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However, not all intercultural experiences have the same effect on creativity and innovation. "People who had deep connections with someone from another culture experience growth in creativity—but this creative boost does not occur when people only have shallow connections with people from other cultures," says Adam Galinsky, Chair of the Management Division at Columbia Business School.  "For example, we have consistently found that people who have lived abroad have an increase in creativity, but that travel abroad has very little effect.  The deeper your connection, the deeper your understanding of this other culture, and the more creative you're going to become." The researchers conclude that individuals looking to improve their creativity should actively seek opportunities that allow them to "step outside [of] their cultural comfort zone," such as organizing a language exchange program.  They also suggest that companies have the opportunity to enhance creativity across their organizations by embracing the diversity of their workforce. The research, "Going Out" of the Box: Close Intercultural Friendships and Romantic Relationships Spark Creativity, Workplace Innovation, and Entrepreneurship, is soon to be published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.  It was authored by Columbia's Galinsky and INSEAD's Maddux, in conjunction with lead author Jackson Lu, a PhD student at Columbia Business School, Andrew Hafenbrack of Católica-Lisbon School of Business and Economics, Paul Eastwick of UC-Davis, and Dan Wang of Columbia Business School. Behind the Research Findings The authors conducted several field studies to develop their findings. In one study researchers looked at the dating histories of individuals after they had completed creativity tests.  They then compared their test scores to the dating histories and discovered that those with extended intercultural romantic relationships performed well on the tests.  Interestingly, they found that the length of the relationship was a far greater influencer on creativity than the number of intercultural relationships a person has. In another study, more than 100 MBA students representing 39 nationalities were given creative tests at the beginning and end of their MBA program.  Students who indicated that they had been romantically involved with someone from another culture during their 10-month program displayed higher creative performance on the tests. A final study sought to identify the impact that intercultural friendship – as opposed to intercultural romantic relationships – has on creative enhancement.  The researchers solicited information from more than 2,000 global professionals who had previously (but no longer) worked in the United States, specifically asking participants about professional accomplishments as well as if they continued to maintain close relationships with friends from the U.S.  Professionals who indicated that they maintained close relationships with friends from the U.S. were more likely to have greater creative accomplishments than those who did not maintain close relationships, as measured by the number of professionals who either started their own businesses or produced new innovations within their companies. To learn more about the research, as well as other cutting-edge findings from leading business school academics, please visit gsb.columbia.edu or knowledge.insead.edu. About Columbia Business School Columbia Business School is the only world–class, Ivy League business school that delivers a learning experience where academic excellence meets with real–time exposure to the pulse of global business. Led by Dean Glenn Hubbard, the School's transformative curriculum bridges academic theory with unparalleled exposure to real–world business practice, equipping students with an entrepreneurial mindset that allows them to recognize, capture, and create opportunity in any business environment. The thought leadership of the School's faculty and staff, combined with the accomplishments of its distinguished alumni and position in the center of global business, means that the School's efforts have an immediate, measurable impact on the forces shaping business every day. To learn more about Columbia Business School's position at the very center of business, please visit www.gsb.columbia.edu. About INSEAD As one of the world's leading and largest graduate business schools, INSEAD offers participants a truly global educational experience. With campuses in Europe (France), Asia (Singapore) and Middle East (Abu Dhabi), INSEAD's business education and research spans three continents. Our 145 renowned faculty members from 40 countries inspire more than 1,400 students in our degree and PhD programmes. In addition, more than 11,000 executives participate in INSEAD's executive education programmes each year. INSEAD's MBA programme is ranked #1 by the Financial Times in 2016 and 2017. More information about INSEAD can be found at www.insead.edu. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-research-shows-that-close-intercultural-relationships-can-enhance-individual-creativity-and-innovation-potential-300481528.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Norwich-based Broadland Housing Group is delighted to announce four new appointments to its board. -- Siobhan Trice and Samantha England join as tenant board members, while Chris Ewbank and Dr Simon Hibberd join as independents. All four have been co-opted onto the Board and will face formal election by shareholders at the AGM in September.Chris Ewbank will, subject to election by shareholders, succeed Jenny Manser as Chair in the autumn. Jenny has been interim Chair since last summer, when Alison Inman, who was elected Chair in 2015, had to resign from the Board due to ill health.  Jenny is planning to retire from the Board at the 2017 AGM after 9 years of service to the Group.is the Chief Financial Officer/Senior Bursar of St John's College, Cambridge, responsible for the college's £525 million endowment, human resources, strategic planning, governance, regulatory compliance and fundraising. Before joining St John's in 2005, Chris was Chief Operating Officer of Rothschild's Asian Investment banking in Hong Kong, having joined Rothschild in 2000. Previously, he was an investment banker for Schroders in London, Singapore and New York. Chris qualified as a solicitor in 1988 and holds an MBA from INSEAD.worked as GP in Norfolk for almost 30 years, retiring earlier this year. As Senior Partner of his practice, Simon championed collaborative working across local health and social services; established the innovative social enterprise Breckland Care at Home, which provides almost 700 hours of personal care each week; and worked closely with the South Norfolk Clinical Commissioning Group.is a Health and Social Care Assessor for NVQs at Babington Business College, Derby. She has spent most of her career in the field of health and social care, including roles as Service Manager for Leaf Care Services and Training Adviser for the YMCA. She is a member of her local Patient and Participant Group (PPG) and the Independent Advisory Group (IAG) for Norfolk Constabularyis the Business Officer for a local ecological consultancy, responsible for the organisation's general office management and financial reporting. She was previously Business Development Manager for Loddon Equestrian and Adnams plc. She has also worked as a Distillery Tour Guide and Contact Centre Coordinator for Adnams.Michael Newey, Group Chief Executive, commented: "We are delighted to welcome four new members to the Board. They bring with them diverse skills and experience that will further strengthen our governance and strategic planning. Siobhan and Sam will help us maintain our emphasis on ensuring that our services are fit for purpose for our residents; Simon will strengthen our focus on joining up housing with health and social care; while Chris not only brings his considerable chairing skills, but also his understanding and experience of funding markets at a time when we know we have to raise more debt to meet our ambition to grow our housing stock by 3% per annum. The Board and executive are looking forward to working with all four new members over the years ahead."


