Time filter

Source Type

PubMed | a Institute for Environmental Health and Related Product Safety and Brown University
Type: | Journal: Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association (1995) | Year: 2016

Failure to consider the differences between indoor and outdoor PM2.5 may contribute to exposure misclassification in epidemiological studies estimating exposure from a central site measurement. This study was conducted in Beijing to investigate residential PM2.5 infiltration factor and to develop a localized predictive model in both non-heating and heating seasons. High variations of PM2.5 infiltration factor between the two seasons and across homes within each season were found, highlighting the importance of including infiltration factor into assessment of exposure to PM2.5 of outdoor origin in epidemiological studies. Localized predictive models for PM2.5 infiltration factor were also developed.

Loading a Institute for Environmental Health and Related Product Safety collaborators
Loading a Institute for Environmental Health and Related Product Safety collaborators