signaling molecules could be potential regulators of porcine sexual maturation. © 2015 Institute of Physiology.


PubMed | Institute for Farm Animal Genetics and Reproduction
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Anatomia, histologia, embryologia | Year: 2013

The aim of the study was to determine the effect of short-term hyperthermia and Hsp70 blockage on ultrastructural changes in cell organelles and nucleoli of rabbit preimplantation embryos. The embryos were cultured either at 37.5C (control, C) or 41.5C (hyperthermia, HT) during 6 h. The antibody against Hsp70 was added into the culture medium (4 g/ml) of morula stage embryos from C and HT groups. After termination of the culture, the embryos were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The embryos exposed to hyperthermia showed increased volume of lipid droplets, considerable occurrence of cellular debris in the perivitelline space and slight changes in the occurrence of microvilli on the surface of trophoblastic cells. In the embryos exposed to anti-Hsp 70 at 37.5C, there were considerable changes in mitochondria morphology, decreased volume of dense bodies in the cytoplasm and considerable changes in the occurrence of microvilli on the surface of trophoblastic cells. In the group of embryos exposed simultaneously to hyperthermia and anti-Hsp 70, mitochondria were also expanded and swollen; the volume of flocculent vesicles and lipid droplets was increased and the volume of dense bodies in the cytoplasm was diminished. General organization of the cytoplasm in groups with anti-Hsp70 was characterized by cell organelle segregation. Averaged size of the nucleolar area was significantly increased in the embryos exposed to hyperthermia, whereas in the group exposed to the anti-Hsp70 without hyperthermia it was significantly diminished. Hyperthermia also caused disintegration of compact status of the nucleoli. In presence of anti-Hsp 70, the structural changes, described within the nucleoli during hyperthermia, were not observed. In conclusion, these results document ultrastructural changes in cell organelles of rabbit preimplantation embryo caused by hyperthermia, and also changes in the nucleolar structures, at which presence of Hsp-70 inhibit these changes.

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