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Liviano D.,University of Barcelona | Arauzo-Carod J.-M.,Rovira i Virgili University | Arauzo-Carod J.-M.,Institute Deconomia Of Barcelona Ieb
Regional Studies | Year: 2014

Regional Studies. This paper tries to resolve some of the main shortcomings in the empirical literature on location decisions for new plants, that is, spatial effects and over-dispersion. Spatial effects are omnipresent, being a source of over-dispersion in the data as well as a factor shaping the functional relationship between the variables that explain a firm's location decisions. Using count data models, empirical researchers have dealt with over-dispersion and excess zeros by developments of the Poisson regression model. This study aims to take this a step further by adopting Bayesian methods and models in order to tackle the excess of zeros, spatial and non-spatial over-dispersion, and spatial dependence simultaneously. Data for Catalonia (Spain) are used and location determinants are analysed to that end. The results show that spatial effects are determinant. Additionally, over-dispersion is decomposed into an unstructured independently and identically distributed (i.i.d.) effect and a spatially structured effect. © 2012 Regional Studies Association. Source


Arauzo-Carod J.-M.,Rovira i Virgili University | Arauzo-Carod J.-M.,Institute Deconomia Of Barcelona Ieb
Growth and Change | Year: 2013

This paper is about the role played by the stock of human capital on location decisions of new manufacturing plants. I analyse the effect of several skill levels (from basic school to PhD) on decisions about the location of plants in various industries and, therefore, of different technological levels. I also test whether spatial aggregation level biases the results and determines the most appropriate areas to be considered in the analyses of these phenomena. My main statistical source is the Register of Manufacturing Establishments of Catalonia, which has plant-level microdata on the locations of new manufacturing plants. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Gonzalez-Val R.,University of Zaragoza | Gonzalez-Val R.,Institute Deconomia Of Barcelona Ieb | Lanaspa L.,University of Zaragoza
Regional Studies | Year: 2016

González-Val R. and Lanaspa L. Patterns in US urban growth, 1790–2000, Regional Studies. This paper reconsiders the path of the growth of American cities since 1790 (when the first census was published). The null hypothesis for long-term growth is random growth. Evidence supporting random growth in city sizes is obtained by using panel unit root tests. Growth patterns different from the overall unit root trend detected are also extracted, with evidence found of high intra-distribution mobility (transition matrices) and ‘local’ mean-reverting behaviours (club convergence). The high mobility and the results of the clustering analysis are interpreted as signs of a sequential city growth pattern toward a random growth steady-state. © 2014 Regional Studies Association. Source


Llop M.,Rovira i Virgili University | Arauzo-Carod J.-M.,Rovira i Virgili University | Arauzo-Carod J.-M.,Institute Deconomia Of Barcelona Ieb
Annals of Regional Science | Year: 2012

Nowadays, cultural activities are recognised as having a positive impact on regional and local development. In this paper, we analyse the economic impact of a new museum (the Gaudí Centre) on the regional economy by quantifying the amount of new productive income and new employment it has created. As far as we know, this is the first study to analyse the economic impact of a museum in quantitative terms by using an input-output subsystem analysis in which we differentiate the service sectors, which are closely connected to the museum's direct demand, from the non-service activities, which are not so closely connected. Our results show that the museum has a considerable impact on the regional economy and suggest that cultural investments can play a role in income generation that goes beyond that of mere cultural activities. © 2011 Springer-Verlag. Source


Gonzalez-Val R.,University of Zaragoza | Gonzalez-Val R.,Institute Deconomia Of Barcelona Ieb | Lanaspa L.,University of Zaragoza | Sanz-Gracia F.,University of Zaragoza
Urban Studies | Year: 2014

The aim of this work is to test empirically the validity of Gibrat's law on the growth of cities, using data on the complete distribution of cities (without size restrictions) from three countries (the US, Spain and Italy) for the entire 20th century. In order to achieve this, different techniques are used. First, panel data unit root tests tend to confirm the validity of Gibrat's law in the upper-tail distribution. Secondly, when the entire distribution is considered using non-parametric methods, it is found that Gibrat's law does not hold exactly in the long term (in general, size affects the variance of the growth process but not its mean). Moreover, the log-normal distribution works well as a description of city size distributions across the whole century when no truncation point is considered. © 2013 Urban Studies Journal Limited. Source

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