Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM

Arraial do Cabo, Brazil

Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM

Arraial do Cabo, Brazil
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Calazans S.H.,Federal University of Fluminense | Calazans S.H.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Walters L.J.,University of Central Florida | Fernandes F.C.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2017

In 2004, Mytella charruana (d’Orbigny, 1842) (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Mytilidae) became established along the coast of the southeastern United States (SE-US). Using mitochondrial DNA sequencing (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I), we compared genetic variation throughout its native range in South America to its invasive range in the SE-US. Samples from the SE-US were collected in 2006 and 2010 enabling a temporal comparison to evaluate possible genetic changes of the invasive population. We addressed two questions. First, what are the potential source populations (or geographic regions) for the SE-US invasion? Second, how has genetic diversity changed between the two sampling periods within the SE-US? We identified a total of 72 haplotypes, 64 of which were isolated to geographic sites and only 8 were shared among sites. The highly structured native range provides insight into the origin of invasive populations where our results suggest that the introduced SE-US population originated from multiple source populations with the Panama region as the primary source. Additionally, our results indicate that genetic composition of the non-native populations was unchanged between the two sampling periods. Mytella charruana exhibit a significant pattern of genetic structure among natural populations, owing to biogeographic barriers that limit natural dispersal, and an ability to persist in novel habitats, owing to a suite of life-history characters that favor survival under variable conditions. Overall, this study explains why M. charruana may become an increasing threat to locations founded by anthropogenic transportation. © 2017 Calazans C et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Brutemark A.,Linnaeus University | Carvalho W.F.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Graneli E.,Linnaeus University
Journal of the American Water Resources Association | Year: 2010

Harmful algal bloom species can persist in the environment, impacting aquatic life and human health. One of the mechanisms by which some harmful algal bloom species are able to persist is by consumption of organic particles. Methods to demonstrate and measure consumption can yield insight into how populations thrive. Here, we combine flow cytometry and real-time PCR to demonstrate consumption of a cryptophyte species (Rhodomonas sp. .) by a toxic mixotrophic haptophyte (Prymnesium parvum). Using flow cytometry, the feeding frequency of a population of P. parvum cells was calculated using the phycoerythrin (PE) fluorescence signal from Rhodomonas sp. and the fluorescence of an acidotropic probe labeling the food vacuoles. Feeding frequency increased in the beginning of the experiment and then began to decline, reaching a maximum of 47.5% of the whole P. parvum population after 212 min. The maximum number of consumed Rhodomonas sp. cells was 0.8 per P. parvum cell, and occurred after 114 min corresponding to an ingestion rate of 0.4 Rhodomonas sp. cells/. P. parvum/h. Cells from the feeding P. parvum population were sorted, washed, and subjected to a real-time PCR assay targeting the cryptophyte 18S locus. There was a correlation between cycle threshold (Ct) values and number of consumed prey cells calculated by fluorescence. Overall, this study shows that flow cytometric analysis, of the acidotropic probe and prey pigments, is an efficient and rapid tool in enumerating food vacuoles and the number of prey cells consumed. Furthermore, we suggest that real-time PCR can be applied to cells sorted by flow cytometry, thus allowing for the detection and potential quantification of the targeted prey cells. © 2010 American Water Resources Association.


Bahia J.,SNSB Zoologische Staatssammlung Munich | Bahia J.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Padula V.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Schrodl M.,SNSB Zoologische Staatssammlung Munich | Schrodl M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich
Organisms Diversity and Evolution | Year: 2017

