Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences

www.iasbs.ac.ir/
Zanjan, Iran

The Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic science is an advanced research center and graduate-level degree-granting institution in Zanjan, Iran. It was founded in 1991 by Prof. Yousef Sobouti, who was the director of the institute until 2010. After that Dr.Rasoul Khodabakhsh was the director till February 2014, and Dr. HamidReza Mohammadi Khalesifard has filled the position since then.IASBS is considered to be one of the most productive research centers of the country. It offers advanced degrees in Mathematics, Physics, Geophysics, Biophysics and Chemistry. As of 2008, the mathematics department offers master of science degrees in Computer Science with concentration on Artificial Intelligence and Graph & Algorithms. The university also runs two undergraduate programs in Information Technology, one of which is a joint program with Heriot-Watt University of the United Kingdom. The latter, lectured and examined in English language, involves passing modules in both universities at the same time and each student is officially registered both at IASBS and Heriot-Watt University . The unique collaboration of the two universities has resulted in an advanced Information Technology program and many of its alumni have joined highly ranked institutions in United Kingdom, Canada and United States.The library of the university began its work in 1993 as a relatively small part in physics department. It was then substantially expanded by moving to a brand new building about 16 years later. The new library was opened in 2007 and named Torkaman Library after its donor. Currently, the library keeps 20,208 books, 6,552 of which are in Persian, and the other 13,659 are in English and other languages.In May 2002, Zanjan ICT incubator established by Dr. Jalil Khavandkar in the IASBS for development of technology and business. He followed this by establishing Zanjan Science and Technology Park in June 2009. These two foundations are of the most successful techno-centers in Iran. Wikipedia.

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News Article | June 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The European Physical Journal E - Soft Matter and Biological Physics (EPJE) has awarded Iranian physicist Ramin Golestanian the 2017 EPJE Pierre-Gilles de Gennes Lecture Prize. Golestanian was selected for his outstanding theoretical contributions to the physics of microswimmers and their hydrodynamic interactions which have led to a series of exciting new discoveries and stimulated the development of the field of active matter. This is the sixth time this prestigious prize, named after the Nobel laureate who founded EPJE, has been awarded. The EPJE Pierre-Gilles de Gennes lecture will be delivered by Golestanian during the 10th Liquid Matter Conference in Ljubljana, Slovenia, which takes place from 17-21 July 2017. Ramin Golestanian completed his PhD at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS) in Zanjan, Iran, under the remote supervision of Mehran Kardar from MIT. He followed with an independent postdoctoral research fellowship at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Before joining the University of Oxford in 2010 as professor of theoretical condensed matter physics, he held academic positions at IASBS and the University of Sheffield. His broad research interests include nonequilibrium statistical physics, soft matter, and biological physics. Golestanian is renowned for his work on active matter and, in particular, for his role in developing microscopic swimmers and active colloids. He is recipient of the Holweck Medal of the Société Française de Physique and the Institute of Physics, and is the author of over 130 articles in peer reviewed journals. He recently edited a special issue on active matter in EPJE together with physicist Sriram Ramaswamy. The EPJE Pierre-Gilles de Gennes Lecture Prize is sponsored by the European Physical Journal (EPJ) co-publishers, which consist of the Italian Physical Society (SIF) and the publishers EDP Sciences and Springer. It is awarded to outstanding scientists for their contribution to soft matter research. The European Physical Journal E publishes papers describing advances in the understanding of physical aspects of soft matter and biological systems. This includes reports of experimental, computational and theoretical studies and appeals to the broad interdisciplinary communities including physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. The European Physical Journals are international peer-reviewed publications covering the whole spectrium of pure and applied physics, including related interdisciplinary subjects. They are a continuation of Acta Physica Hungarica, Anales de Fisica, Czechoslovak Journal of Physics, Fizika A, Il Nuovo Cimento, Journal de Physique, Portugaliae Physica and Zeitschrift für Physik. The EPJE Pierre-Gilles de Gennes Lecture will be given on Thursday 20 July at 9:00am (CET) during the 10th Liquid Matter Conference in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Springer is a leading global scientific, technical and medical portfolio, providing researchers in academia, scientific institutions and corporate R&D departments with quality content through innovative information, products and services. Springer has one of the strongest STM and HSS eBook collections and archives, as well as a comprehensive range of hybrid and open access journals. Springer is part of Springer Nature, a global publisher that serves and supports the research community. Springer Nature aims to advance discovery by publishing robust and insightful science, supporting the development of new areas of research and making ideas and knowledge accessible around the world. As part of Springer Nature, Springer sits alongside other trusted brands like Nature Research, BioMed Central and Palgrave Macmillan. Visit http://www. and follow @SpringerNature


