Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention

Firenze, Italy

Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention

Firenze, Italy
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Toccafondi A.,Centro Studi e Ricerca Synthesis | Bonacchi A.,Centro Studi e Ricerca Synthesis | Bonacchi A.,Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention | Mambrini A.,Azienda Unita Sanitaria Locale AUSL 1 | And 3 more authors.
Palliative and Supportive Care | Year: 2017

Objective:: The present study intended to evaluate the impact of a standardized format—called the “Music Givers,” based on a single session of music intervention followed by a buffet—on the psychological burden and well-being of hospitalized cancer patients. Method:: The Distress Thermometer (DT), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and self-reported visual analogue scales (score range = 1–10) to assess pain, fatigue, and five areas of well-being (i.e., physical, psychological, relational, spiritual, and overall well-being) were administered to 242 cancer patients upon admission to and at discharge from the hospital. Among them, 103 were hospitalized during which time a live concert took place (intervention group), whereas 139 patients were hospitalized when it did not (control group). Results:: Compared to the control group, patients in the intervention group demonstrated less distress at discharge according to the DT (adjusted estimate of difference = –0.8, p = 0.001), lower HADS–Anxiety (–1.7, p < 0.001) and HADS–Depression scores (–1.3, p = 0.001), and higher scores on all the well-being scales, with the exception of spiritual well-being. In addition, no between-group differences were found in terms of pain and fatigue scores at discharge. Significance of results:: The one-session format of the Music Givers intervention is an effective, standardized, easy-to-replicate, and low-cost intervention that reduces psychological burden and improves the well-being of hospitalized cancer patients. Listening to live music and the opportunity to establish better relationships between patients and staff could explain these results. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017


Caini S.,Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention | Masala G.,Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention | Gnagnarella P.,Italian National Cancer Institute | Ermini I.,Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention | And 3 more authors.
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology | Year: 2016

Background: Several studies investigated whether the consumption of foods of animal origin affects the risk of haematological malignancies, with conflicting results. To help clarify this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of observational studies published until November 2014 that investigated the association between the consumption of foods of animal origin (red, processed and white meat, fish and seafood, dairy products and eggs) and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its major subtypes and multiple myeloma among adults. Methods: We calculated summary relative risks (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) by using random effect models with maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Overall, 16,525 non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 3665 multiple myeloma cases from thirty-three independent studies were included. We found an association between consumption of red meat and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.22, 95% CI 1.03-1.44, I2 = 35%). The consumption of fish and seafood was inversely associated with the risk of multiple myeloma (SRR 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-1.00, I2 = 82%), although the between-studies heterogeneity was high. Finally, the consumption of dairy products was positively associated, with borderline significance, with the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.26, 95% CI 0.99-1.60, I2 = 49%). Conclusions: Foods of animal origin likely play a role in the aetiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma, with red meat and dairy tending to increase the risk, and fish that tends to decrease it. Our findings reinforce the recommendations to reduce the consumption of red meat by replacing it with vegetables, legumes and fish. © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Caini S.,Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention | Boniol M.,International Prevention Research Institute | Botteri E.,Italian National Cancer Institute | Tosti G.,Italian National Cancer Institute | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Dermatological Science | Year: 2014

The number of cutaneous melanoma survivors has been increasing for years due to improvements in early diagnosis and subsequent prolonged survival. These patients are at increased risk of developing a second melanoma and a second primary malignancy (SPM) at other sites as well. We performed a review of scientific literature and meta-analysis to evaluate the risk of developing a SPM (other than melanoma) among melanoma patients. Twenty-three independent papers and over 350,000 melanoma patients were included. Risk of cancer among melanoma survivors was increased overall (1.57, 95% CI 1.29-1.90) and at several sites: bone (2.09, 95% CI 1.08-4.05), non-melanoma skin cancer (4.01, 95% CI 1.81-8.87), soft tissue (6.80, 95% CI 1.29-35.98), colon-rectum (1.12, 95% CI 1.00-1.25), female breast (1.14, 95% CI 1.07-1.22), kidney (1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.45), prostate (1.25, 95% CI 1.13-1.37) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54). The overall risk of SPM showed a tendency to decrease as the time from melanoma diagnosis lengthened. Most of our findings may be explained by the tendency of some exposures, which are risk factors for different tumors, to occur simultaneously in the same individuals. These results suggest primary and secondary cancer prevention counselling for melanoma survivors. © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology.


Caini S.,Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention | Radice D.,Italian National Cancer Institute | Tosti G.,Italian National Cancer Institute | Spadola G.,Italian National Cancer Institute | And 9 more authors.
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology | Year: 2016

