Time filter

Source Type

Jedrychowski W.,Jagiellonian University | Maugeri U.,Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Mroz E.,Jagiellonian University | Flak E.,Jagiellonian University | And 3 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2012

The main goal of the study was to assess possible association between transplacental exposure to genotoxic PAH compounds assessed by the cord blood PAH-DNA adducts and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measured in healthy non-asthmatic children at the age of 7 years. The subjects included the subsample of 89 children who took part in the ongoing population based birth cohort study in Krakow and attended FeNO testing. The effect of transplacental PAH exposure was adjusted for potential confounders, such as maternal allergy and children's specific atopy to common domestic allergens. Results FeNO values were significantly elevated in children with higher prenatal PAH exposure (gmean = 7.7 ppb; 95% CI: 5.8-10.2 ppb) compared with those at low exposure level (gmean = 3.8 ppb; 95% CI: 2.3-6.3) (P = 0.011). Children with maternal allergy had also significantly higher mean FeNO values (gmean = 13.7 ppb, 95% CI: 8.8-21.4 ppb) compared with the subjects whose mothers denied allergy (gmean = 5.6 ppb, 95% CI: 4.3-7.3 ppb) (P = 0.012). Similarly, FeNO values in atopic children were higher (gmean = 11.2 ppb; 95% CI: 3.8-32.8 ppb) than in non-atopic individuals (gmean = 6.0 ppb; 95% CI: 4.7-7.7 ppb, P = 0.079). The results of the nested multivariable linear regression analysis showed that both maternal allergy and sensitization of children to domestic aeroallergens jointly explained 10.4% of FeNO variance, however, the additional 10.9% was determined by prenatal PAH exposure. Conclusion FeNO is more than a marker useful for screening atopy or symptomatic bronchial inflammation and may also be a proxy for cytokine deregulation and "allergic response" phenotype possibly established in fetal period due to transplacental PAH exposure. Preliminary results of our study should encourage more studies on intrauterine PAH exposure and later respiratory symptoms. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2012. 47:1131-1139. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Jedrychowski W.,Jagiellonian University | Maugeri U.,Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Zembala M.,Jagiellonian University | Klimaszewska-Rembiasz M.,Municipal Childrens Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology | Year: 2012

The goal of the study is to evaluate the importance of maternal atopy as a potential biological source of variability of exhaled FeNO values in healthy children who were non-asthmatic and non-sensitized to common domestic allergens. The study sample consisted of 61 seven-year old children. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has been measured by NObreath (Bedfont portable device). Children with reported maternal atopy had significantly higher mean FeNO values (geometric mean =10.7 ppb; 95%CI: 6.7-17.1 ppb) than those who denied it (geometric mean =5.2 ppb 95%CI: 3.9-6.9 ppb) (p=0.010). Neither the correlation between FeNO values and gender, respiratory and eczema symptoms, nor ETS exposure in the prenatal and postnatal period or body mass of children were significant. We also found no significant association of FeNO values with the amount of common domestic allergens measured in the households. The results of the ROC analysis suggested 11 ppb as the cut-off point for FeNO to distinguish groups of healthy children with and without maternal atopy. In conclusion, our study provided some evidence suggesting that maternal atopy may affect FeNO level in children independently of asthma and sensitization status to common domestic allergens. The data should be considered in the interpretation of FeNO levels in clinical practice and setting up FeNO screening criteria for identification of eosinophilic airway inflammation.


Jedrychowski W.A.,Jagiellonian University | Maugeri U.,Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Spengler J.,Harvard University | Mroz E.,Jagiellonian University | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health | Year: 2013