Najafpour M.M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
Chemical Communications | Year: 2011

For the first time, a self-assembled layered hybrid [Ru(bpy) 3] 2+/manganese(iii,iv) as a water oxidizing system is reported. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Najafpour M.M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
Dalton Transactions | Year: 2011

A soluble form of colloidal manganese(iv) oxide showed efficient oxygen evolution or water oxidation in presence of oxone, H2O2, cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate and tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)ruthenium(iii). © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Najafpour M.M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
Dalton Transactions | Year: 2011

Incorporation of calcium to mixed-valence manganese oxides improved the water oxidation activity of these manganese oxides © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Najafpour M.M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology | Year: 2011

The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Karimi B.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences | Vafaeezadeh M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
Chemical Communications | Year: 2012

Incorporating a hydrophobic Brønsted acid ionic liquid (HBAIL) inside the nanospaces of SBA-15-Pr-SO 3H led to a hydrophobic super Brønsted acid catalyst, which showed excellent catalytic performance in direct esterification of alcohols and carboxylic acids at ambient temperature under solvent-free conditions. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.


Gholinejad M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
European Journal of Organic Chemistry | Year: 2013

In this study, a protocol for the synthesis of symmetrical diaryl trithiocarbonates through the one-pot copper-catalyzed coupling reaction of sodium sulfide, carbon disulfide, and aryl compounds in DMF solution is presented. This method allows the synthesis of symmetrical diaryl trithiocarbonates without the use of highly toxic thiophosgene, and also, commercially available aryl halides were used instead of less available, toxic thiols. © 2013 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Gholinejad M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
Applied Organometallic Chemistry | Year: 2013

In this article, palladium nanoparticles supported on agarose were used as an efficient catalyst for Heck-Matsuda and Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions of structurally different aryldiazonium tetrafluoroborate substrates in aqueous media. Heck-Matsuda reactions proceeded at 40°C whereas Suzuki-Miyaura reactions were carried out at room temperature. Both reactions required low catalyst loading. The catalyst was also recycled for the model reaction for three runs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Najafpour M.M.,Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences
Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres | Year: 2011

In this paper a few calcium-manganese oxides and calcium-manganese minerals are studied as catalysts for water oxidation. The natural mineral marokite is also studied as a catalyst for water oxidation for the first time. Marokite is made up of edge-sharing Mn3+ in a distorted octahedral environment and eight-coordinate Ca2+ centered polyhedral layers. The structure is similar to recent models of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II. Thus, the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II does not have an unusual structure and could be synthesized hydrothermally. Also in this paper, oxygen evolution is studied with marokite (CaMn2O4), pyrolusite (MnO2) and compared with hollandite (Ba0.2Ca0.15K0.3Mn6.9Al0.2Si0.3O16), hausmannite (Mn3O4), Mn2O3. H2O, CaMn3O6. H2O, CaMn4O8. H2O, CaMn2O4. H2O and synthetic marokite (CaMn2O4). I propose that the origin of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II resulted from absorption of calcium and manganese ions that were precipitated together in the archean oceans by protocyanobacteria because of changing pH from ~5 to ~8-10. As reported in this paper, amorphous calcium-manganese oxides with different ratios of manganese and calcium are effective catalysts for water oxidation. The bond types and lengths of the calcium and manganese ions in the calcium-manganese oxides are directly comparable to those in the OEC. This primitive structure of these amorphous calcium-manganese compounds could be changed and modified by environmental groups (amino acids) to form the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Oxygen evolution was observed upon mixing either hollandite, which has been proposed as a structural model for the biological water oxidizing complex, or hausmannite with an aqueous solution of cerium (IV) ammonium nitrate. Oxygen evolution from water during irradiationwith visible light (λ>400 nm) was also observed upon adding either hollandite or hausmannite to an aqueous solution containing tris (2,2′-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride and chloro pentaammine cobalt(III) chloride in acetate buffer. These experiments showed that hollandite is a good catalyst for oxygen evolution in presence of cerium (IV) ammonium nitrate or tris (2,2′- bipyridyl)ruthenium (III). Thus, hollandite is not only a structural but also a functional model for the biological water oxidizing complex. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Geomicrobiology Journal to view the free supplemental file. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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