Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche

Perugia, Italy

Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche

Perugia, Italy
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PubMed | Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche, Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Sicily and Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Sardinia
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Italian journal of food safety | Year: 2016

The presence of foreign bodies in mushrooms affects their marketability and may result in health risks to consumers. The inspection of fresh or dried mushrooms today is very important in view of the increased consumption of this kind of food. Ten samples of dried mushrooms collected in supermarkets were examined for evidence of entomological contamination by macro and microscopic analytical methods, the so-called


Roila R.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | Branciari R.,University of Perugia | Ranucci D.,University of Perugia | Ortenzi R.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | And 3 more authors.
Italian Journal of Food Safety | Year: 2016

Olive mill wastewater polyphenol extract was tested for antimicrobial activity against 64 strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens responsible for mozzarella discolouration. The extract showed a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)50 value of 5 mg/mL and a MIC90 value of 7 mg/mL. The MBC50 and MBC90 values corresponded to 6 and 8 mg/mL, respectively. The MIC concentration (7 mg/mL) was demonstrated to have a bacteriostatic effect while maintaining the bacterial concentration on the levels of the inoculum for 48 hours. The 3/2 MIC concentration was responsible for four logs CFU/mL depletion in colony count after 24 h. As the extract concentration decreased from MIC value, no inhibitory effects were recorded. © R. Roila et al., 2016.


Branciari R.,University of Perugia | Valiani A.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | Franceschini R.,Guglielmo Marconi University | Ranucci D.,University of Perugia | And 3 more authors.
Italian Journal of Food Safety | Year: 2016

An experimental study for the evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes inactivation during a hot smoking process in tench was performed using Listeria innocua strains. Furthermore, the survival of L. monocytogenes in smoked tench was determined after post-processing in contaminated samples, evaluating the growth potential during storage. L. innocua was not detected after the smoking process. In the challenge test, the growth potential of L. monocytogenes was 5.68 log colony forming unit g−1. The results showed that hot smoking at an inner temperature around 72°C is able to eliminate the microorganism. Neverthless, the product is able to support the growth of the pathogen if post-process contamination occurs as the food is suitable for Listeria multiplication. Product recontamination should be prevented by means of appropriate application of hygiene measures. © 2016, Page Press Publications. All rights reserved.


Ortenzi R.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | Branciari R.,University of Perugia | Primavilla S.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | Ranucci D.,University of Perugia | Valiani A.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche
Italian Journal of Food Safety | Year: 2015

In the present study, a microbiological challenge test in artificially contaminated raw milk Pecorino Umbro cheese during cheese-making was carried out. Raw ewe milk was contaminated by a suspension of particular Listeria monocytogenes strains. The number of L. monocytogenes and L. monocytogenes dynamic growth were evaluated during cheese-making and storage. A significant decrease of the viable count of L. monocytogenes was observed during ripening and L. monocytogenes viable count was below the limit of quantification during storage. The results show that the product is unable to support the growth of the pathogen. © 2015 Page Press Publications. All rights reserved.


Ercoli L.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | Farneti S.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | Ranucci D.,University of Perugia | Scuota S.,Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche | Branciari R.,University of Perugia
Italian Journal of Food Safety | Year: 2015

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can cause severe clinical diseases in humans, such as haemorrhagic colitis (HC) and haemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Although ruminants, primarily cattle, have been suggested as typical reservoirs of STEC, many food products of other origins, including pork products, have been confirmed as vehicles for STEC transmission. Only in rare cases, pork consumption is associated with severe clinical symptoms caused by high pathogenic STEC strains. However, in these outbreaks, it is unknown whether the contamination of food products occurs during swine processing or via cross-contamination from foodstuffs of different sources. In swine, STEC plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oedema disease. In particular a Shiga toxin subtype, named stx2e, it is considered as a key factor involved in the damage of swine endothelial cells. On the contrary, stx2e-producing Escherichia coli has rarely been isolated in humans, and usually only from asymptomatic carriers or from patients with mild symptoms, such as uncomplicated diarrhoea. In fact, the presence of gene stx2e, encoding for stx2e, has rarely been reported in STEC strains that cause HUS. Moreover, stx2e-producing STEC isolated from humans and pigs were found to differ in serogroup, their virulence profile and interaction with intestinal epithelial cells. Because of the limited epidemiologic data of STEC in swine and the increasing role of non-O157 STEC in human illnesses, the relationship between swine STEC and human disease needs to be further investigated. © 2015 L. Ercoli et al.


PubMed | Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche and University of Perugia
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Italian journal of food safety | Year: 2017

Acrylamide is a by-product of the Maillard reaction and is potentially carcinogenic to humans. It is found in a number of foods with higher concentrations in carbohydrate-rich foods and moderate levels of protein-rich foods such as meat, fish and seafood. Acrylamide levels in food distributed in vending machines placed in public areas of the city of Perugia were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Samples included five different categories, depending on the characteristics of the products: i) potato chips; ii) salted bakery products; iii) biscuits and wafers; iv) sweet bakery products; v) sandwiches. A high variability in acrylamide level among different foods and within the same category was detected. Potato chips showed the highest amount of acrylamide (1781637 g/kg) followed by salted bakery products (211 245 g/kg), biscuits and wafers (184254 g/kg), sweet bakery products (10072 g/kg) and sandwiches (4210 g/kg). In the potato chips and sandwiches categories, all of the samples revealed the presence of acrylamide, while different prevalence was registered in the other foods considered. The data of this study highlight the presence of acrylamide in different foods sold in vending machines and this data could be useful to understand the contribution of this type of consumption to human exposure to this compound.


PubMed | Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche, University of Perugia and Guglielmo Marconi University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Italian journal of food safety | Year: 2016

An experimental study for the evaluation of


PubMed | Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche and University of Perugia
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Italian journal of food safety | Year: 2016

In the present study, a microbiological challenge test in artificially contaminated raw milk


PubMed | Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche and University of Perugia
Type: Review | Journal: Italian journal of food safety | Year: 2016

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can cause severe clinical diseases in humans, such as haemorrhagic colitis (HC) and haemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Although ruminants, primarily cattle, have been suggested as typical reservoirs of STEC, many food products of other origins, including pork products, have been confirmed as vehicles for STEC transmission. Only in rare cases, pork consumption is associated with severe clinical symptoms caused by high pathogenic STEC strains. However, in these outbreaks, it is unknown whether the contamination of food products occurs during swine processing or via cross-contamination from foodstuffs of different sources. In swine, STEC plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oedema disease. In particular a Shiga toxin subtype, named stx2e, it is considered as a key factor involved in the damage of swine endothelial cells. On the contrary, stx2e-producing Escherichia coli has rarely been isolated in humans, and usually only from asymptomatic carriers or from patients with mild symptoms, such as uncomplicated diarrhoea. In fact, the presence of gene stx2e, encoding for stx2e, has rarely been reported in STEC strains that cause HUS. Moreover, stx2e-producing STEC isolated from humans and pigs were found to differ in serogroup, their virulence profile and interaction with intestinal epithelial cells. Because of the limited epidemiologic data of STEC in swine and the increasing role of non-O157 STEC in human illnesses, the relationship between swine STEC and human disease needs to be further investigated.


PubMed | Institute for Experimental Veterinary Medicine of Umbria and Marche and University of Perugia
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Italian journal of food safety | Year: 2016

Olive mill wastewater polyphenol extract was tested for antimicrobial activity against 64 strains of

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