Polyclad flatworms have a troubled classification history, with two contradicting systems in use. They both rely on a ventral adhesive structure to define the suborders Acotylea and Cotylea, but superfamilies were defined according to eyespot arrangement (Prudhoe’s system) or prostatic vesicle characters (Faubel’s system). Molecular data available cover a very limited part of the known polyclad family diversity and have not allowed testing morphology-based classification systems on Polycladida yet. We thus sampled a suitable marker, partial 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), from Polycladida (19 families and 32 genera), generating 136 new sequences and the first comprehensive genetic dataset on polyclads. Our maximum likelihood (ML) analyses recovered Polycladida, but the traditional suborders were not monophyletic, as the supposedly acotyleans Cestoplana and Theama were nested within Cotylea; we suggest that these genera should be included in Cotylea. The partial 28S rDNA trees were generally well supported and robust but in conflict with both Faubel’s and Prudhoe’s superfamilies. Therefore, we compiled morphological and anatomical characters for all taxa used and examined their distribution on our molecular tree. Combining morphological and molecular evidence, we redefined polyclad superfamilies. Acotylea contain tentaculated and atentaculated groups and is now divided in three superfamilies. The suborder Cotylea can be divided in five superfamilies. In general, there is a trait of anteriorization of sensory structures, from the plesiomorphic acotylean body plan to the cotylean gross morphology. Traditionally used characters, such as prostatic vesicle, eyespot distribution, and type of pharynx, are all homoplastic and likely have misled polyclad systematics so far. © 2017 Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik


Massone C.G.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | Massone C.G.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Wagener A.L.R.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | Abreu H.M.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | Gioda A.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2015

Polycyclic aromatic (46 PAHs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons (C12−C40) were studied in atmospheric particulate matter sampled in Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area (RJMA). In total, 236 samples from six different sites were collected simultaneously and weekly over 1 year (January–December 2011) allowing a robust atmospheric characterization of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Hydrocarbon concentration was in general low compared to previous studies in the area (PAHs range 0.25–19.3 ng m−3), possibly due to changes in fuel composition over time. Precipitation is the main meteorological parameter that rules particulate and hydrocarbon concentration, modifying PAH typology by scavenging. Aliphatic and aromatic diagnostic ratios gave indications conflicting with combustion features. However, ratios showed differences among sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) associated to multiple linear regressions (MLR) allowed quantitative estimate of sources and effectively indicated vehicular emission as the main hydrocarbon source in the atmospheric particulate matter. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Candella R.N.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Souza S.M.L.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia | Year: 2013

Wind waves with significant height of more than 6 m were generated by the winds associated to a cyclone off the Brazilian coast in May 2011. The cyclone, which can be classified as subtropical due to its characteristics of hybrid system and the strong contrast between the ocean temperature and air temperature at 500 hPa, had completely abnormal trajectory, moving towards the north/northwest, in a stage of its development. Data from oceanographic buoys, numerical modeling results and satellite images were used to characterize the event. Although this cyclone had not touched the continent and there were no reports of human or material losses, this type of development is similar to Hurricane Catarina, occurred in March 2004, especially its trajectory opposites to the mean atmospheric flow.


Fujita D.S.,State University of Maringá | Fujita D.S.,Instituto Federal Of Educacao | Takeda A.M.,State University of Maringá | Coutinho R.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Fernandes F.C.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM
Brazilian Journal of Biology | Year: 2015

We conducted a study about invertebrates on artificial substrates with different antifouling paints in order to answer the following questions: 1) is there lower accumulation of organic matter on substrates with antifouling paints, 2) is invertebrate colonization influenced by the release of biocides from antifouling paints, 3) is the colonization of aquatic invertebrates positively influenced by the material accumulated upon the substrate surface and 4) is the assemblage composition of invertebrates similar among the different antifouling paints? To answer these questions, four structures were installed in the Baía River in February 1st, 2007. Each structure was composed of 7 wood boards: 5 boards painted with each type of antifouling paints (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5), one painted only with the primer (Pr) and the other without any paint (Cn). After 365 days, we observed a greater accumulation of organic matter in the substrates with T2 and T3 paint coatings. Limnoperna fortunei was recorded in all tested paints, with higher densities in the control, primer, T2 and T3. The colonization of Chironomidae and Naididae on the substrate was positively influenced by L. fortunei density. The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) of the invertebrate community provided evidence of the clear distinction of invertebrate assemblages among the paints. Paints T2 and T3 were the most similar to the control and primer. Our results suggest that antifouling paints applied on substrates hinder invertebrate colonization by decreasing the density and richness of invertebrates. © 2015, Instituto Internacional de Ecologia. All rights reserved.


