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Stevens M.C.,Innovative Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology Laboratory | Stevens M.C.,Queensland University of Technology | Bradley A.P.,Queensland University of Technology | Wilson S.J.,Queensland University of Technology | Mason D.G.,Queensland University of Technology
Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing | Year: 2013

A morphological filter (MF) is presented for the determination of beat-to-beat mean rotary left ventricular assist device (LVAD) flow rate, measured using an implanted flow probe. The performance of this non-linear filter was assessed using LVAD flow rate (QLVAD) data sets obtained from in silico and in vivo sources. The MF was compared with a third-order Butterworth filter (BWF) and a 10-s moving average filter (MAF). Performance was assessed by calculating the response time and steady state error across a range of heart rates and levels of noise. The response time of the MF was 3.5 times faster than the MAF, 0.5 s slower than the BWF, and had a steady state error of 2.61 %. It completely removed pulsatile signal components caused by residual ventricular function, and tracked sharp transient changes in QLVAD better than the BWF. The use of a two-stage MF improved the noise immunity compared to the single-stage MF. This study showed that the good performance characteristics of the non-linear MF make it a more suitable candidate for embedded real-time processing of QLVAD than linear filters. © 2013 International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering. Source


Gregory S.D.,University of Queensland | Gregory S.D.,Innovative Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology Laboratory | Gregory S.D.,Critical Care Research Group | Stevens M.C.,Queensland University of Technology | And 7 more authors.
Artificial Organs | Year: 2013

Abstract:: Aortic insufficiency (AI) is usually repaired prior to rotary blood pump (RBP) implantation but can develop during support due, in part, to the sustained RBP-induced high pressure gradient across the aortic valve. Repair of the aortic valve before or during RBP support predisposes these critically ill patients to even higher risks. This study used an in vitro mock circulation loop to identify the severity of AI and/or left heart failure (LHF) that might benefit from valve repair while investigating RBP operating strategies to reduce the hemodynamic influence of AI. Reproduction of AI with RBP-supported LHF reduced device efficiency, particularly in the more severe cases of AI and LHF. The requirement for repair or closure of the aortic valve was demonstrated in all conditions other than those with only mild AI. When a sinusoidal RBP speed pulse was induced, small changes in systemic flow rate and regurgitant volume were observed with all degrees of AI. Variation of the pulse phase delay only resulted in minor changes to systemic flow rate, with a maximum difference of 0.17L/min. Although the clinical implications of these small changes may be insignificant, changes in systemic flow rate and transvalvular pressure were shown when the sinusoidal RBP speed pulse was applied with no AI. In these cases, transvalvular pressure was reduced by up to 8% through sinusoidal copulsation of the RBP, which may prevent or delay the onset of AI. This in vitro study suggests that surgical intervention is required with moderate or worse AI and that RBP operating strategies should be further explored to delay the onset and reduce the harmful effects of AI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation. Source


Nestler F.,Queensland University of Technology | Nestler F.,Innovative Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology Laboratory | Nestler F.,Critical Care Research Group | Bradley A.P.,Queensland University of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Artificial Organs | Year: 2014

The accurate representation of rotary blood pumps in a numerical environment is important for meaningful investigation of pump-cardiovascular system interactions. Although numerous models for ventricular assist devices (VADs) have been developed, modeling methods for rotary total artificial hearts (rTAHs) are still required. Therefore, an rTAH prototype was characterized in a steady flow, hydraulic test bench over a wide operational range for pump and hydraulic parameters. In order to develop a generic modeling method, a data-driven modeling approach was chosen. k-Nearest-neighbors, artificial neural networks, and support vector machines (SVMs) were the machine learning approaches evaluated. The best performing parameters for each algorithm were determined via optimization. The resulting multiple-input-multiple-output models were subsequently assessed under identical conditions, and a SVM with a radial basis function kernel was identified as the best performing. The achieved root mean squared errors were 0.03L/min, 0.06L/min, and 0.18W for left and right flow and motor power consumption, respectively. In comparison with existing models for VADs, the flow errors are more than 70% lower. Further advantages of the SVM model are the robustness to measurement noise and the capability to operate outside of the trained parameter range. This proposed modeling method will accelerate further device refinements by providing a more appropriate numerical environment in which to evaluate the pump-cardiovascular system interaction. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation. Source


