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News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Karl Thuge, Partner and EVP with Nomad, noted, "We are very proud and humbled to receive this award.  The Nomad team and our 1000+ global partners work extremely hard to provide RELO Direct with multiple options for every request, that have been carefully vetted to match the needs, wants and desires of each guest.  Everyday, we strive to exceed the service expectations of our clients.  We are grateful to be held in such esteem." Nomad Temporary Housing received the top rating in the most recent 14th Annual, Relocation Managers' Survey© conducted by Trippel Survey & Research, LLC.  Nomad is ranked #1 in Overall Satisfaction, Net Satisfaction, Loyalty, Innovation and Partnership, and Willingness to Recommend. Further, Nomad also received numerous other service awards from our valued clients in the last twelve months. In mid-2016, Nomad was honored to be named Corporate Housing Provider of the Year for the Americas by the Forum for Expatriate Management. Nomad Temporary Housing©, based in San Diego, California is a leading provider of temporary apartments, serviced apartments and extended-stay hotel solutions around the world. Nomad utilizes its vast array of partners to offer thousands of apartments and suite hotel rooms to clients in the locations they need, with the selection of choice they demand. Our top clients report Nomad's service delivery is a step above any other global serviced accommodation brand. Nomad also has offices in Calgary, London and Hong Kong. For more information, visit www.nomadtemphousing.com For additional details, please contact Gavan James at 619.313.4300 or gjames@nomadtemphousing.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nomad-temporary-housing-wins-gold-service-excellence-award-from-relo-direct-300441614.html


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

In his role at the alternative investments management firm Altamar, Fernandez is focused on the design, fundraising and management of Altamar's Credit Business and is a member of the Investment Committee of Alta Life Sciences, a life sciences venture fund with a Spanish and European focus launched in 2016. Fernandez has also worked as Managing Director at Credit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank, and as a consultant for the World Bank as a securities and debt capital markets expert. Fernandez has also served on the Board of Directors of the European Investment Bank and as a Board Member of CESCE (Spain's export credit agency). Between 2010 and 2013, he worked for Professor Andrew W. Lo at MIT's Laboratory for Financial Engineering on the biomedical megafund project. He has authored various papers on this field, focusing on the use of securitization techniques to spur investments in early stage drug development for critical diseases. Fernandez holds an MBA from MIT Sloan (Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership), a Masters in Finance from the London Business School, a Masters in Portfolio Management degree from I.E.B. and Bachelor's Degree in Economics and Business from CUNEF (Madrid). "I have a passion for using financial engineering to solve problems and create a better, more sustainable world, and I believe that my goals and dreams align well with the mission of the Human Vaccines Project," said Fernandez. "I am eager to start my work in support of the Human Vaccines Project as the organization advances research in an area that is critical to the future of human health – decoding the human immune system to understand why and how it works to help the body combat diseases." About the Human Vaccines Project The Human Vaccines Project is a nonprofit public-private partnership with a mission to decode the human immune system to accelerate the development of vaccines and immunotherapies against major infectious diseases and cancers. The Project brings together leading academic research centers, industrial partners, nonprofits and governments to address the primary scientific barriers to developing new vaccines and immunotherapies. Support and funding for the Project includes the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, GSK, MedImmune, Sanofi Pasteur, Crucell/Janssen, Regeneron, Pfizer, Moderna, Boehringer Ingelheim, Aeras, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, UC San Diego, The Scripps Research Institute, J. Craig Venter Institute and La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology. To learn more, visit www.humanvaccinesproject.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/jose-maria-fernandez-joins-the-human-vaccines-project-board-of-directors-300450282.html


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

On Thursday morning in Louisville, KY, thousands of grade schoolers gathered together in the halls of the Kentucky Exposition Center, awaiting their moment on the stage to march in the "Parade of Nations." The children, donning costumes from Stormtroopers to starfish, hailed from more than 30 countries across the world—from Saudi Arabia to Macau to Kazakhstan. What drew them to Kentucky? A passion for building competitive robots. The 10th annual VEX Robotics World Championship—the world's largest, with 20,000 students—has been hosted in Louisville for the last three years. The program, presented by the Northrop Grumman Foundation, has grown rapidly, by about 30% each year, Vicki Grisanti, communications director of the Robotics Education & Competition Foundation (REC) told me last year. The competition includes: VEX IQ (elementary and middle school), VEX Robotics Competition (middle and high school), and VEX U (college-level). Earning a spot at the VEX Robotics World Championship is no easy feat. In Kentucky, a state-wide championship drew about 50 high school teams—competing for about eight spots total at the world championship. An all-girl team of first year students from the Kenton County Academies of Innovation and Technology in Fort Mitchell, KY, who had competed in the state-wide tournament, came to the Expo Center as volunteers, and explained the process. The electoral college for robotics is a bit complicated, I learned—each state is allotted a certain number of teams at the world championship, based on how many