Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Port Glasgow, United Kingdom

Tan M.K.,National University of Singapore | Kamaruddin K.N.,Institute for Biodiversity
Zootaxa | Year: 2013

Material based on a taxonomic collection in Bukit Fraser, Pahang of Malay Peninsula enables the review of two genera of bush katydid (Phaneropterinae). The female of Elimaea (Rhaebelimaea) pseudochloris Ingrisch, 1998 is described and recorded for the first time outside its type locality, Thailand. One new species of Pseudopsyra from Bukit Fraser is described: Pseudopsyra bispina sp. n. Copyright © 2013 Magnolia Press. Source


Tan M.K.,National University of Singapore | Kamaruddin K.N.,Institute for Biodiversity
Zootaxa | Year: 2013

One new species of Gryllotalpa from Bukit Fraser, Pahang of Malay Peninsula is described: Gryllotalpa fraser sp. n. Photographs of Gryllotalpa hirsuta Burmeister, 1838 were examined and some remarks are made here, including a comparison with Gryllotalpa fraser sp. n. and Gryllotalpa nymphicus Tan, 2012. Copyright © 2013 Magnolia Press. Source


Mahoney S.P.,ET Water Inc | Krausman P.,University of Montana | Weir J.N.,Institute for Biodiversity
International Journal of Environmental Studies | Year: 2015

Conservation will only increase as a focus for governments in the 21st century. Canada and the United States have been successful in conserving wildlife and habitats over the past 100 years through the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation. This approach is not universally accepted, however, and there are challenges to sustainable use practices such as hunting and fishing. Herein, we discuss seven of the biggest challenges to conservation worldwide: an increasing human population; globalization; urbanization and the human-nature divide; novel ecosystems; connectivity; funding, fragility and resilience; and abundance and superabundance. We then relate these to the North American context. © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Source


Home > Press > Nanofur for oil spill cleanup: Materials researchers learn from aquatic ferns: Hairy plant leaves are highly oil-absorbing / publication in bioinspiration & biomimetics / video on absorption capacity Abstract: Some water ferns can absorb large volumes of oil within a short time, because their leaves are strongly water-repellent and, at the same time, highly oil-absorbing. Researchers of KIT, together with colleagues of Bonn University, have found that the oil-binding capacity of the water plant results from the hairy microstructure of its leaves. It is now used as a model to further develop the new Nanofur material for the environmentally friendly cleanup of oil spills. (DOI: 10.1088/1748-3190/11/5/056003) Damaged pipelines, oil tanker disasters, and accidents on oil drilling and production platforms may result in pollutions of water with crude or mineral oil. Conventional methods to clean up the oil spill are associated with specific drawbacks. Oil combustion or the use of chemical substances to accelerate oil decomposition cause secondary environmental pollution. Many natural materials to take up the oil, such as sawdust or plant fibers, are hardly effective, because they also absorb large amounts of water. On their search for an environmentally friendly alternative to clean up oil spills, the researchers compared various species of aquatic ferns. "We already knew that the leaves of these plants repel water, but for the first time now, we have studied their capacity to absorb oil," Claudia Zeiger says. She conducted the project at KIT's Institute of Microstructure Technology. Aquatic ferns originally growing in tropical and subtropical regions can now also be found in parts of Europe. As they reproduce strongly, they are often considered weed. However, they have a considerable potential as low-cost, rapid, and environmentally friendly oil absorbers, which is obvious from a short video at http://www.kit.edu/kit/english/pi_2016_115_nanofur-for-oil-spill-cleanup.php. "The plants might be used in lakes to absorb accidental oil spills," Zeiger says. After less than 30 seconds, the leaves reach maximum absorption and can be skimmed off together with the absorbed oil. The water plant named salvinia has trichomes on the leaf surface -- hairy extensions of 0.3 to 2.5 mm in length. Comparison of different salvinia species revealed that leaves with the longest hairs did not absorb the largest amounts of oil. "Oil-absorbing capacity is determined by the shape of the hair ends," Zeiger emphasizes. The largest quantity of oil was absorbed by leaves of the water fern salvinia molesta, whose hair ends are shaped like an eggbeater. Based on this new knowledge on the relationship between surface structure of leaves and their oil-absorbing capacity, the researchers improved the 'Nanofur' material developed at their institute. This plastic nanofur mimics the water-repellent and oil-absorbing effect of salvinia to separate oil and water. "We study nanostructures and microstructures in nature for potential technical developments," says Hendrik Hölscher, Head of the Biomimetic Surfaces Group of the Institute of Microstructure Technology of KIT. He points out that different properties of plants made of the same material frequently result from differences of their finest structures. ### Claudia Zeiger as the first author presents the study results in the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics under the heading of "Microstructures of superhydrophobic plant leaves -- inspiration for efficient oil spill cleanup materials." This study was carried out in cooperation with scientists of the Nees Institute for Biodiversity of Plants of Bonn University, which was established by bionics pioneer Wilhelm Barthlott. Research was supported by a Ph.D. grant of Carl Zeiss Foundation, the Brazilian research and exchange program Ciências sem Fronteiras, and the Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) high-tech platform of KIT. About Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) pools its three core tasks of research, higher education, and innovation in a mission. With about 9,300 employees and 25,000 students, KIT is one of the big institutions of research and higher education in natural sciences and engineering in Europe. KIT - The Research University in the Helmholtz Association Since 2010, the KIT has been certified as a family-friendly university. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | August 23, 2016
Site: http://www.cemag.us/rss-feeds/all/rss.xml/all

