Time filter

Source Type

Boraschi D.,CNR Institute of Biomedical Technologies | Del Giudice G.,Novartis | Dutel C.,Fondation Merieux | Ivanoff B.,Institute for Biomedical Aging Research | And 2 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2010

Among the greatest achievements of the 20th century, prolongation of life expectancy has been the result of improved health conditions, decreased childhood mortality, lower incidence of infectious diseases. The consequence is the rapid ageing of the world population, with the elderly representing over 25% of the entire population by the year 2030, of which 75% living in less developed countries. Ageing thus represents one of the major public health challenges of the 21st century. Indeed, unhealthy ageing and frailty of the aged population has an important impact on the economic development and social costs of a country, a problem even more acute in less developed countries. A better knowledge of immune senescence and the design of customised vaccination strategies for the elderly are the immediate challenges posed to scientists and physicians. The conference "Ageing and immunity", recently held in Siena (Italy), has addressed these issues and defined the global strategic priorities for research and health policies aimed at ensuring healthy ageing.


Wagner W.,RWTH Aachen | Bork S.,University of Heidelberg | Lepperdinger G.,Institute for Biomedical Aging Research | Joussen S.,RWTH Aachen | And 3 more authors.
Aging | Year: 2010

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are currently tested in a large number of clinical trials and raise high hope inregenerative medicine. These cells have to be expanded in vitro before transplantation and several studies demonstratedthat long-term culture evokes continuous changes in MSC: proliferation rate decays, the cell size increases, differentiationpotential is affected, chromosomal instabilities may arise and molecular changes are acquired. Long-term culture of cellpreparations might also have therapeutic consequences, although this has hardly been addressed in ongoing trials so far. Reliable therapeutic regimens necessitate quality control of cellular products. This research perspective summarizesavailable methods to track cellular aging of MSC. We have demonstrated that gene expression changes [1] and epigeneticmodifications [2] are continuously acquired during replicative senescence. Molecular analysis of a suitable panel of genesmight provide a robust tool to assess efficiency and safety of long-term expansion. © Wagner et al.


Greussing R.,Institute for Biomedical Aging Research | Unterluggauer H.,Institute for Biomedical Aging Research | Koziel R.,Institute for Biomedical Aging Research | Maier A.B.,Leiden University | Jansen-Durr P.,Institute for Biomedical Aging Research
Journal of Visualized Experiments | Year: 2012

Proteasome is the main intracellular organelle involved in the proteolytic degradation of abnormal, misfolded, damaged or oxidized proteins 1, 2. Maintenance of proteasome activity was implicated in many key cellular processes, like cell's stress response 3, cell cycle regulation and cellular differentiation 4 or in immune system response 5. The dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has been related to the development of tumors and neurodegenerative diseases 4, 6. Additionally, a decrease in proteasome activity was found as a feature of cellular senescence and organismal aging 7, 8, 9, 10. Here, we present a method to measure ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living cells using a GFP-dgn fusion protein. To be able to monitor ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living primary cells, complementary DNA constructs coding for a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-dgn fusion protein (GFP-dgn, unstable) and a variant carrying a frameshift mutation (GFP-dgnFS, stable 11) are inserted in lentiviral expression vectors. We prefer this technique over traditional transfection techniques because it guarantees a very high transfection efficiency independent of the cell type or the age of the donor. The difference between fluorescence displayed by the GFP-dgnFS (stable) protein and the destabilized protein (GFP-dgn) in the absence or presence of proteasome inhibitor can be used to estimate ubiquitin-proteasome activity in each particular cell strain. These differences can be monitored by epifluorescence microscopy or can be measured by flow cytometry.


PubMed | Institute for Biomedical Aging Research
Type: | Journal: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE | Year: 2012

Proteasome is the main intracellular organelle involved in the proteolytic degradation of abnormal, misfolded, damaged or oxidized proteins (1, 2). Maintenance of proteasome activity was implicated in many key cellular processes, like cells stress response (3), cell cycle regulation and cellular differentiation (4) or in immune system response (5). The dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has been related to the development of tumors and neurodegenerative diseases (4, 6). Additionally, a decrease in proteasome activity was found as a feature of cellular senescence and organismal aging (7, 8, 9, 10). Here, we present a method to measure ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living cells using a GFP-dgn fusion protein. To be able to monitor ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living primary cells, complementary DNA constructs coding for a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-dgn fusion protein (GFP-dgn, unstable) and a variant carrying a frameshift mutation (GFP-dgnFS, stable (11)) are inserted in lentiviral expression vectors. We prefer this technique over traditional transfection techniques because it guarantees a very high transfection efficiency independent of the cell type or the age of the donor. The difference between fluorescence displayed by the GFP-dgnFS (stable) protein and the destabilized protein (GFP-dgn) in the absence or presence of proteasome inhibitor can be used to estimate ubiquitin-proteasome activity in each particular cell strain. These differences can be monitored by epifluorescence microscopy or can be measured by flow cytometry.


