Institute Dinvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili Iispv

Tarragona, Spain

Institute Dinvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili Iispv

Tarragona, Spain
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Lopez I.H.,University Hospital of Sant Joan | Parada D.,University Hospital of Sant Joan | Gallardo P.,University Hospital of Sant Joan | Gascon M.,University Hospital of Sant Joan | And 7 more authors.
Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy | Year: 2017

Objectives Ki-67 is a proliferation marker in prostate cancer. A prognostic RNA signature was developed to characterize prostate cancer aggressiveness. The aim was to evaluate prognostic correlation of CCP and Ki-67 with biochemical failure (BF), and survival in high-risk prostate cancer patients (pts) treated with radiation therapy (RT). Methods CCP score and Ki-67 were derived retrospectively from pre-treatment paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue of 33 men diagnosed from 2002 to 2006. CCP score was calculated as an average expression of 31 CCP genes. Ki-67 was determined by IHC. Single pathologist evaluated all tissues. Factors associated to failure and survival were analyzed. Results Median CCP score was 0.9 (-0-1 – 2.6). CCP 0: 1 pt; CCP 1: 19 pts; CCP 2: 13 pts. Median Ki-67 was 8.9. Ki-67 cutpoint was 15.08%. BF and DSM were observed in 21% and 9%. Ki-67 ≥ 15% predicted BF (p = 0.043). With a median follow-up of 8.4 years, 10-year BF, OS, DM and DSM for CCP 1 vs. CCP 2 was 76–71% (p = 0.83), 83–73% (p = 0.86), 89–85% (p = 0.84), and 94–78% (p = 0.66). On univariate, high Ki-67 was correlated with BF (p = 0.013), OS (p = 0.023), DM (p = 0.007), and DSM (p = 0.01). On Cox MVA, high Ki-67 had a BF trend (p = 0.063). High CCP score was not correlated with DSM. Conclusions High Ki-67 significantly predicted outcome and provided prognostic information. CCP score may improve accuracy stratification. We did not provide prognostic correlation of CCP and DSM. It should be validated in a larger cohort of pts. © 2017 Greater Poland Cancer Centre


Abril-Ulloa V.,Rovira i Virgili University | Abril-Ulloa V.,University of Cuenca | Flores-Mateo G.,Institute Universitari dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol | Flores-Mateo G.,CIBER ISCIII | And 6 more authors.
BMC Public Health | Year: 2014

Background: Elevated ferritin levels have been associated with single cardiovascular risk factors but the relationship to the presence of metabolic syndrome is inconclusive.The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis of published observational studies was to estimate the association between serum ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome in adults. Methods. The Pubmed, SCOPUS and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for epidemiological studies that assessed the association between ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome and were published before September 2013. There were no language restrictions. Two investigators independently selected eligible studies. Measures of association were pooled by using an inverse-variance weighted random-effects model. The heterogeneity among studies was examined using the I 2 index. Publication bias was evaluated using the funnel plot. Results: Twelve cross-sectional, one case-control and two prospective studies met our inclusion criteria including data from a total of 56,053 participants. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the metabolic syndrome comparing the highest and lowest category of ferritin levels was 1.73 (95% CI: 1.54, 1.95; I2 = 75,4%). Subgroup analyses indicate that pooled OR was 1.92 (95% CI: 1.61, 2.30; I 2 = 78%) for studies adjusting for C-reactive protein (CRP), and 1.52 (95% CI:1. 36, 1.69; I2 = 41%) for studies that did not adjust for CRP (P = 0.044). This finding was remarkably robust in the sensitivity analysis. We did not find publication bias. Conclusions: The meta-analysis suggests that increased ferritin levels are independently and positively associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome with an odds ratio higher than 1.73. © 2014Abril-Ulloa et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Moreno-Navarrete J.M.,Hospital of Girona Dr Josep Trueta | Moreno-Navarrete J.M.,Institute Dinvestigacio Biomedica Of Girona Idibgi | Moreno-Navarrete J.M.,CIBER ISCIII | Escote X.,Rovira i Virgili University | And 19 more authors.
Diabetologia | Year: 2015

