Institute des science Biomedicales Appliquees ISBA

Cotonou, Benin

Institute des science Biomedicales Appliquees ISBA

Cotonou, Benin

Time filter

Source Type

Cottrell G.,Institute Of Recherche Pour Le Developpement Ird | Cottrell G.,University of Paris Descartes | Cottrell G.,Institute des science Biomedicales Appliquees ISBA | Cottrell G.,Center Detudes Et Of Recherche Sur Le Paludisme Associe Grossesse Et nfant | And 22 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Malaria remains endemic in tropical areas, especially in Africa. For the evaluation of new tools and to further our understanding of host-parasite interactions, knowing the environmental risk of transmission-even at a very local scale-is essential. The aim of this study was to assess how malaria transmission is influenced and can be predicted by local climatic and environmental factors. As the entomological part of a cohort study of 650 newborn babies in nine villages in the Tori Bossito district of Southern Benin between June 2007 and February 2010, human landing catches were performed to assess the density of malaria vectors and transmission intensity. Climatic factors as well as household characteristics were recorded throughout the study. Statistical correlations between Anopheles density and environmental and climatic factors were tested using a three-level Poisson mixed regression model. The results showed both temporal variations in vector density (related to season and rainfall), and spatial variations at the level of both village and house. These spatial variations could be largely explained by factors associated with the house's immediate surroundings, namely soil type, vegetation index and the proximity of a watercourse. Based on these results, a predictive regression model was developed using a leave-one-out method, to predict the spatiotemporal variability of malaria transmission in the nine villages. This study points up the importance of local environmental factors in malaria transmission and describes a model to predict the transmission risk of individual children, based on environmental and behavioral characteristics. © 2012 Cottrell et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Le Port A.,Institute Of Recherche Pour Le Developpement Ird | Le Port A.,University of Paris Descartes | Watier L.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Watier L.,University of Versailles | And 27 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Background: The association between placental malaria (PM) and first peripheral parasitaemias in early infancy was assessed in Tori Bossito, a rural area of Benin with a careful attention on transmission factors at an individual level. Methodology: Statistical analysis was performed on 550 infants followed weekly from birth to 12 months. Malaria transmission was assessed by anopheles human landing catches every 6 weeks in 36 sampling houses and season defined by rainfall. Each child was located by GPS and assigned to the closest anopheles sampling house. Data were analysed by survival Cox models, stratified on the possession of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) at enrolment. Principal Findings: Among infants sleeping in a house with an ITN, PM was found to be highly associated to first malaria infections, after adjusting on season, number of anopheles, antenatal care (ANC) visits and maternal severe anaemia. Infants born from a malaria infected placenta had a 2.13 fold increased risk to present a first malaria infection than those born from a non infected placenta ([1.24-3.67], p<0.01) when sleeping in a house with an ITN. The risk to present a first malaria infection was increased by 3.2 to 6.5, according to the level of anopheles exposure (moderate or high levels, compared to the absence of anopheles). Conclusions: First malaria infections in early childhood can be attributed simultaneously to both PM and high levels of exposure to infected anopheles. Protective measures as Intermittent Preventive Treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) and ITNs, targeted on both mothers and infants should be reinforced, as well as the research on new drugs and insecticides. In parallel, investigations on placental malaria have to be strengthened to better understand the mechanisms involved, and thus to protect adequately the infants high risk group. © 2011 Le Port et al.


Keating J.,Tulane University | Finn T.P.,Tulane University | Eisele T.P.,Tulane University | Dery G.,DERMED Consult LLC | And 4 more authors.
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: In malaria-endemic countries, the absence of parasitological confirmation of malaria infection potentially results in overtreatment of non-malaria febrile illness with antimalarial drugs; this may lead to healthcare workers (HCW) missing other treatable illness or wastage of resources. This paper presents results from nationally representative assessments of malaria diagnostic accuracy, quality and capacity in Ghana and the Republic of Benin.METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in December 2012 among a representative sample of health facilities (n=30 per country), using a modified service provision assessment, followed by HCW observations and interviews. To analyze the data we used χ(2) statistics and logistic regression.RESULTS: Malaria microscopy and rapid diagnostic test interpretation was accurate most of the time in both countries. Drugs were generally prescribed in line with positive malaria test results (Ghana: 85.4%, 95% CI: 72.2-98.7; Benin: 83.6%, 95% CI: 68.7-98.4), although some patients with negative malaria test results still received treatment (Ghana: 30.1%, 95% CI: 11.1-49.0; Benin: 37.8%, 95% CI: 22.6-53.0).CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostics for malaria are often performed adequately and accurately in Ghana and Benin, although diagnostic coverage within facilities remains incomplete and some individuals who test negative for malaria receive antimalarial drugs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.


PubMed | DERMED Consult LLC, Institute des science Biomedicales Appliquees ISBA, Tulane University and Institutional Care Division
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2014

In malaria-endemic countries, the absence of parasitological confirmation of malaria infection potentially results in overtreatment of non-malaria febrile illness with antimalarial drugs; this may lead to healthcare workers (HCW) missing other treatable illness or wastage of resources. This paper presents results from nationally representative assessments of malaria diagnostic accuracy, quality and capacity in Ghana and the Republic of Benin.Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in December 2012 among a representative sample of health facilities (n=30 per country), using a modified service provision assessment, followed by HCW observations and interviews. To analyze the data we used (2) statistics and logistic regression.Malaria microscopy and rapid diagnostic test interpretation was accurate most of the time in both countries. Drugs were generally prescribed in line with positive malaria test results (Ghana: 85.4%, 95% CI: 72.2-98.7; Benin: 83.6%, 95% CI: 68.7-98.4), although some patients with negative malaria test results still received treatment (Ghana: 30.1%, 95% CI: 11.1-49.0; Benin: 37.8%, 95% CI: 22.6-53.0).Diagnostics for malaria are often performed adequately and accurately in Ghana and Benin, although diagnostic coverage within facilities remains incomplete and some individuals who test negative for malaria receive antimalarial drugs.

Loading Institute des science Biomedicales Appliquees ISBA collaborators
Loading Institute des science Biomedicales Appliquees ISBA collaborators