Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME

Plouzané, France

Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME

Plouzané, France
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Portail M.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Olu K.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Escobar-Briones E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Gelinas Y.,Concordia University at Montréal | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

In the Guaymas Basin, the presence of cold seeps and hydrothermal vents in close proximity, similar sedimentary settings and comparable depths offers a unique opportunity to assess and compare the functioning of these deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems. The food webs of five seep and four vent assemblages were studied using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses. Although the two ecosystems shared similar potential basal sources, their food webs differed: seeps relied predominantly on methanotrophy and thiotrophy via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham(CBB) cycle and vents on petroleum-derived organic matter and thiotrophy via the CBB and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles. In contrast to symbiotic species, the heterotrophic fauna exhibited high trophic flexibility among assemblages, suggesting weak trophic links to the metabolic diversity of chemosynthetic primary producers. At both ecosystems, food webs did not appear to be organised through predator-prey links but rather through weak trophic relationships among co-occurring species. Examples of trophic or spatial niche differentiation highlighted the importance of species-sorting processes within chemosynthetic ecosystems. Variability in food web structure, addressed through Bayesian metrics, revealed consistent trends across ecosystems. Food-web complexity significantly decreased with increasing methane concentrations, a common proxy for the intensity of seep and vent fluid fluxes. Although high fluid-fluxes have the potential to enhance primary productivity, they generate environmental constraints that may limit microbial diversity, colonisation of consumers and the structuring role of competitive interactions, leading to an overall reduction of food-web complexity and an increase in trophic redundancy. Heterogeneity provided by foundation species was identified as an additional structuring factor. According to their biological activities, foundation species may have the potential to partly release the competitive pressure within communities of low fluid-flux habitats. Finally, ecosystem functioning in vents and seeps was highly similar despite environmental differences (e.g. physico-chemistry, dominant basal sources) suggesting that ecological niches are not specifically linked to the nature of fluids. This comparison of seep and vent functioning in the Guaymas basin thus provides further supports to the hypothesis of continuity among deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems. © 2016 Portail et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Lee R.W.,Washington State University | Robert K.,University of Southampton | Matabos M.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Bates A.E.,UK National Oceanography Center | Juniper S.K.,University of Victoria
Deep-Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers | Year: 2015

A significant focus of hydrothermal vent ecological studies has been to understand how species cope with various stressors through physiological tolerance and biochemical resistance. Yet, the environmental conditions experienced by vent species have not been well characterized. This objective requires continuous observations over time intervals that can capture environmental variability at scales that are relevant to animals. We used autonomous temperature logger arrays (four roughly parallel linear arrays of 12 loggers spaced every 10-12. cm) to study spatial and temporal variations in the thermal regime experienced by hydrothermal vent macrofauna at a diffuse flow vent. Hourly temperatures were recorded over eight months from 2010 to 2011 at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour vent field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, a focus area of the Ocean Networks Canada cabled observatory. The conspicuous animal assemblages in video footage contained Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, gastropods (primarily Lepetodrilus fucensis), and polychaetes (polynoid scaleworms and the palm worm Paralvinella palmiformis). Two dimensional spatial gradients in temperature were generally stable over the deployment period. The average temperature recorded by all arrays, and in some individual loggers, revealed distinctive fluctuations in temperature that often corresponded with the tidal cycle. We postulate that this may be related to changes in bottom currents or fluctuations in vent discharge. A marked transient temperature increase lasting over a period of days was observed in April 2011. While the distributions and behavior of Juan de Fuca Ridge vent invertebrates may be partially constrained by environmental temperature and temperature tolerance, except for the one transient high-temperature event, observed fluid temperatures were generally similar to the thermal preferences for some species, and typically well below lethal temperatures for all species. Average temperatures of the four arrays ranged from 4.1 to 11.0. °C during the deployment, indicating that on an hourly timescale the temperature conditions in this tubeworm community were fairly moderate and stable. The generality of these findings and behavioral responses of vent organisms to predictable rhythmicity and non-periodic temperature shifts are areas for further investigation. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Concordia University at Montréal, National Autonomous University of Mexico and Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