Zamprogno G.C.,Federal University of Espirito Santo | Fernandes F.C.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Fernandes L.L.,Federal University of Espirito Santo
Iheringia - Serie Zoologia | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT. The relationships between environmental factors and temporal and spatial variations of benthic communities of three rocky shores of the state of Espírito Santo, Southeast Brazil, were studied. Sampling was conducted every three months, from August 2006 to May 2007, using intersection points. Chthamalus bisinuatus (Pilsbry, 1916) (Crustacea) and Brachidontes spp. (Mollusca) were the most abundant taxa, occupying the upper level of the intertidal zone of the rocky shore. The species richness was higher at the lower levels. The invasive species Isognomon bicolor (C. B. Adams, 1845) (Mollusca) occurred at low densities in the studied areas. The clustering analysis dendrogram indicated a separation of communities based on exposed and sheltered areas. According to the variance analyses, the communities were significantly different among the studied areas and seasons. The extent of wave exposure and shore slope influenced the species variability. The Setibão site showed the highest diversity and richness, most likely due to greater wave exposure. The communities showed greater variation in the lower levels where environmental conditions were less severe, relative to the other levels.


Massone C.G.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | Massone C.G.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM | Wagener A.L.R.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | Abreu H.M.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro | Gioda A.,Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2015

Polycyclic aromatic (46 PAHs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons (C12−C40) were studied in atmospheric particulate matter sampled in Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area (RJMA). In total, 236 samples from six different sites were collected simultaneously and weekly over 1 year (January–December 2011) allowing a robust atmospheric characterization of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Hydrocarbon concentration was in general low compared to previous studies in the area (PAHs range 0.25–19.3 ng m−3), possibly due to changes in fuel composition over time. Precipitation is the main meteorological parameter that rules particulate and hydrocarbon concentration, modifying PAH typology by scavenging. Aliphatic and aromatic diagnostic ratios gave indications conflicting with combustion features. However, ratios showed differences among sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) associated to multiple linear regressions (MLR) allowed quantitative estimate of sources and effectively indicated vehicular emission as the main hydrocarbon source in the atmospheric particulate matter. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


Zamprogno G.C.,Federal University of Espirito Santo | Fernandes L.L.,Federal University of Espirito Santo | Fernandes F.C.,Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM
Brazilian Journal of Oceanography | Year: 2010

This study aimed to compare the density of Isognomon bicolor on four rocky shores of the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Further, size and weight comparisons were undertaken for the flat and creviced surfaces. Quarterly samplings were taken in 2006 and 2007, by removing organisms from 10 × 10 cm quadrants in the mid-intertidal zone, with five samples from flat surfaces and five from crevices. Although densities of I. bicolor were considered low as compared with those of other studies, this species is well established in the State. The most well-established population of I. bicolor was found in the rock crevices. The most important factor for the establishment of I. bicolor on rocky shores is substrate heterogeneity.


PubMed | Institute Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira IEAPM and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Although previous studies have described opposing states in upwelling regions, i.e., the rise of cold nutrient-rich waters and prevalence of surface warm nutrient-poor waters, few have addressed the transition from one state to the other. This study aimed to describe the microbial and viral structure during this transition and was able to obtain the taxonomic and metabolic compositions as well as physical-chemical data. This integrated approach allowed for a better understanding of the dynamics of the downwelling upwelling transition, suggesting that a wealth of metabolic processes and ecological interactions are occurring in the minute fractions of the plankton (femto, pico, nano). These processes and interactions included evidence of microbial predominance during downwelling (with nitrogen recycling and aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis), different viral predation pressures over primary production in different states (cyanobacteria vs eukaryotes), and a predominance of diatoms and selected bacterial and archaeal groups during upwelling (with the occurrence of a wealth of nitrogen metabolism involving ammonia). Thus, the results provided insights into which microbes, viruses and microbial-mediated processes are probably important in the functioning of upwelling systems.

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