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Consumers are raving about the AVOCADO service. A recent thank you gift to AVOCADO team reads "we have two young kids but still we would end up eating out often. Now groceries are always stocked so we cook at home regularly and eat healthier." AVOCADO prides itself in the way it treats its customers. "Our philosophy is to focus on providing value to customers and everything else will figure itself out. An above-board customer service is part of our value proposition. We ensure 1 hr resolution for the majority of customer issues. This results in happy customers and a lot of referrals," said Pradyumna Gupta, Founder at AVOCADO. "Pie is a huge step in grocery shopping automation. It is the only device of its kind and it creates unprecedented value for our customers," said Srikanth Kakani, Founder - CEO at AVOCADO. AVOCADO market study shows that about 57% of the consumers consider grocery shopping a chore and would love to see it automated. AVOCADO helps them do it. AVOCADO is on a mission to automate mindless recurring chores at home. AVOCADO team has graduates from Stanford, Harvard, INSEAD, Georgia tech and IIT with more than 100 years of collective hardware building experience and track record of turning startups profitable. Team AVOCADO takes pride in seamlessly combining advanced technology with boots-in-the-mud practicality to build systems that are innovative, cool and actually work. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hate-grocery-shopping-this-is-how-avocados-pie-will-fix-it-300454559.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

HUNTSVILLE, Ala.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--ADTRAN®, Inc., (NASDAQ: ADTN), a leading provider of next-generation open networking solutions, today announced that the Board of Directors has appointed Gregory McCray, CEO of Alphabet’s Access Company, the Alphabet subsidiary that oversees Google Fiber, as a director. Mr. McCray’s extensive background in driving the connected future will be a tremendous asset to ADTRAN’s Board as the company continues to focus on expanding Gigabit broadband speeds to support the broader demands of smart cities, the Internet of Things and software-defined networking. “Over the past decade, the telecommunications market has undergone several fundamental shifts in terms of how networks are designed, services are developed and what types of organizations deliver those services. Greg brings tremendous management and international experience that will greatly benefit our team as we look to leverage these shifts to create shareholder and organizational value,” said Thomas Stanton, chairman and CEO of ADTRAN. “The pace of change in our industry has accelerated, requiring more nimble and flexible approaches as we continue to drive innovation, expand our reach and transform the way people live, work and play. I believe that this is a perfect time for someone of Greg’s vision and experience to join our board.” Mr. McCray is an experienced executive with 30 years of business, marketing, sales, engineering, operations, M&A, management and international experience in the communications technology industry. As CEO of Access, he is leading the company’s efforts to deliver 1Gbps internet, TV and phone service in several markets across the United States. Prior to this, Greg served in various other roles including chief executive officer of Aero Communications Inc., which provides installation, services and support to the Communications Industry; chairman and CEO of PipingHot Networks, which brought broadband fixed wireless access equipment to market; senior VP of customer operations at Lucent Technologies where he managed the Customer Technical Operations Group for Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA); and a member of the Board of Directors at CenturyLink, Inc. (NYSE: CTL), the third largest network operator in America, where he was chairman of the Cyber Security & Risk Committee, member of the Compensation Committee and the Nominating & Corporate Governance Committee. McCray holds a B.S. in Computer Engineering from Iowa State University, an M.S. in Industrial & Systems Engineering from Purdue University and Executive Business Programs at the University of Illinois, Harvard and INSEAD. ADTRAN, Inc. is a leading global provider of networking and communications equipment. ADTRAN’s products enable voice, data, video and Internet communications across a variety of network infrastructures. ADTRAN solutions are currently in use by service providers, private enterprises, government organizations, and millions of individual users worldwide. For more information, please visit www.adtran.com.