In the Guaymas Basin, the presence of cold seeps and hydrothermal vents in close proximity, similar sedimentary settings and comparable depths offers a unique opportunity to assess and compare the functioning of these deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems. The food webs of five seep and four vent assemblages were studied using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses. Although the two ecosystems shared similar potential basal sources, their food webs differed: seeps relied predominantly on methanotrophy and thiotrophy via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle and vents on petroleum-derived organic matter and thiotrophy via the CBB and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles. In contrast to symbiotic species, the heterotrophic fauna exhibited high trophic flexibility among assemblages, suggesting weak trophic links to the metabolic diversity of chemosynthetic primary producers. At both ecosystems, food webs did not appear to be organised through predator-prey links but rather through weak trophic relationships among co-occurring species. Examples of trophic or spatial niche differentiation highlighted the importance of species-sorting processes within chemosynthetic ecosystems. Variability in food web structure, addressed through Bayesian metrics, revealed consistent trends across ecosystems. Food-web complexity significantly decreased with increasing methane concentrations, a common proxy for the intensity of seep and vent fluid fluxes. Although high fluid-fluxes have the potential to enhance primary productivity, they generate environmental constraints that may limit microbial diversity, colonisation of consumers and the structuring role of competitive interactions, leading to an overall reduction of food-web complexity and an increase in trophic redundancy. Heterogeneity provided by foundation species was identified as an additional structuring factor. According to their biological activities, foundation species may have the potential to partly release the competitive pressure within communities of low fluid-flux habitats. Finally, ecosystem functioning in vents and seeps was highly similar despite environmental differences (e.g. physico-chemistry, dominant basal sources) suggesting that ecological niches are not specifically linked to the nature of fluids. This comparison of seep and vent functioning in the Guaymas basin thus provides further supports to the hypothesis of continuity among deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems.


Martin C.,American Museum of Natural History | Ponzevera E.,Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory | Ponzevera E.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Harlow G.,American Museum of Natural History
Chemical Geology | Year: 2015

Boron and Li are light, incompatible elements that preferentially partition into the liquid phase, whether melt or aqueous fluid, and thus are useful for tracking fluid-related processes in rocks. Most of the Li isotopic data presently available on subduction-related rocks are from whole-rock analyses; and the B isotopic analyses of subduction material have been carried out either on whole-rocks or in-situ on an accessory phase, such as tourmaline. The new method presented here couples an ESI New Wave UP-193-FX ArF* (193. nm) excimer laser-ablation microscope with a Neptune Plus (Thermo Scientific) MC-ICP-MS aiming to measure both Li and B isotopes in situ with good spatial resolution (metamorphic minerals are commonly chemically zoned, and whole-rock analyses lose this detail). The data thus obtained are compared with SIMS analyses on the same mineral samples for B, and with MC-ICP-MS analyses on whole-rock or mineral separates from the same sample for Li. Additionally, data acquired on tourmaline standards were compared to SIMS values. The results show that for B concentrations above 5. μg/g, the data obtained by LA-MC-ICP-MS and by SIMS are identical within error, for mica (phengitic muscovite), pyroxene (jadeite), serpentine (antigorite), and tourmaline. For Li concentrations above 10. μg/g, the data obtained by LA-MC-ICP-MS and by MC-ICP-MS are also identical, within error, for mica (phengitic muscovite), and pyroxene (jadeite). However, analyses of tourmaline standards have shown significant differences with reference values, so LA-MC-ICP-MS does not yet appear to be an appropriate method to analyze Li isotopes in tourmalines. Thus, LA-MC-ICP-MS is a suitable method to measure Li and B isotopes with good spatial resolution in major rock-forming silicates from subduction-related rocks where concentrations exceed 10. μg/g and 5. μg/g, respectively, with an error on individual measurements equal to or less than previously used methods, but obtainable in a significantly shorter amount of time. The external reproducibility is ±. 2.88 to 3.31‰ for B and ±. 1.50 to 1.75‰ for Li, which is lower than or equal to the variations encountered within a given chemically zoned sample (up to 10‰ of variation within a given natural sample). © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Matabos M.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Cuvelier D.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Brouard J.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Shillito B.,Paris-Sorbonne University | And 8 more authors.
Deep-Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography | Year: 2015

