Chesterfield, MO, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: The objective of the Phase II effort is to extend the mathematical model investigated in the Phase I to include wind speed as well as temperature modeling, continue its development for a University of Notre Dame Wind Tunnel Facility, and demonstrate utility by adopting the model to a government facility specified by AFOSR. Specifically, the Phase II will include developmental work in making measurements, development of the mathematical model, neural network methods for organizing databases of facility performance, error-management methods, and demonstration of control for both fast and slow processes such as wind tunnel speed and temperature, respectively. BENEFIT: The result of this STTR program will allow improved control and utilization of wind tunnel facilities. The program also offers information that can improve the safety of operating wind tunnel facilities. Finally, for large scale facilities, this program may reduce staffing requirements and thereby costs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 709.34K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: Under this Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, Innovative Technology Applications Company (ITAC), LLC and the University of Notre Dame (UND) are working to develop new optical instruments that will enable nonintrusive, off-body measurements of flow parameters in hypersonic flight. The two concepts under development by the ITAC/UND team and described in this proposal involve, first, the employment of a thermal-tufting technique for real-time determination of three-dimensional velocity components, and second, the use of innovative aero-optic techniques for determining spatially-resolved fluctuating flow properties. The thermal-tufting technique will be designed to be packaged and implemented in the form of an air-data probe that would provide measurements of 3-components of velocity, angle of attack, sideslip angle, and Mach number, and which would most likely be placed near the vehicle nose where the shock is expected to be relatively steady owing to laminar flow in the initial leading-edge boundary layer. The aero-optic instrument will consist of a wavefront sensor and other optical components that will most likely be situated further downstream on the test vehicle, and designed to determine flow transition and turbulence in the vehicle boundary layer. BENEFIT: The proposed instruments will provide capabilities of real-time determination of three-dimensional velocity components and other spatially-resolved fluctuating flow properties which will lead to improved understanding of high-speed flows around hypersonic vehicles. This kind of fluid-mechanic understanding cannot be obtained from ground-test and CFD efforts alone, since ground-test facilities are not capable of achieving all points in the flight envelope of realistic vehicle designs, while CFD results require validation data. The proposed non-intrusive, optical instruments will aid in the design and development of safer and more reliable systems, and will be suited for the flight-test environment where space and installation options are limited.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.89K | Year: 2016

This Phase II SBIR project deals with advancing the design, development, and testing of an innovative drag reduction concept named ?Smart Longitudinal Instability Prevention via Plasma Surface? using a new revolutionary plasma actuator technology developed at the University of Notre Dame (UND). During Phase I, Innovative Technology Applications Company (ITAC), LLC and researchers from UND developed and demonstrated drag reduction of more than 65% in turbulent boundary layers using the SLIPPS approach. This approach intervenes in the Streak Transient Growth Instability mechanism which is a dominant mechanism in the production of drag in turbulent boundary layer flows. In Phase II, we will investigate and test the use of SLIPPS concept at both higher Mach number and Reynolds number flows, as well as build an improved understanding of the physics in order to make even further efficiency gains possible. Phase III will advance the TRL to a level suitable for flight tests and integration into production systems.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2013

A major component of airframe noise for commercial transport aircraft is the deployed landing gear. The noise from the gear originates due to complex, unsteady bluff body flow separation from gear components and the subsequent multiple interactions of unsteady wakes with downstream undercarriage elements. The object of this SBIR effort is to develop and advance a novel 'plasma fairing' technology for quieting landing gear noise. The concept deals with the use of single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators to reduce noise associated with bluff body separation around the gear. SDBD plasma actuators will be employed either in the form of spanwise-orientated actuators or plasma streamwise vortex generators (PSVGs) to suppress surface pressure fluctuations, and consequently flow-induced noise, on a representative landing gear model. Our Phase I effort will involve a combination of numerical and experimental studies to be conducted at Innovative Technology Applications Company, LLC and the University of Notre Dame, respectively, in order to advance the design and optimization of 'plasma fairings' from a simple geometry (tandem circular cylinder) to a more complex/realistic landing gear geometry (e.g., the Gulfstream G550 nose gear). A combination of DES numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments is expected to provide a clear demonstration of the plasma fairing performance for noise reduction, while providing a clear path forward for Phase II.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2013