Aims/hypothesis: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein (LBP) is a novel 65 kDa adipokine, linked to adipose tissue (AT) inflammation, obesity and insulin resistance, that inhibits adipocyte differentiation. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms behind these detrimental effects on adipogenesis through whole-genome transcriptomics and in vitro experiments. Methods: Permanent and transient knockdown (KD) and co-culture experiments were performed in 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A cell lines during adipocyte differentiation. Microarray gene expression was performed using Genechip Affymetrix technology and validated by real-time PCR. Results: LBP KD of 3T3-L1 cells led to a potentiated adipocyte differentiation with a dose–response relationship; genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, fatty acid metabolism and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) action were dramatically upregulated in parallel to increased insulin signalling. Cells with LBP KD became refractory to proinflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory stimuli (LPS and palmitate). This phenotype, mediated through disrupted nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signalling, was reversed by a soluble factor present in a co-culture with native cells and by exogenous LBP. Double-silencing of LBP and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) again rendered these cells insensitive to co-culture, LBP and inflammatory factors. Conclusions/interpretation: In summary, LBP is a proinflammatory soluble adipokine that acts as a brake for adipogenesis, strengthening the negative effects of palmitate and LPS on adipocyte differentiation. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Perez-Moreno M.O.,Hospital Of Tortosa Verge Of La Cinta | Perez-Moreno M.O.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Pico-Plana E.,Hospital Of Tortosa Verge Of La Cinta | Pico-Plana E.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | And 12 more authors.
International Journal of Medical Microbiology | Year: 2013

This work investigates the occurrence and features of class 1 integrons and the presence of transferable quinolone resistance determinants (TQRD) among 382 clinical Salmonella enterica isolates of non-Typhimurium serotypes as well as the β-lactamases produced by amoxicillin-resistant isolates. These isolates were recovered in 2001 and from 2004 to 2009 from patients from the health region of Terres de l'Ebre (Catalonia, Spain) and comprised 41 different serotypes, mostly of serovar Enteritidis (. n=. 272), being 16.5% multidrug-resistant (MDR). Among the 93 amoxicillin-resistant isolates, 84 produced TEM-1,4 produced an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (CTX-M-9 in one S. Grumpensis and in one S. Virchow, CTX-M-15 in S. Kapemba, and SHV-12 in S. Enteritidis), one produced DHA-1 (. S. Newport), and 4 did not present any of the investigated β-lactamases. TQRD were found in 2 isolates (. qnrA1 in CTX-M-9-producing S. Grumpensis and qnrB4 in DHA-1-producing S. Newport). Overall, 35 isolates (9.2% of all isolates and 54% of MDR isolates) belonging to 15 different serotypes carried class 1 integrons that were transferred by conjugation in 17 isolates. Eleven distinct cassette arrangements were identified, with dfrA1-aadA1, dfrA17-aadA5, and dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 being the most prevalent and widely distributed ones. Atypical sul3-associated integrons were detected in 5 isolates of serotypes Rissen and Enteritidis. Moreover, the presence of integrons in the serotypes Kapemba, Mikawasima, and [9,12:Iv:i:-], of the estX-psp (linked to sul3) and aadA13-sat cassette arrangements in S. enterica, of extended-spectrum β-lactamases in S. Kapemba and S. Grumpensis, and of TQRD in S. Grumpensis is reported here for the first time. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH.


Brugnara L.,Hospital Clinic Of Barcelona | Brugnara L.,Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders | Vinaixa M.,Rovira i Virgili University | Vinaixa M.,Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders | And 16 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

The beneficial effects of exercise in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are not fully proven, given that it may occasionally induce acute metabolic disturbances. Indeed, the metabolic disturbances associated with sustained exercise may lead to worsening control unless great care is taken to adjust carbohydrate intake and insulin dosage. In this work, pre- and post-exercise metabolites were analyzed using a 1H-NMR and GC-MS untargeted metabolomics approach assayed in serum. We studied ten men with T1D and eleven controls matched for age, body mass index, body fat composition, and cardiorespiratory capacity, participated in the study. The participants performed 30 minutes of exercise on a cycle-ergometer at 80% VO2max. In response to exercise, both groups had increased concentrations of gluconeogenic precursors (alanine and lactate) and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates (citrate, malate, fumarate and succinate). The T1D group, however, showed attenuation in the response of these metabolites to exercise. Conversely to T1D, the control group also presented increases in α-ketoglutarate, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid, and lipolysis products (glycerol and oleic and linoleic acids), as well as a reduction in branched chain amino acids (valine and leucine) determinations. The T1D patients presented a blunted metabolic response to acute exercise as compared to controls. This attenuated response may interfere in the healthy performance or fitness of T1D patients, something that further studies should elucidate. © 2012 Brugnara et al.