Background: The number of melanoma survivors has been increasing for decades due to early diagnosis and improved survival. These patients have an increased risk of developing a second primary cancer (SPC); also, melanoma is frequently diagnosed among patients firstly diagnosed with an extracutaneous malignancy. Objective: We evaluated the risk of developing a SPC among 1537 melanoma patients, and the risk of second primary melanoma (SPM) in 52 354 extracutaneous cancer patients, who were treated at the European Institute of Oncology in Milan, Italy, during 2000–2010. Material and methods: We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) by applying gender-, age-, year- and region-specific reference rates to the follow-up time accrued between the diagnosis of the first and the second primary malignancies. Results: Seventy-six SPC were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 4 years, of which 49 (64%) during the first 2 years upon melanoma diagnosis. The SIR was increased for cancer of breast (4.10, 95% CI 2.79–6.03), thyroid (4.67, 95% CI 1.94–11.22), brain (6.13, 95% CI 2.30–16.33) and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (3.12, 95% CI 1.30–7.50). During a median follow-up of 4 years, 127 SPM were diagnosed: thick lesions were less frequent than for melanoma diagnosed as first cancer. The SIR was increased for cancer of breast (5.13, 95%CI 3.91–6.73), thyroid (16.2, 95%CI: 5.22–50.2), head and neck (5.62, 95%CI 1.41–22.50), soft tissue (8.68, 95%CI 2.17–34.70), cervix (12.5, 95% CI 3.14–50.20), kidney (3.19, 95%CI 1.52–6.68), prostate (4.36, 95%CI 2.63–7.24) and acute myeloid leukaemia (6.44, 95%CI 2.42–17.20). Conclusions: The most likely causes of these associations are the clustering of lifestyle risk factors in the same subgroups of population, mainly on a sociocultural basis and surveillance bias. This raises important questions about how to best follow cancer survivors by avoiding an inefficient use of resources and an excessive medicalization of these patients' lives. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology


PubMed | Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention and Italian National Cancer Institute
Type: | Journal: Critical reviews in oncology/hematology | Year: 2016

Several studies investigated whether the consumption of foods of animal origin affects the risk of haematological malignancies, with conflicting results. To help clarify this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of observational studies published until November 2014 that investigated the association between the consumption of foods of animal origin (red, processed and white meat, fish and seafood, dairy products and eggs) and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its major subtypes and multiple myeloma among adults.We calculated summary relative risks (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) by using random effect models with maximum likelihood estimation.Overall, 16,525 non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 3665 multiple myeloma cases from thirty-three independent studies were included. We found an association between consumption of red meat and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.22, 95% CI 1.03-1.44, I(2)=35%). The consumption of fish and seafood was inversely associated with the risk of multiple myeloma (SRR 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-1.00, I(2)=82%), although the between-studies heterogeneity was high. Finally, the consumption of dairy products was positively associated, with borderline significance, with the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.26, 95% CI 0.99-1.60, I(2)=49%).Foods of animal origin likely play a role in the aetiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma, with red meat and dairy tending to increase the risk, and fish that tends to decrease it. Our findings reinforce the recommendations to reduce the consumption of red meat by replacing it with vegetables, legumes and fish.


PubMed | University of L'Aquila, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention and Italian National Cancer Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV | Year: 2016

The number of melanoma survivors has been increasing for decades due to early diagnosis and improved survival. These patients have an increased risk of developing a second primary cancer (SPC); also, melanoma is frequently diagnosed among patients firstly diagnosed with an extracutaneous malignancy.We evaluated the risk of developing a SPC among 1537 melanoma patients, and the risk of second primary melanoma (SPM) in 52 354 extracutaneous cancer patients, who were treated at the European Institute of Oncology in Milan, Italy, during 2000-2010.We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) by applying gender-, age-, year- and region-specific reference rates to the follow-up time accrued between the diagnosis of the first and the second primary malignancies.Seventy-six SPC were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 4 years, of which 49 (64%) during the first 2 years upon melanoma diagnosis. The SIR was increased for cancer of breast (4.10, 95% CI 2.79-6.03), thyroid (4.67, 95% CI 1.94-11.22), brain (6.13, 95% CI 2.30-16.33) and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (3.12, 95% CI 1.30-7.50). During a median follow-up of 4 years, 127 SPM were diagnosed: thick lesions were less frequent than for melanoma diagnosed as first cancer. The SIR was increased for cancer of breast (5.13, 95%CI 3.91-6.73), thyroid (16.2, 95%CI: 5.22-50.2), head and neck (5.62, 95%CI 1.41-22.50), soft tissue (8.68, 95%CI 2.17-34.70), cervix (12.5, 95% CI 3.14-50.20), kidney (3.19, 95%CI 1.52-6.68), prostate (4.36, 95%CI 2.63-7.24) and acute myeloid leukaemia (6.44, 95%CI 2.42-17.20).The most likely causes of these associations are the clustering of lifestyle risk factors in the same subgroups of population, mainly on a sociocultural basis and surveillance bias. This raises important questions about how to best follow cancer survivors by avoiding an inefficient use of resources and an excessive medicalization of these patients lives.


Broeders M.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Broeders M.,Dutch Reference Center for Screening | Paci E.,Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention
Women's Health | Year: 2015

Breast cancer screening programs are still object of harsh debate. In 2012, the Independent UK Panel reviewed the benefits and harms of mammography screening based on randomized trials and the EUROSCREEN Working Group reviewed European observational outcome studies. The conclusion was that screening programs should continue, while acknowledging that harms, such as the occurrence of false-positive results and overdiagnosis, can have a negative impact on a woman's life. Information on the balance sheet of the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening should help women and their physicians to make an informed choice. The future challenge for breast screening programs is to assess the feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness and impact of risk-based screening in order to maximize benefit-to-harm ratios. © 2015 Future Medicine Ltd.

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