teams the state has. The teams have been working all year to develop robots that can master the new challenge, called "Starstruck." While last year's competition, "Nothing But Net" involved shooting baskets, this year's tournament is played on a 12-by-12 foot volleyball-like field, in which the robots must pick up star- and cube-shaped objects and hurl them over a "fence." While many robots last year featured a conveyor belt-like system to scoop up the balls and spit them out, several of this year's robots have arms that can pick the object up, and the aim is not quite as important. Also, "the body of the robot is less study" this year, said Claire Walker, a student at Kent County, since the robots don't have the same obstacles in the field that they did last year. But VEX Worlds doesn't just teach kids to learn STEM skills—with teams from across the world, breaking down language and cultural barriers is another important lesson these students learn. Although translators in Mandarin and Spanish are provided, many students must overcome the language barrier in creative ways. And working side-by-side with teammates from different background provides a chance for cross-cultural learning, as well. For the first time last year, a team from Syria came to the champions, with the help of the Lebanon-based Multi Aid Programs, with the goal of helping fight stereotypes about Syrian refugees. And a team arrived from Kazakhstan this year, for the first time ever. SEE: Photos: 'The Olympics of Robotics' shows kids across globe embrace future of robots (TechRepublic) To address the gender gap when it comes to women in tech, a new initiative called Girl Powered aims to double the number of girls on robotics teams in the next five years. The program, spearheaded by the REC Foundation and VEX Robotics, offers resources to help girls—with help from their mentors—succeed in designing, building, programming, and driving robots. In 2016, the REC Foundation gave grants to about 50 teams through Girl Powered, and created an online challenge called "In Her Words Storybook." While a program like Girl Powered is making a broader impact on girls in robotics, one high schooler has taken a hands-on approach to the issue. Mirabelle Scholten, a 16-year-old from Seattle, has been to Haiti three times this year to help train an all-female middle school team called the Regina Assumpta Robotics team. By helping train the girls on that team, who might not have had access to the same level of STEM education as she did, Scholten is contributing to a larger effort to empower girls in science and math. And not only did she help the team develop its robot—Scholten also became involved when the girls needed travel visas. "When they went to the visa program, only eight girls could come," she said. "We wrote letters to the senators and congressman in Washington state to help get support for the visas." The Regina Assumpta team is set to arrive in Louisville on Saturday—one of 6,670 teams to compete in the VEX IQ Challenge Middle School World Championship.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Board of Directors of the Professional BusinessWomen of California (PBWC) today announced the appointment of Emma Pertat as an independent director at-large for the organization, effective immediately. Ms. Pertat’s appointment expands the Board to 14, all of whom are independent directors representing the financial services, high tech, media, government and biotech industries. “Emma Pertat’s 25 years of international experience will add a valuable perspective to our Board of Directors,” said Alexandra Roddy, PBWC President and Chair. “Access to education, employment opportunities, personal health and rights, and gender equality are key issues affecting women and girls around the world. We appreciate her passion to serve as a director at-large and look forward to benefitting from her judgment and counsel.” Ms. Pertat serves as Executive Vice President and General Auditor both at Bank of the West (BoW), and at the holding, BancWest Corporation. In these roles, Ms. Pertat is responsible for directing a comprehensive risk-based program that provides independent evaluations of the adequacy and effectiveness of the Bank’s risk management, internal controls, credit quality, security, and governance processes. She is also a non-voting member of the Executive Management Committee at Bank of the West. Previously, Ms. Pertat served as the Chief Internal Auditor and Managing Director for BNP Paribas North America. Prior to that, she served in various senior positions across the BNP Paribas Group, including Head of Group Training and Skills Development at BNP Paribas in Paris and Chief Administration Officer at BNP Paribas London UK. “It is an honor and a privilege to join this prestigious board,” said Pertat. “I deeply share the objectives of PBWC’s mission statement and intend to bring to bear my international expertise and local community relationships to this organization.” With over 25 years of international experience in countries including France, Canada, United Kingdom, Luxembourg and the United States, Ms. Pertat has been responsible for the management and supervision of multicultural teams and complex projects in the BNP Paribas Group. She considers herself a “world citizen” and enjoys every minute of her international exposure. She is also a strong believer in women’s capabilities, their leadership skills and their ability to deliver high quality work in their jobs, and to strongly contribute to the sustainable performance of their companies and colleagues. Ms. Pertat holds a bachelor’s degree in History from Université Paris-IV – Sorbonne, a master’s degree in Mandarin from Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales and an M.B.A. from Theseus International Management Institute in Strategy, Innovation and New Technologies (now EDHEC - Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales du Nord). More recently, she attended the Cycle of Advanced European Studies at National School of Administration (ENA – France). The Professional BusinessWomen of California was founded in 1989 by U.S. Congresswoman Jackie Speier to provide skill development, networking opportunities and inspiration to women at all levels to achieve their own ambitions and collectively advance gender equity in professional settings. Community events, monthly webinars and an annual conference provide forums for women’s professional and personal growth and development through tools, training workshops, resources, mentoring and motivation. The organization also presents an annual academic scholarship to a minimum of three California women who are high school seniors. PBWC is headquartered in Northern California, and is one of the largest women’s organizations, boasting a diverse community of over 35,000 professionals worldwide, corporate sponsors and media partners. Learn more at pbwc.org.