Shahani will moderate the panel which will focus on value creation. Joining Shahani in the panel will be Paul Skipworth, Partner at Inverleith, LLP; Harry Dolman, Partner and COO of HPE Growth Capital; Monique Cohen, Partner at Apax Partners; and Andrew Priest, Director at Inflexion Private Equity Partners, LLP. "I am delighted to be moderating this panel on value creation," said Shahani. "Blue Ridge's specialization in revenue growth, the primary driver of value creation, gives us a strong perspective on the issues and opportunities. We have an excellent group of panelists drawn from successful firms with varied and distinctive approaches to value creation across some of the largest European PE markets. It will be a lively, interesting and well-informed discussion." Shahani has more than 25 years' experience of driving value-creating growth. Before joining Blue Ridge Partners as Managing Director, he trained at McKinsey, founded one of the UK's earliest digital marketing consultancies, served as a strategy VP with American Express dealing with all non-US markets and consulted independently on growth to a large number of UK and global clients. He holds an MA in Economics from Kings College, Cambridge, England, and an MBA with Distinction from INSEAD, France. INSEAD, known as the "business school for the world," is the world's largest graduate business school with campuses in Europe, Asia and the Middle East. The MBA program has recently been ranked #1 in the world by the Financial Times. The event will begin at 8:30 A.M. CET and will be held at INSEAD's European Campus in Fontainebleau. Blue Ridge Partners is a management consulting firm exclusively focused on helping companies accelerate profitable revenue growth. We have worked with more than 400 middle market and large cap clients to improve their strategic understanding of markets and customers, deepen and expand their customer relationships and enhance marketing and sales performance. Our clients include over 100 private equity firms and their portfolio companies – both during deal evaluation/ due diligence and post-acquisition. We have a reputation for helping companies grow faster by rolling up our sleeves, working collaboratively and delivering measurable impact quickly, and more efficiently, than large consultancies.  For more information, visit http://www.blueridgepartners.com.