Objectives: The main goal of the study was to assess possible association between fetal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO) measured in non-asthmatic children. Material and Methods: The subjects include 118 children taking part in an ongoing population-based birth cohort study in Kraków. Personal samplers of PM2.5 were used to measure fine particle mass in the fetal period and carbon monoxide (CO) in exhaled breath from a single exhalation effort at the age of 7. In the statistical analysis of the effect of prenatal PM2.5 exposure on eCO, a set of potential confounders, such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), city residence area, sensitization to house dust allergens and the occurrence of respiratory symptoms monitored over the seven-year follow-up was considered. Results: The level of eCO did not correlate with the self-reported ETS exposure recorded over the follow-up, however, there was a positive significant relationship with the prenatal PM2.5 exposure (non-parametric trend p = 0.042). The eCO mean level was higher in atopic children (geometric mean = 2.06 ppm, 95% CI: 1.58-2.66 ppm) than in non-atopic ones (geometric mean = 1.57 ppm, 95% CI: 1.47-1.73 ppm) and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.036). As for the respiratory symptoms, eCO values were associated positively only with the cough severity score recorded in the follow-up (nonparametric trend p = 0.057). In the nested multivariable linear regression model, only the effects of prenatal PM2.5 and cough severity recorded in the follow-up were related to eCO level. The prenatal PM2.5 exposure represented 5.1%, while children's cough represented only 2.6% of the eCO variability. Conclusion: Our study suggests that elevated eCO in non-asthmatic children may result from oxidative stress experienced in the fetal period and that heme oxygenase (HO) activity in body tissues may be programmed in the fetal period by the exposure to fine particulate matter. © 2013 Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien.


Jedrychowski W.,Jagiellonian University | Perera F.,Columbia University | Maugeri U.,Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Mrozek-Budzyn D.,Jagiellonian University | And 5 more authors.
International Archives of Allergy and Immunology | Year: 2011

Background: As there is a scarcity of evidence on potential hazards and preventive factors for infantile eczema operating in the prenatal period, the main goal of this study was to assess the role of prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the occurrence of infant eczema jointly with the possible modulating effect of maternal fish consumption. Methods: The study sample consisted of 469 women enrolled during pregnancy, who gave birth to term babies (>36 weeks of gestation). Among all pregnant women recruited, personal measurements of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) were performed over 48 h in the second trimester of pregnancy. After delivery, every 3 months in the first year of the newborn's life, a detailed, standardized, face-to-face interview was administered to each mother, in the process of which a trained interviewer recorded any history of infantile eczema and data on potential environmental hazards. The estimated risk of eczema related to higher prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 >53.0 μg/m 3) and postnatal ETS as well as the protective effect of maternal fish intake were adjusted for potential confounders in a multivariable logistic regression model. Results: While the separate effects of higher prenatal PM 2.5 and postnatal ETS exposure were not statistically significant, their joint effect appeared to have a significant influence on the occurrence of infantile eczema [odds ratio 2.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-5.18]. With maternal fish intake of more than 205 g/week, the risk of eczema decreased by 43% (odds ratio 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.93). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for eczema symptoms, estimated from the Poisson regression model, was increased with both higher exposure to prenatal PM 2.5 and postnatal ETS (IRR 1.55, 95% CI 0.99-2.44) and in children of atopic mothers (IRR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.75) but was lower in girls (IRR 0.78, 95% CI 0.61-1.00). The observed preventive effect of fish consumption on the frequency of eczema symptoms was consistent with the results of the logistic analysis (IRR 0.72, 95% CI 0.52-0.99). Conclusions: The findings indicate that higher prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter combined with postnatal exposure to ETS may increase the risk of infant eczema, while maternal fish intake during pregnancy may reduce the risk of infantile eczema. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG.


Jedrychowski W.,Jagiellonian University | Perera F.,Columbia University | Maugeri U.,Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Miller R.L.,Columbia University | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Research | Year: 2011

Background: Several in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that metal-rich particles may enhance allergic responses to house dust mites and induce an increased release of allergy-related cytokines. Objectives: The main goal of this analysis is to define the possible association of intrauterine exposure to lead and mercury with the occurrence of skin sensitization to common aeroallergens in early childhood. Material and methods: The present study refers to a sample of 224 women in the second trimester of pregnancy recruited from Krakow inner city area who had full term pregnancies and whose children underwent skin prick testing (SPT) at the age of 5. Lead and mercury levels were assessed in cord blood and retested in children at age of 5 years. Aeroallergen concentrations in house dust were measured at the age of 3 years. The main health outcome (atopic status) was defined as the positive SPT to at least one common aeroallergen (Der f1, Der p1, Can f1 and Fel d1) at the age of 5 years. In the statistical analysis of the association between atopic status of children and exposure to metals, the study considered a set of covariates such as maternal characteristics (age, education, atopy), child's gender, number of older siblings, prenatal (measured via cord blood cotinine) and postnatal environmental tobacco smoke together with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as measured by PAH-DNA adducts. Results and conclusion: In the binary regression analysis, which controlled for the confounders, the risk ratio (RR) estimate for atopic sensitization was significantly associated with the lead exposure (RR=2.25, 95%CI: 1.21-4.19). In conclusion, the data suggest that even very low-level of prenatal lead exposure may be implicated in enhancing sensitization to common aeroallergens in early childhood. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Jedrychowski W.,Jagiellonian University | Spengler J.D.,Boston University | Maugeri U.,Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Miller R.L.,Columbia University | And 7 more authors.
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2011

