Institute for Environmental Health Inc.

Federal Way, WA, United States

Institute for Environmental Health Inc.

Federal Way, WA, United States
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News Article | June 14, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Experts to discuss latest research on exposure to environmental toxicants and how they affect development in the womb and disease in later life PHILADELPHIA - Several critical periods over a human life span - including before birth -- determine when individuals are the most susceptible to environmental toxicants. Researchers will gather at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania this Monday to discuss these "Windows of Susceptibility" during the 12th Annual Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (CEET) Symposium. CEET is an Environmental Health Science Core Center funded by National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). For the first time, there will also be a Town Hall Meeting following the symposium to discuss environmental health concerns and disparities in the Chester community, such as high rates of pre-term birth, asthma, and cancer. WHERE: Symposium at the Smilow Commons and Auditorium Perelman School of Medicine (PSOM) 3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 Post-Symposium Town Hall at Faith Temple Holy Church 1007 West 7th Street, Chester, PA, 19013 Keynote speaker: John McLahlan, PhD, chair of Environmental Studies and professor of Pharmacology at Tulane University Townhall Meeting Featured Guest: Linda Birnbaum, PhD, DABT, ATS Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Toxicology Program Additional speakers from the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions "In Utero Mouse Model of BPA Exposure: Physiology, Behavior and Epigenetics" - Marisa Bartolomei, PhD, professor of Cell and Developmental Biology (University of Pennsylvania) "Human In Utero Exposures to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals" - Sara Pinney, MD, MS, assistant professor of Pediatrics (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) "Toxicology Findings on BPA" - Luisa Camacho, PhD, Senior Staff Fellow (Food and Drug Administration, National Center for Toxicological Research) "Environmental Epigenetics: A Mechanistic Link to Health, Disease, and Intervention" - Shuk-Mei Ho, PhD, Jacob G. Schmidlapp Professor and Chair of Environmental Health, Director of the Cincinnati Cancer Consortium, Director of Center for Environmental Genetics "Perinatal exposure of rats to low doses of Zeranol induces transgeneration effects on sexual development, fecundity and susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis" - Helmut Zarbl, professor of Toxicology, Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease Director (Rutgers) "Environmental Hormones and Other Signals" - John McLahlan, PhD, Celia Scott Weatherhead and Albert J. Weatherhead III Distinguished Chair of Environmental Studies, professor of Pharmacology (Tulane University) "Challenges in Measuring Endogenous and Exogenous Hormones" - Clementina Mesaros, PhD, research assistant professor and Technical Director of Translational Biomarker Core of CEET Town Hall meeting at Faith Temple Holy Church 1007 West 7th Street, Chester, PA, 19013 Marilyn Howarth, MD, FACOEM, Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (University of Pennsylvania) Rev. Horace Strand, Pastor of Faith Temple Holy Church and Chairman of Chester Environmental Partnership (CEP) John and Dolores Shelton, CEP members and residents of Chester Linda Birnbaum, PhD, DABT, ATS, NIEHS and NTP director Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $6.7 billion enterprise. The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2016 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report -- Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2016, Penn Medicine provided $393 million to benefit our community.


