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Menezes G.B.L.,Laboratorio Of Patologia E Biologia Molecular Fiocruz | Pereira F.A.,Laboratorio Of Patologia E Biologia Molecular Fiocruz | Duarte C.A.B.,Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana | Carmo T.M.A.,Laboratorio Of Patologia E Biologia Molecular Fiocruz | And 5 more authors.
Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Year: 2012

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be detected in blood and other bodily fluids, such as saliva, semen and gastric juices. The aim of this study was to compare the HCV viral loads in the serum and saliva of infected patients. Twenty-nine patients with detectable HCV RNA in their serum and saliva were included in this study. The HCV viral loads were determined through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions. The median viral RNA levels were 5.78 log10 copies in the serum and 3.32 log10 copies in the saliva. We observed that the salivary HCV viral load was significantly lower than the viral load in the serum. Further studies are required to understand the role of saliva in the diagnosis, management and potential transmission of HCV.


Hamedi A.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Botelho L.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Britto C.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Fragoso S.P.,Institute Biologia Molecular Do Parana | And 4 more authors.
Molecular and Biochemical Parasitology | Year: 2015

The Trypanosoma cruzi adenylyl cyclase (AC) multigene family encodes different isoforms (around 15) sharing a variable large N-terminal domain, which is extracellular and receptor-like, followed by a transmembrane helix and a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain. It was proposed that these key enzymes in the cAMP signalling pathway allow the parasite to sense its changing extracellular milieu in order to rapidly adapt to its new environment, which is generally achieved through a differentiation process. One of the critical differentiation events the parasitic protozoan T. cruzi undergoes during its life cycle, known as metacyclogenesis, occurs in the digestive tract of the insect and corresponds to the differentiation from noninfective epimastigotes to infective metacyclic trypomastigote forms. By in vitro monitoring the activity of AC during metacyclogenesis, we showed that both the activity of AC and the intracellular cAMP content follow a similar pattern of transient stimulation in a two-step process, with a first activation peak occurring during the first hours of nutritional stress and a second peak between 6 and 48 h, corresponding to the cellular adhesion. During this differentiation process, a general mechanism of upregulation of AC expression of both mRNA and protein is triggered and in particular for a major subclass of these enzymes that are present in various gene copies commonly associated to the THT gene clusters. Although the scattered genome distribution of these gene copies is rather unusual in trypanosomatids and seems to be a recent acquisition in the evolution of the T. cruzi clade, their encoded product redistributed on the flagellum of the parasite upon differentiation could be important to sense the extracellular milieu. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Meuser-Batista M.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Correa J.R.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Carvalho V.F.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | De Carvalho Britto C.F.D.P.,Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | And 8 more authors.
American Journal of Pathology | Year: 2011

Although the roles of mast cells (MCs) are essential in many inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, their role in Trypanosoma cruziinduced cardiomyopathy is unexplored. In this study, we treated infected CBA mice with cromolyn, an MC stabilizer, and observed much greater parasitemia and interferon-γ levels, higher mortality, myocarditis, and cardiac damage. Although these data show that MCs are important in controlling acute infection, we observed MC apoptosis in the cardiac tissue and peritoneal cavity of untreated mice. In the heart, pericardial mucosal MC die, perhaps because of reduced amounts of local stem cell factor. Using RT-PCR in purified cardiac MCs, we observed that infection induced transcription of P2X 7 receptor and Fas, two molecules reportedly involved in cell death and inflammatory regulation. In gld/gld mice (FasL -/-), apoptosis of cardiac, but not peritoneal, MCs was decreased. Conversely, infection of P2X 7 -/- mice led to reduced peritoneal, but not cardiac, MC death. These data illustrate the immunomodulatory role played by MCs in T. cruzi infection and the complexity of molecular interactions that control inflammatory pathways in different tissues and compartments. © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology.