Some water ferns can absorb large volumes of oil within a short time, because their leaves are strongly water-repellent and, at the same time, highly oil-absorbing. Researchers of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), together with colleagues of Bonn University, have found that the oil-binding capacity of the water plant results from the hairy microstructure of its leaves. It is now used as a model to further develop the new Nanofur material for the environmentally friendly cleanup of oil spills. Damaged pipelines, oil tanker disasters, and accidents on oil drilling and production platforms may result in pollutions of water with crude or mineral oil. Conventional methods to clean up the oil spill are associated with specific drawbacks. Oil combustion or the use of chemical substances to accelerate oil decomposition cause secondary environmental pollution. Many natural materials to take up the oil, such as sawdust or plant fibers, are hardly effective, because they also absorb large amounts of water. On their search for an environmentally friendly alternative to clean up oil spills, the researchers compared various species of aquatic ferns. “We already knew that the leaves of these plants repel water, but for the first time now, we have studied their capacity to absorb oil,” Claudia Zeiger says. She conducted the project at KIT’s Institute of Microstructure Technology. Aquatic ferns originally growing in tropical and subtropical regions can now also be found in parts of Europe. As they reproduce strongly, they are often considered weed. However, they have a considerable potential as low-cost, rapid, and environmentally friendly oil absorbers. “The plants might be used in lakes to absorb accidental oil spills,” Zeiger says. After less than 30 seconds, the leaves reach maximum absorption and can be skimmed off together with the absorbed oil. The water plant named salvinia has trichomes on the leaf surface — hairy extensions of 0.3 to 2.5 mm in length. Comparison of different salvinia species revealed that leaves with the longest hairs did not absorb the largest amounts of oil. “Oil-absorbing capacity is determined by the shape of the hair ends,” Zeiger emphasizes. The largest quantity of oil was absorbed by leaves of the water fern salvinia molesta, whose hair ends are shaped like an eggbeater. Based on this new knowledge on the relationship between surface structure of leaves and their oil-absorbing capacity, the researchers improved the “Nanofur” material developed at their institute. This plastic nanofur mimics the water-repellent and oil-absorbing effect of salvinia to separate oil and water. “We study nanostructures and microstructures in nature for potential technical developments,” says Hendrik Hölscher, Head of the Biomimetic Surfaces Group of the Institute of Microstructure Technology of KIT. He points out that different properties of plants made of the same material frequently result from differences of their finest structures. Claudia Zeiger, as the first author, presents the study results in the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics under the heading of “Microstructures of superhydrophobic plant leaves — inspiration for efficient oil spill cleanup materials.” This study was carried out in cooperation with scientists of the Nees Institute for Biodiversity of Plants of Bonn University, which was established by bionics pioneer Wilhelm Barthlott. Research was supported by a Ph.D. grant of Carl Zeiss Foundation, the Brazilian research and exchange program Ciências sem Fronteiras, and the Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) high-tech platform of KIT.

Discover hidden collaborations