Identifying the factors driving community dynamics in hydrothermal vent communities, and in particular biological interactions, is challenged by our ability to make direct observations and the difficulty to conduct experiments in those remote ecosystems. As a result, we have very limited knowledge on species' behaviour and interactions in these communities and how they in turn influence community dynamics. Interactions such as competition or predation significantly affect community structure in vent communities, and video time-series have successfully been used to gain insights in biological interactions and species behaviour, including responses to short-term changes in temperature or feeding strategies. In this study, we combined in situ and ex situ approaches to characterise the behaviour and interactions among two key species encountered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR): the shrimp Mirocaris fortunata and the crab Segonzacia mesatlantica. In situ, species small-scale distribution, interactions and behaviour were studied using the TEMPO observatory module deployed on the seafloor at the base of the active Eiffel Tower edifice in the Lucky Strike vent field as part of the EMSO-Açores MoMAR observatory. TEMPO sampled 2. min of video four times a day from July 2011 to April 2012. One week of observations per month was used for 'long-term' variations, and a full video data set was analysed for January 2012. In addition, observations of crab and shrimp individuals maintained for the first time under controlled conditions in atmospheric pressure (classic tank) and pressurised (AbyssBox) aquaria allowed better characterisation and description of the different types of behaviour and interactions observed in nature. While the identified in situ spatial distribution pattern was stable over the nine months, both species displayed a significant preference for mussel bed and anhydrite substrata, and preferentially occupied the area located directly in the fluid flow axis. The aggregation behaviour of M. fortunata resulted in the occurrence of numerous intraspecific interactions mainly involving the use of two pairs of sensory organs (antenna/antennule) and fleeing behaviours when in contact or close to individuals of S. mesatlantica. The higher level of passiveness observed in the ex situ artificial environment compared to the in situ environment was attributed to the lack of stimulation related to low densities of congeners and/or of sympatric species compared to the natural environment and the absence of continuous food supply, as both species displayed a significant higher level of activity during feeding time. This result emphasises the role of food supply as a driver of species distribution and behaviour. Direct in situ observations using cameras deployed on deep-sea observatories, combined with experimental set-up in pressurised aquaria, will help investigators understand the factors influencing community dynamics and species biology at vents as well as their underlying mechanisms. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Ritt B.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Ritt B.,Temple University | Desbruyeres D.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Caprais J.-C.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | And 5 more authors.
Marine Ecology Progress Series | Year: 2012

The Mediterranean Sea constitutes a unique environment to study cold-seep ecosystems due to the presence of different geodynamic settings, from an active margin along the Mediterranean Ridge (MR) to a passive margin in the Nile Deep-Sea Fan (NDSF). We attempted to identify the structure of benthic communities associated with the Napoli and Amsterdam mud volcanoes (MVs) located on the MR and to establish the links between faunal distribution and environmental conditions at different spatial scales. Comparison between the 2 MVs revealed that the faunal distribution seemed to be mainly controlled by the characteristics of the microhabitats. On both geological structures, the variability between the different microhabitats was higher than the variability observed between replicates of the same microhabitat, and the distribution of macrofauna was apparently linked to gradients in physico-chemical conditions. The peripheral sites from Napoli were generally more oxygenated and harboured lower species richness than the active sites. The reduced sediment microhabitat from Amsterdam presented the highest methane concentrations and was mainly colonised by symbiont-bearing vesicomyid bivalves and heterotrophic dorvilleid polychaetes. Overall, a higher taxonomic diversity was observed on Napoli. Substratum type was hypothesised to be the second factor influencing faunal distribution. The results of this study highlight the high heterogeneity of faunal communities associated with seep ecosystems within this region and the need to pursue investigations at various spatial and temporal scales. © Inter-Research 2012.


Portail M.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Olu K.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Escobar-Briones E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Caprais J.C.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | And 6 more authors.
Biogeosciences | Year: 2015

Understanding the ecological processes and connectivity of chemosynthetic deep-sea ecosystems requires comparative studies. In the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico), the presence of seeps and vents in the absence of a biogeographic barrier, and comparable sedimentary settings and depths offers a unique opportunity to assess the role of ecosystem-specific environmental conditions on macrofaunal communities. Six seep and four vent assemblages were studied, three of which were characterised by common major foundation taxa: vesicomyid bivalves, siboglinid tubeworms and microbial mats. Macrofaunal community structure at the family level showed that density, diversity and composition patterns were primarily shaped by seep-and vent-common abiotic factors including methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations, whereas vent environmental specificities (higher temperature, higher metal concentrations and lower pH) were not significant. The type of substratum and the heterogeneity provided by foundation species were identified as additional structuring factors and their roles were found to vary according to fluid regimes. At the family level, seep and vent similarity reached at least 58 %. All vent families were found at seeps and each seep-specific family displayed low relative abundances (< 5 %). Moreover, 85 % of the identified species among dominant families were shared between seep and vent ecosystems. This study provides further support to the hypothesis of continuity among deep-sea seep and vent ecosystems. © Author(s) 2015. CC Attribution 3.0 License.


