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Patent
Inscent, Inc | Date: 2014-05-03

The present specification discloses honeybee repellents exhibiting repellent properties similar to 2-heptanone, compositions comprising such repellents, uses to repel a honeybee from a mammal, location, plant, structure treated of such repellents, and methods of treating a mammal, location, plant, structure by applying such repellents.


Patent
Inscent, Inc | Date: 2014-05-03

The present specification discloses honeybee repellents exhibiting repellent properties similar to 2-heptanone, compositions comprising such repellents, uses to repel a honeybee from a mammal, location, plant, structure treated of such repellents, and methods of treating a mammal, location, plant, structure by applying such repellents.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 500.00K | Year: 2015

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is providing better attractants for the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri. The attractants can be combined with control products such as Spinosad to generate improved bait-and-kill stations. D. citri vectors greening disease and is the most serious pest faced by the US citrus industry. The psyllid has severely affected Florida citrus production, and has spread to Texas and California, where citrus is a billion-dollar industry with a history dating back to the 19th century. However, current control approaches lack effective attractants for use in bait-and-kill stations and traps. The approach described uses rational design to isolate compounds that bind to critical psyllid chemosensory proteins, and then identifies thosecompounds capable of attracting psyllids. These novel attractants can then be incorporated into bait-and-kill stations containing a control product such as Spinosad. This project incorporates several innovative platform technologies comprising a high throughput assay system for rapidly identifying molecules that interact with insect chemosensory proteins. The project also involves the development of a novel bait-and-kill station intended specifically to attract D. citri to a control agent capable of limiting psyllid populations.The broader impacts of this project are platform technologies applicable to the development of control products for insect pest species of economic, agricultural, or medicinal significance. A bait-and-kill station enhanced with a highly efficient attractant will provide crucial psyllid population control, and no commercial psyllid attractant currently exists. There is thus a serious need by the US citrus industry for such a product.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.90K | Year: 2014

Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP) vectors citrus greening disease and is thus the most serious pest faced by the US citrus industry. The ACP has already severely affected Florida citrus production, has entered Texas, and is spreading into California, where citrus is a billion-dollar industry with a history dating back to the 19th century. However, current control approaches lack effective attractants for use in bait-and-kill stations and traps. The approach described uses rational design to isolate compounds that bind to critical ACP chemosensory proteins, and then identifies those compounds capable of attracting ACP. These novel attractants can then be incorporated into bait-and-kill stations containing a control product such as Spinosad. This project incorporates several novel platform technologies comprising a high throughput assay system for rapidly identifying molecules that interact with insect chemosensory proteins.


Patent
Inscent, Inc | Date: 2016-08-01

The present specification discloses honeybee repellents exhibiting repellent properties similar to 2-heptanone, compositions comprising such repellents, uses to repel a honeybee from a mammal, location, plant, structure treated of such repellents, and methods of treating a mammal, location, plant, structure by applying such repellents.


Patent
Inscent, Inc | Date: 2016-05-16

The present specification discloses honeybee repellents exhibiting repellent properties similar to 2-heptanone, compositions comprising such repellents, uses to repel a honeybee from a mammal, location, plant, structure treated of such repellents, and methods of treating a mammal, location, plant, structure by applying such repellents.


Patent
Inscent, Inc | Date: 2016-05-16

The present specification discloses honeybee repellents exhibiting repellent properties similar to 2-heptanone, compositions comprising such repellents, uses to repel a honeybee from a mammal, location, plant, structure treated of such repellents, and methods of treating a mammal, location, plant, structure by applying such repellents.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project proposes to develop novel attractants for the spotted wing fruit fly, Drosophila suzukii. D. suzukii is an invasive insect pest endemic to South East Asia that targets a variety of economically important soft-fruit crops, thus posing a serious threat to US agriculture. The pests range is rapidly expanding and traditional control methods, such as pesticide treatment, are problematic. An effective bait-and-kill device would offer specific advantages by avoiding the wide dispersal of broad-range insecticides and protecting the environment, beneficial species, and organic farms in the area. However, this device depends on the availability of effective attractants, the focus of this proposal. This project incorporates several novel platform technologies comprising a high throughput assay system for rapidly identifying molecules that interact with insect chemosensory proteins. These molecules have the potential to affect D. suzukii behavior, and, once identified, they will be subsequently evaluated for behavioral effects on living flies. Thus, the project will result in lead molecules for a next-generation, effective D. suzukii attractant formulation useful in trapping and population control.