The goal of the study was to test the hypothesis that prenatal Paracetamol exposure increases the risk of developing eczema in early childhood and that this association may be stronger in children who are exposed in fetal period to higher concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5). The study sample consisted of 322 women recruited from January 2001 to February 2004 in the Krakow inner city area who gave birth to term babies and completed 5-year follow-up. Paracetamol use in pregnancy was collected by interviews and prenatal personal exposure to PM 2.5 over 48h was measured in recruited women in the second trimester of pregnancy. After delivery, every three months in the first 24months of the newborn's life and every 6months later, a detailed standardized face-to-face interview on the infant's health was administered to each mother by trained interviewers. During the interviews at each of the study periods after birth, a history of eczema was recorded.The incident rate ratio (IRR) for frequency of eczema events over the follow-up was estimated from the Poisson regression model and the overall effect of main exposure variables on eczema was assessed by odds ratios (ORs) by the logistic model. The estimated relative risk of eczema occurring whenever in the follow-up was related significantly neither with prenatal Paracetamol nor higher PM 2.5 exposure, however, their joint effect was significant (OR interaction term=6.04; 95%CI: 1.04-35.16). Of potential confounders considered in the analysis only damp/moldy home significantly increased the risk of eczema (OR=1.53; 95%CI: 1.14-2.05). In contrast, there was an inverse significant association between the presence of older siblings and eczema (OR=0.55; 95%CI: 0.35-0.84). The joint effect of the main exposure variables significantly increased frequency of eczema events (IRR=1.78, 95%CI: 1.22-2.61).In conclusion, the findings of the study suggest that Paracetamol use by mothers in pregnancy is not an independent risk factor for eczema in children, however, even very small doses of Paracetamol taken in pregnancy may contribute to the occurrence of allergic symptoms in early childhood if there is prenatal co-exposure to higher airborne fine particulate matter. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Jedrychowski W.,Jagiellonian University | Maugeri U.,International Center for Studies and Research in Biomedicine | Maugeri U.,Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation | Kaim I.,Jagiellonian University | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology | Year: 2011

Gestational weight gain (GWG) is important for health policy as it may be associated with overweight epidemics in childhood and adolescence. The purpose of the study was to perform the risk assessment of joint effects of the excessive GWG and the pregravid maternal BMI on overweight in infancy and childhood. The observations were collected in the ongoing prospective birth cohort study of 482 non-smoking mothers and their newborns in Cracow inner city area. At 5 years of age the subsample of 312 infants were reexamined in order to assess their nutritional status. Body fatness was assessed by means of the weight/length ratio (WLR) in neonates and weight/height ratio (WHR) in 5-year-olds since they showed the strongest correlation with subcutaneous fat mass of young children. In the statistical analysis the binary regression models were applied to identify predictors of overweight. The excessive GWG (>18 kg) increased more than twofold the adjusted relative risk (RR) of neonatal fatness (R=2.7; 95% CI 2.0-3.7) and was also a significant independent risk factor for postnatal body fatness at 5 years of age (RR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.3-3.3). The results confirmed earlier findings that pregravid overweight increased not only the relative risk of neonatal fatness (RR=2.9; 95% CI: 2.2- 3.9) but also overweight in early childhood (RR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.7-4.4). The conclusion is that excessive GWG may be a risk factor for overweight in early childhood and should be a focus of public health policy.

Loading Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation collaborators
Loading Institute for Clinical Medicine and Rehabilitation collaborators