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Filgueiras C.C.,State University of Rio de Janeiro | Filgueiras C.C.,Institute Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes | Pohl-Guimaraes F.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Krahe T.E.,Virginia Commonwealth University | And 2 more authors.
Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior | Year: 2013

The brain is extremely vulnerable to teratogenic insults during the brain growth spurt, a period that starts during the third trimester of human gestation and is characterized by synaptogenesis establishment of neuronal circuits. While the treatment of epilepsy during pregnancy increases the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in offspring, the consequences of exposure to anticonvulsants during the brain growth spurt remain poorly known. Here we investigate whether exposure to sodium valproate (VPA) during a similar period in rats impairs spatial learning of juvenile rats. Long-Evans rats were exposed to VPA (200 mg/kg) or saline solution (SAL) every other day between postnatal day (PN) 4 and PN10. At PN23 and PN30, Morris water maze performance was evaluated during 6 consecutive days. In the group of animals which started their tests at PN23, the VPA exposure impaired both, swimming speed and learning/memory performance. Interestingly, no differences were observed between VPA and control animals tested from PN30 to PN35. Our data suggests that the neurobehavioral deficits caused by VPA exposure during the brain growth spurt are transitory. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Da Silva Sergio L.P.,Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos | Da Silva Marciano R.,Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos | Teixeira G.R.,Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos | Da Silva Canuto K.,Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos | And 8 more authors.
Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences | Year: 2013

A low-intensity laser is used in treating herpes labialis based on the biostimulative effect, albeit the photobiological basis is not well understood. In this work experimental models based on Escherichia coli cultures and plasmids were used to evaluate effects of low-intensity red laser on DNA at fluences for treatment of herpes labialis. To this end, survival and transformation efficiency of plasmids in E. coli AB1157 (wild type), BH20 (fpg/mutM -) and BW9091 (xthA-), content of the supercoiled form of plasmid DNA, as well as nucleic acids and protein content from bacterial cultures exposed to the laser, were evaluated. The data indicate low-intensity red laser: (i) alters the survival of plasmids in wild type, fpg/mutM - and xthA-E. coli cultures depending of growth phase, (ii) alters the content of the supercoiled form of plasmids in the wild type and fpg/mutM-E. coli cells, (iii) alters the content of nucleic acids and proteins in wild type E. coli cells, (iv) alters the transformation efficiency of plasmids in wild type and fpg/mutM-E. coli competent cells. These data could be used to understand positive effects of low-intensity lasers on herpes labialis treatment. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies.


Mandarim-De-Lacerda C.,Institute Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes | Santos-Filho S.D.,State University of Rio de Janeiro | Bernardo-Filho M.,State University of Rio de Janeiro
Indian Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2012

Background: Serum levels of total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) reflect endogenous growth hormone (GH) secretion in healthy adults, which makes it a good diagnostic marker for screening of GH-related disorders. Studies also have supported a possible relation between IGF-I levels and the risk and prognostic for some malignancies, besides a relation between IGF-I levels and mortality. Objective: As the determination of the IGF-I normal values for local populations is strongly desired, the aim of this investigation was to determine reference values for IGF-I using an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in an adult Brazilian population of Rio de Janeiro city, since there is no other study using this methodology in Brazilian population, and that this method is widely used in Brazil and worldwide. Materials and Methods: The study included samples of blood taken from 484 healthy subjects (251 men and 233 women) aged 18-70. The subjects agreed with this study, approved by the Ethical Committee of the Instituto Estadual de Hematologia Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The samples were analyzed using a Diagnostic System Laboratories kit. For data analysis, age-and sex-specific figures were fitted after transformation of IGF-I values. Results: In adulthood, a slow age-dependent decrease was found. There was no significant difference in IGF-I values between men and women. Conclusion: This study established age-specific IGF-I reference values, for a healthy Brazilian adult population, determined by a widely IGF-I, IRMA used currently in Brazil.


Lazoski C.,Institute Biologia | Gusmao J.,Institute Biologia | Gusmao J.,Institute Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes | Boudry P.,French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea | Sole-Cava A.M.,Institute Biologia
Marine Ecology Progress Series | Year: 2011

The phylogenetic relationships between naturally occurring Atlantic Crassostrea oyster species were inferred through analyses of mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S) and nuclear (second internal transcribed spacer) sequences. We also scored 15 allozyme loci on 422 oysters to study population structuring of C. rhizophorae and C. brasiliana along 9000 km of the Western Atlantic coastline. Despite morphological similarities, C. virginica was genetically more closely related to C. rhizophorae than to C. brasiliana. In contrast, C. paraibanensis was genetically indistinguishable from C. brasiliana, which is probably a junior synonym of the African C. gasar. Significant genetic differentiation between populations of C. rhizophorae and C. gasar were found along the Western Atlantic coast, supporting an isolation-by-distance pattern. © 2011 Inter-Research.


Da Silva Marciano R.,Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos | Da Silva Sergio L.P.,Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos | Polignano G.A.C.,Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos | Presta G.A.,Rio de Janeiro State Federal University | And 9 more authors.
Photochemical and Photobiological Sciences | Year: 2012

Low-intensity red lasers are proposed for treatment of oral aphthous ulcers based on biostimulative effects. However, effects of low-intensity lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity red laser on survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. Escherichia coli cultures were exposed to laser (660 nm, 100 mW, 25 and 45 J cm -2) to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, bacterial plasmids were exposed to laser to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile and action of DNA repair enzymes. Data indicate that low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on survival of E. coli wild type, exonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein but decreased the survival of endonuclease III deficient cultures; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) there was no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, (iv) there was no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and endonuclease III enzymes, but it altered the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III. Low-intensity red laser at therapeutic fluences has an effect on the survival of E. coli endonuclease III deficient cells, induces bacterial filamentation in E. coli cultures and DNA lesions targeted by exonuclease III. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies.

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