Arija V.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Arija V.,Institute dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria | Ribot B.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Aranda N.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV
Public Health Nutrition | Year: 2013

Objective To describe the prevalence of iron depletion (ID), iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) and risk of haemoconcentration during pregnancy and at delivery and to assess the influence of initial Fe stores and Fe supplementation on that prevalence. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Hospital Universitari Sant Joan de Reus (Catalonia, Spain). Subjects Two hundred and eighty-five pregnant women. Serum ferritin and Hb were measured in the first, second and third trimesters and at delivery. Women were classified according to initial Fe stores as ID or no ID (serum ferritin ≥12 μg/l) and according to Fe supplement use as supplemented or non-supplemented. Results Initial ID was 16·2 %. At delivery, 45·7 % had ID, 13·5 % IDA and 13·3 % had risk of haemoconcentration. Initial ID and non-supplemented groups had significantly higher prevalences of ID and IDA and lower risk of haemoconcentration at delivery than the other groups. In the multiple logistic models, no initial ID and Fe supplementation exerted a protective effect against ID at delivery (adjusted OR = 0·28; 95 % CI 0·13, 0·58 and adjusted OR = 0·39; 95 % CI 0·22, 0·69, respectively). Moderate Fe supplementation did not seem to clearly prevent IDA (adjusted OR = 0·91; 95 % CI 0·42, 1·96) or to enhance the haemoconcentration (adjusted OR = 1·42; 95 % CI 0·58, 3·50). Conclusions The prevalence of ID and IDA was high in late pregnancy in healthy pregnant women, particularly in those with initial ID and/or those not taking supplements. Starting pregnancy with no ID and/or taking moderate Fe supplementation decreased the likelihood of ID at delivery. The risk of haemoconcentration was high at delivery, but did not seem to be promoted by Fe supplementation. Further research is necessary to determine the most appropriate nutritional advice for pregnant women. Copyright © 2013 The Authors.


Calavia R.,Rovira i Virgili University | Annanouch F.E.,Rovira i Virgili University | Correig X.,Rovira i Virgili University | Correig X.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2012

Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics provides a new approach to interrogate mechanistic biochemistry related to natural processes such as health and disease. Physiological and pathological conditions, however, are characterized not only by the identities and concentrations of metabolites present, but also by the location of metabolites within a tissue. Unfortunately, most relevant MS platforms in metabolomics can only measure samples in solution, therefore metabolites are typically extracted by tissue homogenization. Recent developments of imaging-MS technologies, however, have allowed particular metabolites to be spatially localized within biological tissues. In this context, Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS), a matrix-free technique for surface-based analysis, has proven an alternative approach for tissue imaging of metabolites. Here we review the basic principles of NIMS for tissue imaging and show applications that can complement LC/MS and GC/MS-based metabolomic studies investigating the mechanisms of fundamental biological processes. In addition, the new surface modifications and nanostructured materials herein presented demonstrate the versatility of NIMS surface to expand the range of detectable metabolites.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Imaging Mass Spectrometry: A User's Guide to a New Technique for Biological and Biomedical Research. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Aranda N.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Fernandez-Cao J.C.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Tous M.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Arija V.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Arija V.,Institute Universitari dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol
European Journal of Clinical Investigation | Year: 2016