The broader impact/commercial potential of this project, if successful, will be the development of a platform technology applicable to rapidly generating novel control products for insect pest species of economic, agricultural, or medicinal significance. No specific D. suzukii attractant currently exists; bait-and-kill devices for D. suzukii would allow a shift away from the widespread spraying of insecticides to a more targeted, responsible control methodology utilizing efficient bait-and-kill stations. A device utilizing an effective attractant would benefit the US agriculture industry since it would allow safe and effective D. suzukii control. Moreover, the platform technologies utilized herein have broader commercial impacts, as they are directly applicable to the control of other insect pest species.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will be a significant improvement in the control of dangerous mosquitoes that transmit serious diseases to humans, including Zika fever, malaria, encephalitis, chikungunya, and dengue fever. This project will generate a novel larvicide directed against the larvae of harmful mosquitoes that live in water. The larvicide is combined with an efficient lure to generate effective bait-and-kill stations that will target only harmful mosquito species. An efficient, inexpensive, safe product to kill mosquito larvae will improve public health since it will greatly reduce the number of adult mosquitoes capable of infecting humans with diseases. The product will protect non-target species and will not contaminate the water with toxins. This project incorporates several new technologies that are also applicable to the future control of other insect pest species, including a novel design system to produce lures that attract mosquito larvae to bait stations, a new method to kill insect larvae while leaving other species unharmed, and a new method to package the control product. The product and the methods discussed are new, address unmet health and safety needs in several countries, and are expected to have widespread market appeal.

The technical objectives in this Phase I research project are focused on providing novel attractants for the aquatic larvae of Aedes aegypti and other harmful mosquitos, and combining these lures with a novel larvicide that will eradicate the targeted larvae without contaminating the water column with insecticide or harming non-target species. The mosquito?s range is expanding and traditional control methods are becoming problematic. An effective bait-and-kill device would avoid the wide dispersal of broad-range insecticides and protect the environment, beneficial species, and humans. However, this device requires an efficient attractant to selectively lure mosquito larvae and an effectual, yet selective, larvicide that will not harm non-target species or contaminate the water. These are therefore the foci of this project. This project incorporates several novel approaches to develop a microencapsulated nanoparticle that will function as a targeted larvicide. To achieve the stated goals, compounds that strongly attract mosquito larvae will be combined with a nonpoisonous polymer larvicide that is active only uponingestion by the larvae. The anticipated end product is a bait-and-kill device for A. aegypti larvae that would allow a shift away from broad-spectrum insecticides to a more targeted, responsible control methodology. The platform technologies are applicable to other species in the future.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will be a significant improvement in the control of dangerous mosquitoes that transmit serious diseases to humans, including Zika fever, malaria, encephalitis, chikungunya, and dengue fever. This project will generate a novel larvicide directed against the larvae of harmful mosquitoes that live in water. The larvicide is combined with an efficient lure to generate effective bait-and-kill stations that will target only harmful mosquito species. An efficient, inexpensive, safe product to kill mosquito larvae will improve public health since it will greatly reduce the number of adult mosquitoes capable of infecting humans with diseases. The product will protect non-target species and will not contaminate the water with toxins. This project incorporates several new technologies that are also applicable to the future control of other insect pest species, including a novel design system to produce lures that attract mosquito larvae to bait stations, a new method to kill insect larvae while leaving other species unharmed, and a new method to package the control product. The product and the methods discussed are new, address unmet health and safety needs in several countries, and are expected to have widespread market appeal. The technical objectives in this Phase I research project are focused on providing novel attractants for the aquatic larvae of Aedes aegypti and other harmful mosquitos, and combining these lures with a novel larvicide that will eradicate the targeted larvae without contaminating the water column with insecticide or harming non-target species. The mosquito?s range is expanding and traditional control methods are becoming problematic. An effective bait-and-kill device would avoid the wide dispersal of broad-range insecticides and protect the environment, beneficial species, and humans. However, this device requires an efficient attractant to selectively lure mosquito larvae and an effectual, yet selective, larvicide that will not harm non-target species or contaminate the water. These are therefore the foci of this project. This project incorporates several novel approaches to develop a microencapsulated nanoparticle that will function as a targeted larvicide. To achieve the stated goals, compounds that strongly attract mosquito larvae will be combined with a nonpoisonous polymer larvicide that is active only uponingestion by the larvae. The anticipated end product is a bait-and-kill device for A. aegypti larvae that would allow a shift away from broad-spectrum insecticides to a more targeted, responsible control methodology. The platform technologies are applicable to other species in the future.

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