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Ruiz-Hernandez A.,Hospital Clinico Of Valencia | Ruiz-Hernandez A.,Institute For Biomedical Research Hospital Clinic Of Valencia Incliva | Kuo C.-C.,Johns Hopkins University | Kuo C.-C.,China Medical University at Taichung | And 11 more authors.
Clinical Epigenetics | Year: 2015

Current evidence supports the notion that environmental exposures are associated with DNA-methylation and expression changes that can impact human health. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of epidemiologic studies evaluating the association between environmental chemicals with DNA methylation levels in adults. After excluding arsenic, recently evaluated in a systematic review, we identified a total of 17 articles (6 on cadmium, 4 on lead, 2 on mercury, 1 on nickel, 1 on antimony, 1 on tungsten, 5 on persistent organic pollutants and perfluorinated compounds, 1 on bisphenol A, and 3 on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). The selected articles reported quantitative methods to determine DNA methylation including immunocolorimetric assays for total content of genomic DNA methylation, and microarray technologies, methylation-specific quantitative PCR, Luminometric Methylation Assay (LUMA), and bisulfite pyrosequencing for DNA methylation content of genomic sites such as gene promoters, LINE-1, Alu elements, and others. Considering consistency, temporality, strength, dose-response relationship, and biological plausibility, we concluded that the current evidence is not sufficient to provide inference because differences across studies and limited samples sizes make it difficult to compare across studies and to evaluate sources of heterogeneity. Important questions for future research include the need for larger and longitudinal studies, the validation of findings, and the systematic evaluation of the dose-response relationships. Future studies should also consider the evaluation of epigenetic marks recently in the research spotlight such as DNA hydroxymethylation and the role of underlying genetic variants. © 2015 Ruiz-Hernandez et al.


Galan-Chilet I.,Institute for Biomedical Research INCLIVA | Tellez-Plaza M.,Institute for Biomedical Research INCLIVA | De Marco G.,Institute for Biomedical Research INCLIVA | Lopez-Izquierdo R.,Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega | And 14 more authors.
Free Radical Biology and Medicine | Year: 2014

The role of selenium exposure in preventing chronic disease is controversial, especially in selenium-repleted populations. At high concentrations, selenium exposure may increase oxidative stress. Studies evaluating the interaction of genetic variation in genes involved in oxidative stress pathways and selenium are scarce. We evaluated the cross-sectional association of plasma selenium concentrations with oxidative stress levels, measured as oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio (GSSG/GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-dG) in urine, and the interacting role of genetic variation in oxidative stress candidate genes, in a representative sample of 1445 men and women aged 18-85 years from Spain. The geometric mean of plasma selenium levels in the study sample was 84.76 μg/L. In fully adjusted models the geometric mean ratios for oxidative stress biomarker levels comparing the highest to the lowest quintiles of plasma selenium levels were 0.61 (0.50-0.76) for GSSG/GSH, 0.89 (0.79-1.00) for MDA, and 1.06 (0.96-1.18) for 8-oxo-dG. We observed nonlinear dose-responses of selenium exposure and oxidative stress biomarkers, with plasma selenium concentrations above ~110 μg/L being positively associated with 8-oxo-dG, but inversely associated with GSSG/GSH and MDA. In addition, we identified potential risk genotypes associated with increased levels of oxidative stress markers with high selenium levels. Our findings support that high selenium levels increase oxidative stress in some biological processes. More studies are needed to disentangle the complexity of selenium biology and the relevance of potential gene-selenium interactions in relation to health outcomes in human populations. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Institute for Biomedical Research INCLIVA, Northwestern University and Medical University of Vienna
Type: | Journal: Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association | Year: 2016

Patients undergoing hemodialysis and kidney graft recipients are high-risk populations for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), osteoprotegerin (OPG), RANK ligand, osteopontin (OPN), Klotho protein and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) are bone- and vascular-derived molecular biomarkers that have been shown to be associated with cardiovascular surrogate end points; however, currently available data on the prognostic value of these biomarkers is inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis in order to summarize the available evidence on the association of molecular biomarkers with mortality in individuals undergoing hemodialysis and renal transplant patients.Two databases (MEDLINE and Embase) were systematically searched. Studies were eligible if the association of biomarker and mortality was reported as time-to-event data [hazard Ratio (HR)] or as effect size with a fixed time of follow-up [odds Ratio (OR)]. Abstracted HRs were converted onto a standard scale of effect and combined using a random effects model.From a total of 1170 studies identified in initial searches, 21 met the inclusion criteria. In hemodialysis patients, comparing the lower third with the upper third of baseline FGF23 distribution, pooled HRs (95% confidence intervals) were 1.94 (1.47, 2.56) for all-cause mortality and 2.4 (1.64, 3.51) for cardiovascular mortality. For the same comparison of baseline OPG distribution, pooled HRs were 1.8 (0.95, 3.39) for all-cause mortality and 2.53 (1.29, 4.94) for cardiovascular mortality. Reported risk estimates of RANK ligand, OPN, Klotho protein and BMP-7 were not suitable for pooling; however, only Klotho protein was significantly related to mortality. For kidney graft recipients, four studies that investigated the relationship of FGF23 and OPG with mortality were identified, all of which reported a significant association.In hemodialysis patients, FGF23 is a predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, whereas the predictive value of OPG is restricted to cardiovascular mortality. Further studies are needed in order to gain insight into the prognostic value of these biomarkers in renal transplant recipients.


PubMed | Institute for Biomedical Research INCLIVA, Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, Hospital Regional Universitario Of Malaga, University of Valencia and CIBER ISCIII
Type: | Journal: Free radical biology & medicine | Year: 2014

The role of selenium exposure in preventing chronic disease is controversial, especially in selenium-repleted populations. At high concentrations, selenium exposure may increase oxidative stress. Studies evaluating the interaction of genetic variation in genes involved in oxidative stress pathways and selenium are scarce. We evaluated the cross-sectional association of plasma selenium concentrations with oxidative stress levels, measured as oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio (GSSG/GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-dG) in urine, and the interacting role of genetic variation in oxidative stress candidate genes, in a representative sample of 1445 men and women aged 18-85 years from Spain. The geometric mean of plasma selenium levels in the study sample was 84.76 g/L. In fully adjusted models the geometric mean ratios for oxidative stress biomarker levels comparing the highest to the lowest quintiles of plasma selenium levels were 0.61 (0.50-0.76) for GSSG/GSH, 0.89 (0.79-1.00) for MDA, and 1.06 (0.96-1.18) for 8-oxo-dG. We observed nonlinear dose-responses of selenium exposure and oxidative stress biomarkers, with plasma selenium concentrations above ~110 g/L being positively associated with 8-oxo-dG, but inversely associated with GSSG/GSH and MDA. In addition, we identified potential risk genotypes associated with increased levels of oxidative stress markers with high selenium levels. Our findings support that high selenium levels increase oxidative stress in some biological processes. More studies are needed to disentangle the complexity of selenium biology and the relevance of potential gene-selenium interactions in relation to health outcomes in human populations.

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