PubMed | Instituto Carlos Chagas, Free University of Colombia, Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular and biochemical parasitology | Year: 2015

The Trypanosoma cruzi adenylyl cyclase (AC) multigene family encodes different isoforms (around 15) sharing a variable large N-terminal domain, which is extracellular and receptor-like, followed by a transmembrane helix and a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain. It was proposed that these key enzymes in the cAMP signalling pathway allow the parasite to sense its changing extracellular milieu in order to rapidly adapt to its new environment, which is generally achieved through a differentiation process. One of the critical differentiation events the parasitic protozoan T. cruzi undergoes during its life cycle, known as metacyclogenesis, occurs in the digestive tract of the insect and corresponds to the differentiation from noninfective epimastigotes to infective metacyclic trypomastigote forms. By in vitro monitoring the activity of AC during metacyclogenesis, we showed that both the activity of AC and the intracellular cAMP content follow a similar pattern of transient stimulation in a two-step process, with a first activation peak occurring during the first hours of nutritional stress and a second peak between 6 and 48 h, corresponding to the cellular adhesion. During this differentiation process, a general mechanism of upregulation of AC expression of both mRNA and protein is triggered and in particular for a major subclass of these enzymes that are present in various gene copies commonly associated to the THT gene clusters. Although the scattered genome distribution of these gene copies is rather unusual in trypanosomatids and seems to be a recent acquisition in the evolution of the T. cruzi clade, their encoded product redistributed on the flagellum of the parasite upon differentiation could be important to sense the extracellular milieu.


PubMed | Federal University of Ouro Preto, Instituto Carlos Chagas, Federal University of São Paulo, Federal University of Minas Gerais and Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana
Type: | Journal: Molecular and biochemical parasitology | Year: 2017

In recent years, proteasome involvement in the damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) became evident. However, whether proteasome plays a direct or indirect role in IR-induced damage response still unclear. Trypanosoma cruzi is a human parasite capable of remarkable high tolerance to IR, suggesting a highly efficient damage response system. Here, we investigate the role of T. cruzi proteasome in the damage response induced by IR. We exposed epimastigotes to high doses of gamma ray and we analyzed the expression and subcellular localization of several components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We show that proteasome inhibition increases IR-induced cell growth arrest and proteasome-mediated proteolysis is altered after parasite exposure. We observed nuclear accumulation of 19S and 20S proteasome subunits in response to IR treatments. Intriguingly, the dynamic of 19S particle nuclear accumulation was more similar to the dynamic observed for Rad51 nuclear translocation than the observed for 20S. In the other hand, 20S increase and nuclear translocation could be related with an increase of its regulator PA26 and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in vitro. The intersection between the opposed peaks of 19S and 20S protein levels was marked by nuclear accumulation of both 20S and 19S together with Ubiquitin, suggesting a role of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nuclear protein turnover at the time. Our results revealed the importance of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in T. cruzi IR-induced damage response suggesting that proteasome is also involved in T. cruzi IR tolerance. Moreover, our data support the possible direct/signaling role of 19S in DNA damage repair. Based on these results, we speculate that spatial and temporal differences between the 19S particle and 20S proteasome controls proteasome multiple roles in IR damage response.


PubMed | Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana and Federal Technological University of Paraná
Type: | Journal: Journal of immunological methods | Year: 2016

Diverse techniques have been developed to analyze antibody-mediated responses to infections. However, the most common tests, i.e., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, require separate reactions for each antigen and consequently necessitate large sample volumes. Luminex technology allows the detection of multiple antibodies in a single experiment, but nonspecific binding can impair the results. Therefore, we examined the use of Escherichia coli lysates to reduce nonspecific binding and improve the results of liquid microarrays based on Luminex technology. Anti-bacteria antibodies were detected in human serum samples, as evidenced by high median fluorescence intensity (MFI) in assays performed with paramagnetic microspheres coupled with E. coli lysates. Moreover, the addition of an E. coli lysate as a blocker reduced the nonspecific binding of antigens produced by E. coli in a concentration-dependent manner. Tris-HCl reduced MFI values in negative samples, but did not affect MFI for positive samples. For microspheres coupled with different antigens, an E. coli lysate blocker significantly improved the fluorescence signals from positive samples. The addition of Tris-HCl and the E. coli lysate induced antigen-specific differences in MFI. This combination of the E. coli lysate blocker and Tris-HCl yielded a statistically significant improvement in MFI in the assays for Chagas disease and hepatitis C virus samples. However, for the Treponema pallidum p47 antigen improvement in MFI was only observed for the preparation with the E. coli blocker at a concentration of 3%. In conclusion, the addition of an E. coli lysate and Tris-HCl to the microarray assay reduced the nonspecific binding of human anti-bacteria antibodies and, therefore, increased the specific MFI.


