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Bundchen D.C.,Institute Cardiologia Of Cruz Alta Icca | Panigas C.F.,Institute Cardiologia Of Cruz Alta Icca | Dipp T.,Institute Cardiologia Of Cruz Alta Icca | Panigas T.F.,Institute Cardiologia Of Cruz Alta Icca | And 4 more authors.
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia | Year: 2010

Background: Hypertension (H) is associated with a large number of co-morbidities, including obesity. The correlation between two variables has been investigated. Objective: To analyze the correlation between the loss of body mass and blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients undergoing exercising programs (EP). Methods: One hundred eleven hypertensive patients with overweight or obesity were randomly divided into an experimental group (EG). Out of these, 57 (58 ± 8.9 years old) participated in a three-month EP conducted three times a week in aerobic exercise sessions from 50% to 70% of VO2 peak for 30 to 60 minutes and resistance exercises; and a control group (CG) with 54 (60 ± 7.7 years old) who did not participate in the EP. In the EG, blood pressure (BP) was measured before each session and the measurement of anthropometric variables (AV) at the beginning of the program and after three months. In the CG the BP and the VA were evaluated in the doctor's office at the beginning and at the end of the study. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Pearson correlation and t test were used. A value of p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In the CG there was no significant difference in AV and BP at the beginning and at the end of the study. In the EG, there was no significant alteration in the AV, however, there was blood pressure reduction of 12% in systolic BP (-17.5 mmHg, p = 0.001) and 9% in Diastolic BP (-8.1 mmHg, p = 0. 01) at the end of the study. There was no correlation between the AV and decrease in BP (r = 0.1). Conclusion: The blood pressure reduction was not correlated with reduction of anthropometric measures after the exercising period.

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