Greussing R.,Institute for Biomedical Aging Research
Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE | Year: 2012

Proteasome is the main intracellular organelle involved in the proteolytic degradation of abnormal, misfolded, damaged or oxidized proteins (1, 2). Maintenance of proteasome activity was implicated in many key cellular processes, like cell's stress response (3), cell cycle regulation and cellular differentiation (4) or in immune system response (5). The dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has been related to the development of tumors and neurodegenerative diseases (4, 6). Additionally, a decrease in proteasome activity was found as a feature of cellular senescence and organismal aging (7, 8, 9, 10). Here, we present a method to measure ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living cells using a GFP-dgn fusion protein. To be able to monitor ubiquitin-proteasome activity in living primary cells, complementary DNA constructs coding for a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-dgn fusion protein (GFP-dgn, unstable) and a variant carrying a frameshift mutation (GFP-dgnFS, stable (11)) are inserted in lentiviral expression vectors. We prefer this technique over traditional transfection techniques because it guarantees a very high transfection efficiency independent of the cell type or the age of the donor. The difference between fluorescence displayed by the GFP-dgnFS (stable) protein and the destabilized protein (GFP-dgn) in the absence or presence of proteasome inhibitor can be used to estimate ubiquitin-proteasome activity in each particular cell strain. These differences can be monitored by epifluorescence microscopy or can be measured by flow cytometry.


PubMed | Hospital Traunstein, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research, Innsbruck Medical University and University of Salzburg
Type: | Journal: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology and oral radiology | Year: 2017

Radiation therapy (RT) of the head and neck region is often accompanied by serious side effects. Research in this area is needed to improve treatment outcomes and ameliorate therapy tolerance. Laboratory rodents are barely matching todays clinical standards in RT research. Yet domestic swine (Sus scrofa domestica) have previously proved suitable for various advanced tests in clinical research and training. We therefore investigated whether S. scrofa domestica is also appropriate for irradiation of the mandible.A common scheme for irradiation treatment of S. scrofa domestica mandibles in a split-mouth design was acquired by applying computed tomography (CT) scanning under sedation. Basing on close anatomic resemblance, a standard treatment plan comprising 2 opposed irradiation fields could be accomplished.RT was carried out in a clinical environment with 29Gy. The resulting operating procedure facilitated complication-free sedation, transport, positioning, CT scanning, and effective irradiation.Based on common standards applied for RT in humans, domestic pigs can be employed to progress RT clinical research. Due to their human-like anatomy, physiology, size, and weight, the swine model is expedient for advancing experimental RT of the head and neck area.


Dysregulation of the IGF axis is implicated in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), 2 of the most common diseases affecting elderly males. PCa is the second leading cause of male-related cancer death in Western societies. Although distinct pathologies, BPH and PCa are both characterized by extensive stromal remodeling, in particular fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation, thought to be induced by elevated local production of TGF1. We previously showed that TGF1-mediated fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation of primary human prostatic stromal cells resulted in the dsyregulation of several components of the IGF axis, including the induction of IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP3). Using isoform-specific lentiviral-mediated knockdown, we demonstrate herein that IGFBP3 is essential for TGF1-mediated differentiation. Although recombinant human IGFBP3 alone was not sufficient to induce differentiation, IGFBP3 synergistically potentiated TGF1-mediated stromal remodeling predominantly via an IGF-independent mechanism. Consistent with these in vitro findings, IGFBP3 immunohistochemistry revealed elevated levels of IGFBP3 in the hyperplastic fibromuscular stroma of BPH specimens and in the tumor-adjacent stroma of high-grade PCa. Collectively these data indicate that the dysregulation of the stromal IGF axis, in particular elevated IGFBP3, plays a crucial role in fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation in the diseased prostatic stroma and indicate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting stromal remodeling and the resulting dysregulation of the stromal IGF axis as a novel strategy for the treatment of advanced PCa and BPH.

Loading Institute for Biomedical Aging Research collaborators
Loading Institute for Biomedical Aging Research collaborators