Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany

Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany


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Mikolajek M.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany | Friederich A.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany | Kohler C.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany | Rosen M.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany | And 3 more authors.
Advanced Engineering Materials | Year: 2015

This article describes the preparation of composite thick films via inkjet printing in one process step. A novel ceramic/polymer ink is developed, suitable for the fabrication of homogeneous dielectric composite thick films. Therefore, a barium strontium titanate (BST) dispersion is prepared and combined with a highly loaded polymer solution afterwards. Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 is synthesized by a sol-gel method and dispersed in butyl diglycol using a stirred media mill. A poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) solution is prepared in butanone and mixed with the BST dispersion to obtain an ink with a 50:50 volume ratio of BST and PMMA. The ink characteristics and printability are investigated, in particular the drying behavior of the ink at different temperatures and the morphology of the composite thick films. The drying behavior of low viscosity particle suspensions is often influenced by the coffee stain effect. However, for the developed composite ink no coffee stain effect is observed and homogeneous composite thick films are achieved. Afterwards, all-inkjet-printed capacitors are fabricated, using the developed composite ink. Finally, the relative permittivity εr and loss tangent tan δ of the composite thick films are determined. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Bauer J.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany | Schroer A.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany | Schwaiger R.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany | Kraft O.,Institute for Applied MaterialsKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyHermann von Helmholtz Platz 176344Eggenstein LeopoldshafenGermany
Advanced Engineering Materials | Year: 2016

Lattice materials are strong yet light. Miniaturizing the pattern size to the micro-scale allows exploiting mechanical size effects. So far, the impact of the lattice size on the strength has not been studied systematically and mechanical characterization has been focused on compression tests only. Here, the strength of polymer-alumina core-shell composite microlattices with different pattern sizes is investigated in compression and tension. The compressive strength increases by a factor of two when the lattice size is scaled down by 50%. With tensile strengths of up to 27MPa at 0.37gcm-3, the microlattices outperform all technical foams and most monolithic ceramics. Isotropic strength under tension and compression is found when thickness-dependent notch effects in the alumina shells are considered. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

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