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PubMed | Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and Life Science Laboratory of the Institute for Computational Science and Technology at Ho Chi Minh City
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of chemical physics | Year: 2014

Antarctic bacterium antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect and support the survival of cold-adapted organisms by binding and inhibiting the growth of ice crystals. The mechanism of the anti-freezing process in a water environment at low temperature of Antarctic bacterium AFPs remains unclear. In this research, we study the effects of Antarctic bacterium AFPs by coarse grained simulations solution at a temperature range from 262 to 273K. The results indicated that Antarctic bacterium AFPs were fully active in temperatures greater than 265K. Additionally, the specific temperature ranges at which the water molecules become completely frozen, partially frozen, and not frozen were identified.

Loading Life Science Laboratory of the Institute for Computational Science and Technology at Ho Chi Minh City collaborators
Loading Life Science Laboratory of the Institute for Computational Science and Technology at Ho Chi Minh City collaborators