Kaufmann T.A.S.,RWTH Aachen | Gregory S.D.,University of Queensland | Gregory S.D.,Innovative Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology Laboratory | Busen M.R.,RWTH Aachen | And 3 more authors.
Artificial Organs | Year: 2014

It has been shown that left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) increase the survival rate in end-stage heart failure patients. However, there is an ongoing demand for an increased quality of life, fewer adverse events, and more physiological devices. These challenges necessitate new approaches during the design process. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), lumped parameter (LP) modeling, mock circulatory loops (MCLs), and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are combined to develop a numerical Pump Testing Framework (nPTF) capable of analyzing local flow patterns and the systemic response of LVADs. The nPTF was created by connecting a CFD model of the aortic arch, including an LVAD outflow graft to an LP model of the circulatory system. Based on the same geometry, a three-dimensional silicone model was crafted using rapid prototyping and connected to an MCL. PIV studies of this setup were performed to validate the local flow fields (PIV) and the systemic response (MCL) of the nPTF. After validation, different outflow graft positions were compared using the nPTF. Both the numerical and the experimental setup were able to generate physiological responses by adjusting resistances and systemic compliance, with mean aortic pressures of 72.2-132.6mmHg for rotational speeds of 2200-3050rpm. During LVAD support, an average flow to the distal branches (cerebral and subclavian) of 24% was found in the experiments and the nPTF. The flow fields from PIV and CFD were in good agreement. Numerical and experimental tools were combined to develop and validate the nPTF, which can be used to analyze local flow fields and the systemic response of LVADs during the design process. This allows analysis of physiological control parameters at early development stages and may, therefore, help to improve patient outcomes. © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Stevens M.C.,Innovative Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology Laboratory | Stevens M.C.,University of Queensland | Stevens M.C.,Queensland University of Technology | Wilson S.,Queensland University of Technology | And 4 more authors.
Artificial Organs | Year: 2014

Dual rotary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) can provide biventricular mechanical support during heart failure. Coordination of left and right pump speeds is critical not only to avoid ventricular suction and to match cardiac output with demand, but also to ensure balanced systemic and pulmonary circulatory volumes. Physiological control systems for dual LVADs must meet these objectives across a variety of clinical scenarios by automatically adjusting left and right pump speeds to avoid catastrophic physiological consequences. In this study we evaluate a novel master/slave physiological control system for dual LVADs. The master controller is a Starling-like controller, which sets flow rate as a function of end-diastolic ventricular pressure (EDP). The slave controller then maintains a linear relationship between right and left EDPs. Both left/right and right/left master/slave combinations were evaluated by subjecting them to four clinical scenarios (rest, postural change, Valsalva maneuver, and exercise) simulated in a mock circulation loop. The controller's performance was compared to constant-rotational-speed control and two other dual LVAD control systems: dual constant inlet pressure and dual Frank-Starling control. The results showed that the master/slave physiological control system produced fewer suction events than constant-speed control (6 vs. 62 over a 7-min period). Left/right master/slave control had lower risk of pulmonary congestion than the other control systems, as indicated by lower maximum EDPs (15.1 vs. 25.2-28.4mmHg). During exercise, master/slave control increased total flow from 5.2 to 10.1L/min, primarily due to an increase of left and right pump speed. Use of the left pump as the master resulted in fewer suction events and lower EDPs than when the right pump was master. Based on these results, master/slave control using the left pump as the master automatically adjusts pump speed to avoid suction and increases pump flow during exercise without causing pulmonary venous congestion. © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source

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