Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic

Cabezón de la Sal, Spain

Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic

Cabezón de la Sal, Spain
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Escobar S.,Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic | Escobar S.,University of Chile | Rocha A.,Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic | Felip A.,Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic | And 5 more authors.
General and Comparative Endocrinology | Year: 2016

In this study, we report the cloning of three transcripts for leptin receptor in the European sea bass, a marine teleost of economic interest. The two shortest variants, generated by different splice sites, encode all functional extracellular and intracellular domains but missed the transmembrane domain. The resulting proteins are therefore potential soluble binding proteins for leptin. The longest transcript (3605 bp), termed sblepr, includes all the essential domains for binding and transduction of the signal. Thus, it is proposed as the ortholog for the human LEPR gene, the main responsible for leptin signaling. Phylogenetic analysis shows the sblepr clustered within the teleost leptin receptor group in 100% of the bootstrap replicates. The neuroanatomical localization of sblepr expressing cells has been assessed by in situ hybridization in brains of sea bass of both sexes during their first sexual maturation. At histological level, the distribution pattern of sblepr expressing cells in the brain shows no clear differences regarding sex or reproductive season. Transcripts of the sblepr have a widespread distribution throughout the forebrain and midbrain until the caudal portion of the hypothalamus. A high hybridization signal is detected in the telencephalon, preoptic area, medial basal and caudal hypothalamus and in the pituitary gland. In a more caudal region, sblepr expressing cells are identified in the longitudinal torus. The expression pattern observed for sblepr suggests that in sea bass, leptin is very likely to be involved in the control of food intake, energy reserves and reproduction. © 2016 Elsevier Inc..


PubMed | University of Rennes 1 and Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic
Type: | Journal: General and comparative endocrinology | Year: 2016

In this study, we report the cloning of three transcripts for leptin receptor in the European sea bass, a marine teleost of economic interest. The two shortest variants, generated by different splice sites, encode all functional extracellular and intracellular domains but missed the transmembrane domain. The resulting proteins are therefore potential soluble binding proteins for leptin. The longest transcript (3605bp), termed sblepr, includes all the essential domains for binding and transduction of the signal. Thus, it is proposed as the ortholog for the human LEPR gene, the main responsible for leptin signaling. Phylogenetic analysis shows the sblepr clustered within the teleost leptin receptor group in 100% of the bootstrap replicates. The neuroanatomical localization of sblepr expressing cells has been assessed by in situ hybridization in brains of sea bass of both sexes during their first sexual maturation. At histological level, the distribution pattern of sblepr expressing cells in the brain shows no clear differences regarding sex or reproductive season. Transcripts of the sblepr have a widespread distribution throughout the forebrain and midbrain until the caudal portion of the hypothalamus. A high hybridization signal is detected in the telencephalon, preoptic area, medial basal and caudal hypothalamus and in the pituitary gland. In a more caudal region, sblepr expressing cells are identified in the longitudinal torus. The expression pattern observed for sblepr suggests that in sea bass, leptin is very likely to be involved in the control of food intake, energy reserves and reproduction.


Mazon M.J.,Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic | Moles G.,Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic | Rocha A.,Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic | Crespo B.,Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic | And 7 more authors.
General and Comparative Endocrinology | Year: 2015

Follicle stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are central endocrine regulators of the gonadal function in vertebrates. They act through specific receptors located in certain cell types found in the gonads. In fish, the differential roles of these hormones are being progressively elucidated due to the development of suitable tools for their study. In European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), isolation of the genes coding for the gonadotropin subunits and receptors allowed in first instance to conduct expression studies. Later, to overcome the limitation of using native hormones, recombinant dimeric gonadotropins, which show different functional characteristics depending on the cell system and DNA construct, were generated. In addition, single gonadotropin beta-subunits have been produced and used as antigens for antibody production. This approach has allowed the development of detection methods for native gonadotropins, with European sea bass being one of the few species where both gonadotropins can be detected in their native form.By administering recombinant gonadotropins to gonad tissues in vitro, we were able to study their effects on steroidogenesis and intracellular pathways. Their administration in vivo has also been tested for use in basic studies and as a biotechnological approach for hormone therapy and assisted reproduction strategies. In addition to the production of recombinant hormones, gene-based therapies using somatic gene transfer have been offered as an alternative. This approach has been tested in sea bass for gonadotropin delivery in vivo. The hormones produced by the genes injected were functional and have allowed studies on the action of gonadotropins in spermatogenesis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Institute Acuicultura Of Torre La Sal Csic
Type: | Journal: General and comparative endocrinology | Year: 2015

Follicle stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are central endocrine regulators of the gonadal function in vertebrates. They act through specific receptors located in certain cell types found in the gonads. In fish, the differential roles of these hormones are being progressively elucidated due to the development of suitable tools for their study. In European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), isolation of the genes coding for the gonadotropin subunits and receptors allowed in first instance to conduct expression studies. Later, to overcome the limitation of using native hormones, recombinant dimeric gonadotropins, which show different functional characteristics depending on the cell system and DNA construct, were generated. In addition, single gonadotropin beta-subunits have been produced and used as antigens for antibody production. This approach has allowed the development of detection methods for native gonadotropins, with European sea bass being one of the few species where both gonadotropins can be detected in their native form. By administering recombinant gonadotropins to gonad tissues in vitro, we were able to study their effects on steroidogenesis and intracellular pathways. Their administration in vivo has also been tested for use in basic studies and as a biotechnological approach for hormone therapy and assisted reproduction strategies. In addition to the production of recombinant hormones, gene-based therapies using somatic gene transfer have been offered as an alternative. This approach has been tested in sea bass for gonadotropin delivery in vivo. The hormones produced by the genes injected were functional and have allowed studies on the action of gonadotropins in spermatogenesis.

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