Background: Many chronic diseases are adversely affected by elevated iron levels. It has been speculated that this relationship is mediated by increased oxidative stress, due to the ability of iron to generate reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between elevated iron levels and lipid peroxidation in Caucasian adults residing in the north-eastern Mediterranean region of Spain. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional case-control study included 300 subjects: 150 adults displaying elevated iron levels (cases) selected from a representative sample of our general population and 150 age- and sex-matched adults exhibiting normal iron levels (controls). Dietary assessment (3-day food records), iron biomarkers (serum iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation) and lipid profile were determined. Elevated iron levels were defined by high serum ferritin (SF>110 μg/L in women and>200 μg/L in men) and/or transferrin saturation (TS)>45%. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plasma levels were measured, and oxLDL/LDL-cholesterol ratio was calculated to estimate lipid peroxidation. Multiple linear regression (MLR) models were applied. Results: Individuals with elevated serum iron levels showed increased oxLDL/LDL ratio, but not oxLDL levels, compared to control subjects (20·92 ± 4·89 U/mmol vs. 19·72 ± 3·573 U/mmol, P = 0·028). These results were further confirmed by the regression models adjusted for demographic characteristics, diet, lipid profile and inflammation. Importantly, higher serum levels of triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and lower intake of Vitamin E increased lipid peroxidation. Conclusions: In our general population, we have observed that higher circulating levels of iron, measured by serum ferritin and/or TS, increased lipid peroxidation (measured by oxLDL/LDL ratio). © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Sagarra R.,Institute Universitari dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol | Costa B.,Institute Universitari dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol | Cabre J.J.,Institute Universitari dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol | Sola-Morales O.,Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV | Barrio F.,Institute Universitari dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol
Revista Clinica Espanola | Year: 2014

Background and aims: Transferring the results from clinical trials on type 2 diabetes prevention is the objective of the Diabetes in Europe-Prevention using Lifestyle, Physical Activity and Nutritional intervention (DE-PLAN) project in Catalonia, whose cost-effectiveness analysis is now presented. Patients and methods: A prospective cohort study was performed in primary care involving individuals without diagnosed diabetes aged 45-75 years (n=2054) screened using the questionnaire Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) and a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test. Where feasible, high-risk individuals who were identified (n=552) were allocated sequentially to standard care (n=219), a group-based (n=230) or an individual-level (n=103) intensive (structured programme of six hours using specific teaching techniques) lifestyle intervention (n=333). The primary outcome was the development of diabetes (WHO). We evaluated the cost of resources used with comparison of standard care and the intervention groups in terms of effectiveness and quality of life (15D questionnaire). Results: After 4.2-year median follow-up, the cumulative incidences were 18.3% (14.3-22.9%) in the intensive intervention group and 28.8% (22.9-35.3%) in the standard care group (36.5% relative-risk-reduction). The corresponding 4-year HR was 0.64 (0.47-0.87; P<.004). The incremental cost induced by intensive intervention compared with the standard was 106€ per participant in the individual level and 10€ in the group-based intervention representing 746€ and 108€ per averted case of diabetes, respectively. The estimated incremental cost-utility ratio was 3243€ per quality-adjusted life-years gained. Conclusion: The intensive lifestyle intervention delayed the development of diabetes and was efficient in economic analysis. © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Institute Universitari dInvestigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol and Institute dInvestigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili IISPV
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Revista clinica espanola | Year: 2014

Transferring the results from clinical trials on type 2 diabetes prevention is the objective of the Diabetes in Europe-Prevention using Lifestyle, Physical Activity and Nutritional intervention (DE-PLAN) project in Catalonia, whose cost-effectiveness analysis is now presented.A prospective cohort study was performed in primary care involving individuals without diagnosed diabetes aged 45-75 years (n=2054) screened using the questionnaire Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) and a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test. Where feasible, high-risk individuals who were identified (n=552) were allocated sequentially to standard care (n=219), a group-based (n=230) or an individual-level (n=103) intensive (structured programme of six hours using specific teaching techniques) lifestyle intervention (n=333). The primary outcome was the development of diabetes (WHO). We evaluated the cost of resources used with comparison of standard care and the intervention groups in terms of effectiveness and quality of life (15D questionnaire).After 4.2-year median follow-up, the cumulative incidences were 18.3% (14.3-22.9%) in the intensive intervention group and 28.8% (22.9-35.3%) in the standard care group (36.5% relative-risk-reduction). The corresponding 4-year HR was 0.64 (0.47-0.87; P<.004). The incremental cost induced by intensive intervention compared with the standard was 106 per participant in the individual level and 10 in the group-based intervention representing 746 and 108 per averted case of diabetes, respectively. The estimated incremental cost-utility ratio was 3243 per quality-adjusted life-years gained.The intensive lifestyle intervention delayed the development of diabetes and was efficient in economic analysis.

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