Research Institute for Clinical Research and Development

Magdeburg, Germany

Research Institute for Clinical Research and Development

Magdeburg, Germany
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Lennerz B.S.,University of Ulm | Wabitsch M.,University of Ulm | Lippert H.,Otto Von Guericke University of Magdeburg | Lippert H.,Institute for Quality Assurance in Surgical Medicine at the University Hospital | And 8 more authors.
International Journal of Obesity | Year: 2014

Objective:To examine the safety and effectiveness of adolescent bariatric surgery and to improve treatment recommendations for this age group.Design:Prospective longitudinal registry. Since January 2005, patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Germany are enlisted in an online registry called 'study for quality assurance in obesity surgeries'.Subjects:Adolescents and young adults up to the age of 21 years, operated from January 2005 to December 2010.Measurements:Weight, BMI, comorbidities, complication rates.Results:N=345 primary procedures were recorded by 58 hospitals. N=51 patients were under the age of 18 years. Follow-up information was available for 48% (n=167) of patients, with an average observation period of 544±412 days (median: 388 days). The most common surgical techniques were gastric banding (n=118, 34.2%), gastric bypass (n=116, 33.6%) and sleeve gastrectomy (n=78, 22.6%). Short-term complications (intra-operative; general postoperative; specific postoperative) were slightly lower for gastric banding (0.8%; 2.5%; 0.8%) than for gastric bypass (2.6%; 5.2%; 1.7%) or sleeve gastrectomy (0%; 9.0%; 7.7%). In accordance with published findings, weight and BMI reduction were lower for gastric banding (-28 kg; -9.5 kg m -2) compared to gastric bypass (-50 kg; -16.4 kg m -2) P< 0.001 or sleeve gastrectomy (-46 kg; -15.4 kg m -2) P< 0.001. Outcomes did not differ between the <18 and ≥18-year-old patients.Conclusion:Like in adults, bariatric surgery has low short-term complication rates and results in sustained weight loss in adolescents. However, the missing long-term observations prohibit a final conclusion about lasting effectiveness and safety. Clinical trials with structured follow-up programs and mechanisms to ascertain patient adherences are needed. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


PubMed | 1 Institute for Quality Assurance in Surgical Medicine at the University Hospital, Otto Von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Research Institute for Clinical Research and Development, University of Ulm and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of obesity (2005) | Year: 2014

To examine the safety and effectiveness of adolescent bariatric surgery and to improve treatment recommendations for this age group.Prospective longitudinal registry. Since January 2005, patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Germany are enlisted in an online registry called study for quality assurance in obesity surgeries.Adolescents and young adults up to the age of 21 years, operated from January 2005 to December 2010.Weight, BMI, comorbidities, complication rates.N=345 primary procedures were recorded by 58 hospitals. N=51 patients were under the age of 18 years. Follow-up information was available for 48% (n=167) of patients, with an average observation period of 544412 days (median: 388 days). The most common surgical techniques were gastric banding (n=118, 34.2%), gastric bypass (n=116, 33.6%) and sleeve gastrectomy (n=78, 22.6%). Short-term complications (intra-operative; general postoperative; specific postoperative) were slightly lower for gastric banding (0.8%; 2.5%; 0.8%) than for gastric bypass (2.6%; 5.2%; 1.7%) or sleeve gastrectomy (0%; 9.0%; 7.7%). In accordance with published findings, weight and BMI reduction were lower for gastric banding (-28kg; -9.5kgm(-2)) compared to gastric bypass (-50kg; -16.4kgm(-2)) P< 0.001 or sleeve gastrectomy (-46kg; -15.4kgm(-2)) P< 0.001. Outcomes did not differ between the <18 and 18-year-old patients.Like in adults, bariatric surgery has low short-term complication rates and results in sustained weight loss in adolescents. However, the missing long-term observations prohibit a final conclusion about lasting effectiveness and safety. Clinical trials with structured follow-up programs and mechanisms to ascertain patient adherences are needed.

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