"I am delighted to be moderating this panel on value creation," said Shahani. "Blue Ridge's specialization in revenue growth, the primary driver of value creation, gives us a strong perspective on the issues and opportunities. We have an excellent group of panelists drawn from successful firms with varied and distinctive approaches to value creation across some of the largest European PE markets. It will be a lively, interesting and well-informed discussion." Shahani has more than 25 years' experience of driving value-creating growth. Before joining Blue Ridge Partners as Managing Director, he trained at McKinsey, founded one of the UK's earliest digital marketing consultancies, served as a strategy VP with American Express dealing with all non-US markets and consulted independently on growth to a large number of UK and global clients. He holds an MA in Economics from Kings College, Cambridge, England, and an MBA with Distinction from INSEAD, France. INSEAD, known as the "business school for the world," is the world's largest graduate business school with campuses in Europe, Asia and the Middle East. The MBA program has recently been ranked #1 in the world by the Financial Times. The event will begin at 8:30 A.M. CET and will be held at INSEAD's European Campus in Fontainebleau. Blue Ridge Partners is a management consulting firm exclusively focused on helping companies accelerate profitable revenue growth. We have worked with more than 400 middle market and large cap clients to improve their strategic understanding of markets and customers, deepen and expand their customer relationships and enhance marketing and sales performance. Our clients include over 100 private equity firms and their portfolio companies – both during deal evaluation/ due diligence and post-acquisition. We have a reputation for helping companies grow faster by rolling up our sleeves, working collaboratively and delivering measurable impact quickly, and more efficiently, than large consultancies.  For more information, visit http://www.blueridgepartners.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/moti-shahani-of-blue-ridge-partners-to-moderate-value-creation-panel-at-insead-private-equity-conference-in-fontainebleau-france-300455734.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Young men believe they are more drunk than they really are when they think their liquor is mixed with an energy drink. Energy drinks adverts high on risk taking and a lack of inhibition, profoundly influence the way young people believe they are intoxicated when they are mixing them with alcohol. When told an energy drink is mixed in their vodka cocktails, young men feel more intoxicated, daring, and sexually self-confident, new research suggests. The effects of intoxication were stronger in those who believe that energy drinks boost the effect of liquor. Previous studies suggested that mixing energy drinks with alcohol could mask the effects of liquor, leading consumers to believe they weren't drunk but, in a trial of 154 young men at the Paris-based INSEAD Sorbonne University Behavioral Lab, the opposite was found to be true. The study participants were told they would drink a cocktail of an energy drink, vodka and fruit juice. Although all drinks had the same ingredients, they had different labels: Red Bull & vodka, a vodka cocktail or a fruit juice cocktail. The effect of the label alone on participants' self-assessment of intoxication was remarkable. Researchers found that participants who believed they were drinking an energy drink and alcohol cocktail were more likely to believe themselves quite drunk and uninhibited. This was especially true among those who had a strong belief that mixing energy drinks with liquor would boost the effects of liquor. Labeling the same cocktail as vodka & Red Bull increased perceived intoxication by 51%, compared to labelling it a vodka cocktail or a fruit juice cocktail. It also increased the young men's intentions to approach and "chat up" women, and their confidence that they would welcome it. Finally, it led also to more risk-taking in a gambling game. All these effects were stronger for the participants who most strongly believed that energy drinks boost the effects of alcohol and that being intoxicated reduces inhibitions and increases risk-taking. On the positive side, the authors found that the Red Bull & vodka label increased intentions to wait before getting behind the wheel of a car by 14 minutes because of the perceived intoxication. Yann Cornil, Assistant Professor of the Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, Pierre Chandon, the L'Oréal Chaired Professor of Marketing, Innovation and Creativity at INSEAD, and Aradhna Krishna, the Dwight F. Benton Professor of Marketing at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business, published the results of their study in paper "Does Red Bull Give Wings to Vodka? Placebo Effects of Marketing Labels on Perceived Intoxication and Risky Attitudes and Behaviors", forthcoming in the Journal of Consumer Psychology. "Red Bull has long used the slogan 'Red Bull gives you wings,' but our study shows that this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn't," said lead author Cornil. "Essentially, when alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel like they're more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way." Labelling functions as a "placebo" in this study. People read "placebo" and see "fake" but the marketing placebo effect is a real psychological effect in which a brand influences consumers' expectations and, as a result, their behavior. This study shows for the first time that there is a causal effect of mixing alcohol and energy drinks on perceived intoxication and real behaviors driven by the expectation that energy drinks boost the effects of alcohol, rather than the contents of the cocktails. All participants had the same drink yet their belief about what they were drinking had an impact on their behavior. "Beliefs that people have about a product can be just as important as the ingredients of the product itself," said Chandon, co-author and director of the INSEAD Sorbonne Behavioral Lab. "Regulations and codes of conduct should consider the psychological--and not just physiological--effects of products." According to the researchers, the findings highlight a need for policymakers and consumer protection groups to re-examine how energy drinks are advertised and labelled. "Given the psychological effects of energy-drink marketing, energy drink marketers should be banned from touting the disinhibiting effects of their ingredients," said Cornil. "The silver lining was that emphasizing the energy drink in the cocktail made the participants less likely to drive," said study co-author Krishna. "It seems that drunk-driving education is working enough to make people think hard about driving when they are feeling drunk." This article has implications for consumers of energy drinks and alcohol, government regulators, and those who market new products which could be pitched in way that encourages reckless behavior. As one of the world's leading and largest graduate business schools, INSEAD offers participants a truly global educational experience. With campuses in Europe (France), Asia (Singapore) and Middle East (Abu Dhabi), INSEAD's business education and research spans three continents. Our 145 renowned faculty members from 40 countries inspire more than 1,400 students in our degree and PhD programmes. In addition, more than 11,000 executives participate in INSEAD's executive education programmes each year. INSEAD's MBA programme is ranked #1 by the Financial Times in 2016 and 2017.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New research suggests that simply telling a young man that an energy drink has been added to his alcoholic beverage can make him feel more intoxicated, daring and sexually self-confident. The study, led by the UBC Sauder School of Business, is the first to examine the effect of marketing on consumer beliefs related to alcohol mixed with energy drinks. "Red Bull has long used the slogan 'Red Bull gives you wings,' but our study shows that this type of advertising can make people think it has intoxicating qualities when it doesn't," said Yann Cornil, the study's lead author and assistant professor at UBC Sauder. "When alcohol is mixed with an energy drink and people are aware of it, they feel like they're more intoxicated simply because the marketing says they should feel that way." While earlier studies suggested that mixing energy drinks and alcohol could be dangerous, recent experiments in which people were not told what they were drinking found that adding energy drinks to alcohol had no effect on actual or perceived intoxication and was unlikely to increase alcohol's effect on behaviour. Despite this, those who knowingly mix energy drinks with alcohol have twice the risk of experiencing or committing sexual assault or being involved in a car crash, compared to people who drink alcohol straight. To test their theory that the marketing of energy drinks could result in a placebo effect, the researchers recruited 154 young men who were each given a cocktail containing vodka, Red Bull and fruit juice. The labelling of the cocktail either emphasized the presence of the energy drink, describing it as a "vodka-Red Bull cocktail," or not, describing it as a "vodka cocktail" or "exotic cocktail." Participants were then asked to complete a series of tasks on a computer to measure their perceived drunkenness and their attitudes and behaviors. The researchers found that emphasizing the presence of an energy drink significantly increased perceived intoxication, risk-taking and sexual self-confidence, especially among participants who already had a strong belief that mixing energy drinks with alcohol would have this effect. The researchers also measured how likely participants were to drive, and found that emphasizing the energy drink decreased participants' intentions to drive under the influence. "The silver lining was that emphasizing the energy drink in the cocktail made the participants less likely to drive," said study co-author Aradhna Krishna, marketing professor at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business. "It seems that drunk-driving education is working enough to make people think hard about driving when they are feeling drunk." "Given the study's findings about the psychological effects of energy-drink marketing, energy drink marketers should be banned from touting the disinhibiting effects of their ingredients," said co-author Pierre Chandon, marketing professor at INSEAD business school. "Regulations and codes of conduct should consider the psychological - and not just the physiological - effects of products." The study, "Does Red Bull Give Wings to Vodka? Placebo Effects of Marketing Labels on Perceived Intoxication and Risky Attitudes and Behaviours," was recently published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology.