Schmidt J.C.,Instituto Carlos Chagas Fiocruz | Schmidt J.C.,Chapecó Region Community University | Soares M.J.,Instituto Carlos Chagas Fiocruz | Goldenberg S.,Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana | And 4 more authors.
Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz | Year: 2011

The life cycle of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi exposes it to several environmental stresses in its invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. Stress conditions are involved in parasite differentiation, but little is known about the stress response proteins involved. We report here the first characterization of stress-induced protein-1 (STI-1) in T. cruzi (TcSTI-1). This co-chaperone is produced in response to stress and mediates the formation of a complex between the stress proteins HSP70 and HSP90 in other organisms. Despite the similarity of TcSTI-1 to STI-1 proteins in other organisms, its expression profile in response to various stress conditions, such as heat shock, acidic pH or nutrient starvation, is quite different. Neither polysomal mRNA nor protein levels changed in exponentially growing epimastigotes cultured under any of the stress conditions studied. Increased levels of TcSTI-1 were observed in epimastigotes subjected to nutritional stress in the late growth phase. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed an association between TcSTI-1 and TcHSP70 in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Immunolocalization demonstrated that TcSTI-1 was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and there was some colocalization of TcSTI-1 and TcHSP70 around the nucleus. Thus, TcSTI-1 associates with TcHSP70 and TcSTI-1 expression is induced when the parasites are subjected to stress conditions during specific growth phase.


Marton S.,Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana | Cleto F.,Instituto Carlos Chagas | Krieger M.A.,Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana | Cardoso J.,Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Escherichia coli is a bacterial species found ubiquitously in the intestinal flora of animals, although pathogenic variants cause major public health problems. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity, and have great potential for use in diagnostics and therapy. We used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to isolate four single stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers that bind strongly to E. coli cells (ATCC generic strain 25922), with Kd values in the nanomolar range. Fluorescently labeled aptamers label the surface of E. coli cells, as viewed by fluorescent microscopy. Specificity tests with twelve different bacterial species showed that one of the aptamers-called P12-31-is highly specific for E. coli. Importantly, this aptamer binds to Meningitis/sepsis associated E. coli (MNEC) clinical isolates, and is the first aptamer described with potential for use in the diagnosis of MNEC-borne pathologies. © 2016 Marton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


PubMed | Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Escherichia coli is a bacterial species found ubiquitously in the intestinal flora of animals, although pathogenic variants cause major public health problems. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity, and have great potential for use in diagnostics and therapy. We used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to isolate four single stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers that bind strongly to E. coli cells (ATCC generic strain 25922), with Kd values in the nanomolar range. Fluorescently labeled aptamers label the surface of E. coli cells, as viewed by fluorescent microscopy. Specificity tests with twelve different bacterial species showed that one of the aptamers-called P12-31-is highly specific for E. coli. Importantly, this aptamer binds to Meningitis/sepsis associated E. coli (MNEC) clinical isolates, and is the first aptamer described with potential for use in the diagnosis of MNEC-borne pathologies.


PubMed | Institute Biologia Molecular do Parana and Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN)
Type: | Journal: Journal of microbiology and biotechnology | Year: 2017

Sepsis is a major health problem worldwide, with an extremely high rate of morbidity and mortality, partly due to delayed diagnosis during early disease. Currently, sepsis diagnosis requires bacterial culturing of blood samples over several days, while PCR-based molecular diagnosis methods are faster, but lack sensitivity. The use of biosensors containing nucleic acid aptamers that bind targets with high affinity and specificity could accelerate sepsis diagnosis. Previously, we used Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) to develop the aptamers Antibac1 and Antibac2, targeting the ubiquitous bacterial peptidoglycan. Here, we show that these aptamers bind to four Gram-positive and seven Gram-negative bacterial sepsis agents with high binding efficiency. Thus, these aptamers could be used in combination as biological recognition elements in the development of biosensors that are an alternative to rapid bacteria detection, since they could provide culture and amplification-free tests for rapid clinical sepsis diagnosis.

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