News Article | June 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Drawing on years of experience, Brian Garett, a product manager and laboratory ventilation expert from Labconco will point out common misconceptions about hood safety and the cold hard facts about saving energy in the lab. He will demonstrate how true high-performance fume hoods can and should operate, will place a spotlight on decades old Biosafety Cabinet (BSC) conventions, and explore the vast improvements seen in the newest type of Class II BSC. This webinar is ideal for those involved in laboratory planning, management or safety. Attendees will be able to overcome misinformation, which has led many modern laboratories to waste money while allowing unnecessary safety risks to persist. Through this webinar, participants will better understand how lab hood air usage directly impacts the bottom line and be able to identify a true high-performance fume hood. Attendees will also be able to develop a well-rounded strategy for ensuring maximum safety and still lower operational cost. Garrett received a Bachelor of Science from Truman State University. He currently serves as a product manager for Biosafety Cabinets & Ductless Fume Hoods at Labconco Corporation. In 2010, he was accredited as a LEED Green Associate with US Green Building Council. Before joining Labconco, he was a Laboratory Director for the Institute for Environmental Health Laboratories, where he focused on planning and management of two labs in the beef industry, analyzing food-borne pathogens. LabRoots will host the webinar June 29, 2017, beginning at 9:00 a.m. PDT, 11:00 a.m. CDT. To read more about this event, discover the continuing education credits offered, or to register for free, click here. About Labconco Serving the scientific community since 1925, Labconco Corporation manufactures laboratory equipment, specializing in ventilation enclosures such as chemical fume hoods and biological safety cabinets. In addition, Labconco produces other lab equipment, such as glassware washers and freeze dryers. Labconco has ISO 9001 certification, one measure of its commitment to quality and consistency in design and manufacturing. Manufactured in Kansas City, Missouri and Fort Scott, Kansas, Labconco equipment can be found in academic, industrial, life science, pharmaceutical, environmental, forensic and clinical laboratories worldwide. About LabRoots LabRoots is the leading scientific social networking website, which provides daily scientific trending news and science-themed apparel, as well as produces educational virtual events and webinars, on the latest discoveries and advancements in science. Contributing to the advancement of science through content sharing capabilities, LabRoots is a powerful advocate in amplifying global networks and communities. Founded in 2008, LabRoots emphasizes digital innovation in scientific collaboration and learning, and is a primary source for current scientific news, webinars, virtual conferences, and more. LabRoots has grown into the world’s largest series of virtual events within the Life Sciences and Clinical Diagnostics community.


Patent
Institute for Environmental Health Inc. | Date: 2011-03-11

The invention provides methods for certification of carcasses, and for detecting a contaminated carcass and preventing its movement into or across a production area. The inventive methods comprise obtaining, early in the production process (pre-fabrication), a test sample from at least one test location of at least one split-portion of each carcass, wherein the test samples are obtained prior to or during chilling of the respective split portions, before entry thereof in the production chain. Composite test samples are assayed for pathogens or microbes, whereby certification is afforded, or whereby entry of the chilled split-carcass-Lot into the production area is precluded if the corresponding composite-Lot test sample is contaminated. Methods for remedial reconditioning of contaminated split-carcasses are provided, wherein essentially 100% of the carcasses are targeted to the production line. The inventive methods provide substantial public health benefit, and are efficient and economical to implement.


Patent
Institute for Environmental Health Inc. | Date: 2012-10-18

Provided are methods for growing and shipping sprouts and microgreens in the same container, growing while in shipment using moisture provided in a water-absorbent layer, with optional added beneficials, and including methods for producing sprouts and microgreens for consumption, and for pharmaceutical/nutriceutical use, comprising growth of sprouts in retail-ready containers, the container comprising a moisture-retaining layer of agar media or the like providing water for growth and obviating the need for irrigation during sprout growth. In certain aspects, media is supplemented with beneficial organisms or additives such as probiotic microbes, vitamins (e.g., B12), cofactors, nutrients, and other items (e.g., phytochemicals, natural colors, and antioxidants) which promote the growth of the beneficial microbes on the product, and/or which become incorporated into the product. In certain aspects, added beneficial microorganisms are selected to compete antagonize human pathogens such as Listeria, Salmonella, enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, Yersinia, and/or spoilage organisms (e.g., Erwinia, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas).