Adam H.,INSEAD
Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS | Year: 2010

The current research is the first investigation of how the effects of expressing discrete emotions in negotiations vary across cultures. In a hypothetical negotiation scenario (Study 1) and a computer-mediated negotiation simulation (Study 2), expressing anger (relative to not expressing anger) elicited larger concessions from European American negotiators, but smaller concessions from Asian and Asian American negotiators. A third study provided evidence that this effect is due to different cultural norms about the appropriateness of anger expressions in negotiations: When we explicitly manipulated anger expressions to be appropriate, Asian and Asian American negotiators made larger concessions to the angry opponent, and their concessions were as large as was typical for European American negotiators; when we explicitly manipulated anger expressions to be inappropriate, European American negotiators made smaller concessions to the angry opponent, and their concessions were as small as was typical for Asian and Asian American negotiators. Implications for current understanding of culture, emotions, and negotiations are discussed.


Chandon P.,INSEAD
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy | Year: 2013

Because packaging reaches consumers at the critical moments of purchase and consumption, it has become an important marketing tool for food manufacturers and retailers. In this paper, I first review how the marketing, health and nutrition claims made on packaging create "health halos" that make foods appear healthier than they are, thereby leading to higher consumption yet lower perceived calorie intake. I then show how packaging design (cues, shapes, and sizes) biases people's perception of quantity and increases their preference for supersized packages and portions that appear smaller than they are. Finally, I examine the extent to which mandatory nutrition labels, stricter regulation of package claims, public promotion of mindful eating, and mindless eating nudges could limit the biasing effects of packaging on food perceptions and preferences. © The Author(s) 2012. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. All rights reserved.

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