Sarrazin J.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Cuvelier D.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Peton L.,University of Western Brittany | Legendre P.,University of Montréal | Sarradin P.M.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME
Deep-Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers | Year: 2014

Although the spatial distribution of hydrothermal vent assemblages in relation to environmental conditions has been assessed in several studies, there is little documented data on the temporal variation of the fauna and corresponding abiotic factors in a vent community. Here, we present one of the longest integrated (faunal and environmental data) time series ever obtained in a hydrothermal ecosystem. The data were acquired using the TEMPO ecological module that was deployed between 2006 and 2008 on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, providing the first insights into the day-to-day variations in a Bathymodiolus azoricus mussel assemblage from the Lucky Strike vent field for the 48 days during which the video camera operated. The time-series yielded additional valuable information on longer-term variation in faunal distribution (comparing ~2 years), temperature (11.7 months) and iron concentrations (3.8 months).Results from daily observations showed that the vent mussel assemblage was quite stable over the 48 days of the study, reflecting the relative stability of environmental conditions during this period. B. azoricus mussels appeared to thrive in areas of very limited hydrothermal fluid input in habitats that are, as in other deep-sea ecosystems, significantly influenced by ocean tidal signals. Variation in species abundance was observed but, with the exception of Mirocaris fortunata shrimp, no links could be established with measured environmental variables. Although we did not observe any clear tidal influence on vent fauna, it is likely that physiological processes and species' activities are influenced by these periodic variations. Longer time series are currently being acquired by different experiments deployed on the EMSO-Açores MoMAR observatory (2010-2013 and still recording). They should further improve our knowledge of the dynamics of hydrothermal systems and their associated faunal communities. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Lampadariou N.,Hellenic Center for Marine Research | Kalogeropoulou V.,Hellenic Center for Marine Research | Sevastou K.,Hellenic Center for Marine Research | Keklikoglou K.,University of Crete | Sarrazin J.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME
Biogeosciences | Year: 2013

Mud volcanoes are a∼special type of cold seeps where life is based on chemoautotrophic processes. They are considered to be extreme environments and are characterized by unique megafaunal and macrofaunal communities. However, very few studies on mud volcanoes taking into account the smaller meiobenthic communities have been carried out. Two mud volcanoes were explored during the MEDECO (MEditerranean Deep-sea ECOsystems) cruise (2007) with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Victor-6000: Amsterdam, located south of Turkey between 1700 and 2000 m depth (Anaximander mud field); and Napoli, south of Crete, located along the Mediterranean Ridge at about 2000 m depth (Olimpi mud field). The major aim of this study was to describe distributional patterns of meiofaunal communities and nematode assemblages from different seep microhabitats. Meiofaunal taxa and nematode assemblages at both mud volcanoes differed significantly from other Mediterranean sites in terms of standing stocks, dominance and species diversity. Density and biomass values were significantly higher at the seep sites, particularly at Amsterdam. Patterns of nematode diversity, the dominant meiofaunal taxon, varied, displaying both very high or very low species richness and dominance, depending on the microhabitat studied. The periphery of the Lamellibrachia and bivalve shell microhabitats of Napoli exhibited the highest species richness, while the reduced sediments of Amsterdam yielded a species-poor nematode community dominated by two successful species, one belonging to the genus Aponema and the other to the genus Sabatieria. Analysis of β-diversity showed that microhabitat heterogeneity of mud volcanoes contributed substantially to the total nematode species richness in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. These observations indicate a strong influence of mud volcanoes and cold-seep ecosystems on the meiofaunal communities and nematode assemblages. © 2013 Author(s).


Cuvelier D.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Legendre P.,University of Montréal | Laes A.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Sarradin P.-M.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME | Sarrazin J.,Institute Carnot Ifremer EDROME
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

The NEPTUNE cabled observatory network hosts an ecological module called TEMPO-mini that focuses on hydrothermal vent ecology and time series, granting us real-time access to data originating from the deep sea. In 2011-2012, during TEMPO-mini's first deployment on the NEPTUNE network, the module recorded high-resolution imagery, temperature, iron (Fe) and oxygen on a hydrothermal assemblage at 2186 m depth at Main Endeavour Field (North East Pacific). 23 days of continuous imagery were analysed with an hourly frequency. Community dynamics were analysed in detail for Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, Polynoidae, Pycnogonida and Buccinidae, documenting faunal variations, natural change and biotic interactions in the filmed tubeworm assemblage as well as links with the local environment. Semi-diurnal and diurnal periods were identified both in fauna and environment, revealing the influence of tidal cycles. Species interactions were described and distribution patterns were indicative of possible microhabitat preference. The importance of high-resolution frequencies (,1 h) to fully comprehend rhythms in fauna and environment was emphasised, as well as the need for the development of automated or semi-automated imagery analysis tools. © 2014 Cuvelier et al.

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