In this program, Innovative Technology Applications Company (ITAC), LLC and collaborators propose to advance "synthetic phased array" technology to improve understanding of noise from landing gear. The technology, initially developed in a previous NASA SBIR project for trailing edge noise, will be applied to improve beamforming analysis methods, facilitate the design of more effective microphone arrays, and significantly enhance the understanding and characterization of noise sources from landing gear.The proposed approach involves the use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to generate data on the nearfield unsteadiness in jet flows. The nearfield noise is then numerically propagated to the farfield phased array microphone locations. Beamforming analysis methods will be used to predict noise source locations, and these predictions will then be compared with the original LES results. Discrepancies between the phased array prediction and the LES flowfield results will be used to guide development of new and improved phased array source models, as well as develop improved methods for positioning Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings (FWH) integration surfaces around complex noise-generating configurations such as landing gear.When fully developed, this technique offers the potential for significant benefits. First, it will empower experimental aeroacoustics researchers to customize the layout of microphone arrays for a given experimental configuration. Similarly, this approach offers the potential to customize the analysis of the recorded data they take for optimum accuracy. Beyond this, the improved FWH and beamforming methods that will be developed using this technique will benefit any experiment which makes use of phased arrays of microphones. Finally, the work will add to the overall understanding of landing gear noise.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.86K | Year: 2015

Fuel costs have historically been the largest single cost associated with aircraft operations; improved efficiency therefore translates directly to the bottom line. The worldwide aviation industry is a significant emitter of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases; the International Civil Aviation Organization puts it at 2% of the global anthropogenic total. The impact of these emissions is amplified even more, however, because they go directly into the upper troposphere. We propose an efficient plasma-based method for drag reduction which, when fully developed will directly translate to reduced fuel consumption and reduced emissions. The proposed Phase I effort will involve a combined experimental and numerical investigation aimed at a proof-of-concept implementation of the drag-reducing technology. In follow-on Phase II work, the ITAC-led team will work to expand the flight envelope over which the plasma-based method can be applied.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 740.12K | Year: 2014

This Phase II SBIR project deals with the design, development, and testing of a "Plasma Fairing" to reduce noise on the Gulfstream G550 landing gear. The plasma fairing will use single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators to reduce flow- separations and impingement around the landing gear, which are the dominant sources of landing gear noise. The Phase I project successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the plasma fairing concept on a generalized tandem cylinder configuration that shared important features of key sections of the G550 landing gear, specifically the relationship between the strut and the torque arm. The Phase II extends the concept to a more complex geometry: G550 landing gear. We will develop aeroacoustic simulations using University of Notre Dame's state-of-the-art plasma actuator model and Exa Corporation's flow solver PowerFLOW, coupled with experiments in an anechoic wind tunnel with both aerodynamic and acoustic measurements on a scaled G550 nose gear model to design and optimize a Plasma Fairing configuration that provides significant noise reduction on the G550 landing gear. We anticipate a technology readiness level (TRL) of 5 at the end of the Phase II project.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2014

ITAC and its partners propose to develop and demonstrate a computational technology and methodology tool for the concurrent automated shaping of aft airframe and nozzle geometries to reduce tactical aircraft jet noise without any performance penalties. The proposed technologies will lead to an integrated tool which inherently maintains critical aerodynamic performance while reducing the noise generated through the process. The ability of the proposed technology to simultaneously address the entire empennage and nozzle geometry represents a quantum leap over existing design tools.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.86K | Year: 2012

The one CFD modeling area that has remained the most challenging, yet most critical to the success of integrated propulsion system simulations, is turbulence modeling. There is a need to develop mid-level CFD models for the interaction of turbulence and chemical reactions that give superior results to the simple models (e.g., Magnussen's Eddy Dissipation Concept), but which do not require the large computational expense of the very complex models (e.g., PDF evolution methods or the Linear Eddy Method). This SBIR program proposes to develop this capability by extending the Eddy Dissipation Concept of Magnussen (EDC) to allow for improved modeling of reacting flows?especially diffusion flames where the flow contains significant regions of mixing prior to combustion. In Phase I, the proposed approach will be demonstrated using a Magnussen model with a global one-step reaction mechanism. The effect of the modified model on the predicted combustion relative to the original Magnussen EDC will be demonstrated on a test case.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT:Innovative Technology Applications Company, LLC proposes the development of an analytical tool that predicts jet noise and engine performance for current and future generations of supersonic two- and three-stream engines. The goal is to provide robust and reliable noise predictions in minutes that can be used for design optimization. The physics-based approach will be capable of addressing both the noise resulting from engine/nozzle designs and also the effects of configuration changes.BENEFIT:Current engine performance and noise prediction models are either too costly to use in a design process (e.g. RANS and LES simulations) or are too limited in the geometry they can address (e.g. restricted to axi-symmetric nozzles). In contrast, the current approach promises robust solutions with reasonable accuracy in minutes for nozzles with arbitrary geometry. This level of performance will allow a much tighter integration of complex nozzle configurations (and resulting noise considerations) into the overall design process. This capability will lead both to improved performance and also reduced noise levels compared to what can be achieved with current methods.

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