Particular aspects provide a method of sampling, testing and validating test lots (e.g., single-unit production lots), comprising: assembling a plurality of product portions from each of a plurality of test lots and combining the collected product portions to provide a corresponding set of test lot samples (wherein each test lot sample is attributed to a particular corresponding test lot); enriching the set of test lot samples; removing equal portions of each enriched sample, and combining the removed portions to provide a modular composite sample; and testing of the modular composite sample for the target agent/organism, wherein where such testing is positive, individual test lots may nonetheless yet be validated by further testing of a respective enriched test lot sample and obtaining a negative test result. The methods have broad utility for monitoring all sort of test lots (e.g., environmental lots, production lots, pharmaceutical lots, etc.) and for efficiently affecting informed, targeted remedial measures.


Patent
Institute for Environmental Health Inc. | Date: 2012-07-17

Provided are viscous and adherent food-safe antimicrobial compositions, and methods for using same in the immediate and residual decontamination of microbial-contaminated substrate surfaces, in reducing or precluding cutting implement-mediated transfer of surface contamination during cutting operations in the food industry, and for reducing or preventing transfer of contamination from contaminated surfaces in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Adherent antimicrobial protective layers are formed on substrate surfaces (e.g., processing equipment and utensils), providing a barrier (e.g., chemical and/or physical) to the passage or transport of microbial contamination between and among surfaces. The adherent formulations confer residual decontaminating activity, providing for prolonged killing of associated microbial contamination, are preferably formulated and applied as a gel, syrup or foam, and preferably comprise materials that are generally-regarded-as-safe (GRAS) in food products, obviating post-treatment removal prior to consumption. Preferably, the inventive formulations are heated to a temperature about 80 C. prior to application.


Patent
Institute for Environmental Health Inc. | Date: 2015-01-15

Aspects of the present invention provide novel multi-targeted microbiological screening and monitoring methods having substantial utility for monitoring and control of microbial growth and contaminants, microbiological processes, predictive microbiology, and for exposure and risk assessment. Microbial markers shared by both target and index microbes are used in novel methods for microbial monitoring, monitoring of microbial performance potential, trend analysis, and statistical process control (SPC) in processes or systems that are receptive to a plurality of genetically distinct microbes.


Particular aspects provide a method of sampling, testing and validating test lots (e.g., single-unit production lots), comprising: assembling a plurality of product portions from each of a plurality of test lots and combining the collected product portions to provide a corresponding set of test lot samples (wherein each test lot sample is attributed to a particular corresponding test lot); enriching the set of test lot samples; removing equal portions of each enriched sample, and combining the removed portions to provide a modular composite sample; and testing of the modular composite sample for the target agent/organism, wherein where such testing is positive, individual test lots may nonetheless yet be validated by further testing of a respective enriched test lot sample and obtaining a negative test result. The methods have broad utility for monitoring all sorts of test lots (e.g., environmental lots, production lots, pharmaceutical lots, etc.) and for efficiently affecting informed, targeted remedial measures.


Particular aspects provide a method of sampling, testing and validating test lots (e.g., single-unit production lots), comprising: assembling a plurality of product portions from each of a plurality of test lots and combining the collected product portions to provide a corresponding set of test lot samples (wherein each test lot sample is attributed to a particular corresponding test lot); enriching the set of test lot samples; removing equal portions of each enriched sample, and combining the removed portions to provide a modular composite sample; and testing of the modular composite sample for the target agent/organism, wherein where such testing is positive, individual test lots may nonetheless yet be validated by further testing of a respective enriched test lot sample and obtaining a negative test result. The methods have broad utility for monitoring all sorts of test lots (e.g., environmental lots, production lots, pharmaceutical lots, etc.) and for efficiently affecting informed, targeted remedial measures.


Patent
Institute for Environmental Health Inc. | Date: 2011-10-12

Aspects of the present invention provide novel multi-targeted microbiological screening and monitoring methods having substantial utility for monitoring and control of microbial growth and contaminants, microbiological processes, predictive microbiology, and for exposure and risk assessment. Microbial markers shared by both target and index microbes are used in novel methods for microbial monitoring, monitoring of microbial performance potential, trend analysis, and statistical process control (SPC) in processes or systems that are receptive to a plurality of genetically distinct microbes.

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