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Arctic lands and waters hold irresistible allure for global oil companies. Despite opposition from environmental groups and President Obama’s 2016 ban on drilling in federal Arctic waters, exploration in Alaska has revealed massive new volumes of oil. This comes at a time of low oil prices, when many observers felt the Arctic would remain off limits. Alaska has proved precisely the opposite. Although it has gone largely unnoticed outside the industry, foreign firms are partnering with American companies to pursue these new possibilities. I expect this new wave of Arctic development will help increase U.S. oil production and influence in world oil markets for at least the next several decades. This is a global story, spurred by continued growth in world oil demand, especially in Asia; the dynamism of the oil industry; and the fact that the United States has become a major new petroleum exporter, something that would have seemed impossible only a few years ago. Such realities imply that decisions made in Washington, D.C. are far from the only forces shaping U.S. energy and climate change policy. Fracking comes to the Arctic Over the past year oil companies have discovered volumes on Alaska’s North Slope totaling as much as five billion barrels or more of recoverable oil. This is a 14 percent increase in U.S. proven reserves, based on recent estimates, which is no small thing. One discovery, “Horseshoe,” made this year by the Spanish company Repsol in partnership with Denver-based Armstrong Oil and Gas, is the largest new U.S. find in more than 30 years. It is estimated at 1.2 billion barrels, and comes just after a find by ConocoPhillips in January, called “Willow,” evaluated at 300 million barrels. Both of these are dwarfed by “Tulimaniq,” a spectacular discovery drilled by Dallas-based Caelus Energy in the shallow state waters of Smith Bay, about 120 miles northwest of Prudhoe Bay, in October 2016. Caelus has confirmed a total accumulation of as much as 10 billion barrels of light, mobile oil, with 3-4 billion barrels possibly recoverable at current prices of about US$50 per barrel. These new finds may only be the beginning. Tulimaniq will produce from reservoirs of the same age as Horseshoe and Willow, 75 miles to the southeast. This strongly suggests that a large new stretch of the North Slope, mostly on federal land and in state waters (within three miles of shore), has been defined for further exploration. Burgundy Xploration of Houston and Australia-based 88 Energy also have another new drilling program underway to test shale intervals known to have sourced some of the oil at Prudhoe Bay, a supergiant field that has produced some 13 billion barrels to date. A number of these new wells will be fracked using techniques similar to those now employed in the lower 48 – the first time this has been done in the Arctic. Though hydraulic fracturing has been utilized here since the 1980s, these operations were much smaller in scale and focused on just one or a few stages (fractured interval), whereas today’s wells in North Dakota and Texas involve dozens of stages and thus far larger volumes of water and proppant (sand or ceramic grains). One or more of the oil-bearing rock units at sites being explored on the North Slope have low permeability, meaning that oil can’t flow within them very well or at all. Company engineers expect that hydraulic fracturing will be able to free such oil so it can be produced. Such has been the result for other shales and low-permeability reservoirs in places like North Dakota and Texas. The logistics of finding large quantities of water and sand needed for fracking in the Arctic will be challenging, and probably more expensive than similar operations in the lower 48 states. The water will most likely be seawater treated for this specific use. It remains to be seen whether operators will clean, reuse and carefully contain frack water. In another significant find, Italian company Eni has developed an oil field that lies in state waters, and so is not affected by Obama’s drilling ban. But the oil reservoir extends into federal waters of the Beaufort Sea. Called the Nikaitchuq Unit, it lies just west of Prudhoe Bay and is producing around 25,000 barrels per day. Eni developed this field between 2005 and 2015 using an artificial island to drill horizontal wells in various directions from a single site. The company stopped activity in 2015 when prices collapsed, but intends to drill up to six wells this year. Its leases, which continue north into federal waters, were not automatically canceled by the federal ban, but Eni needs a federal drilling permit and has submitted an application to the Interior Department. The company plans to run a long horizontal well to access the additional oil, thereby avoiding any need for a rig in federal waters. The Interior Department is now reviewing Eni’s application, which I expect it will approve. Geologic studies indicate that the oil continues across the state/federal boundary, and Eni’s proposal to use a horizontal lateral from an existing drill site appears to be aimed at minimizing environmental impacts. Moreover, the Trump administration has pledged to promote fossil fuel development. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is a former congressman from Montana, which produces oil, gas and coal, and Alaska senators Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan are strong proponents of oil and gas development. Why is all of this new Arctic drilling happening at a time when oil prices are low and in a place where production costs are high? The oil price collapse that has occurred since mid-2014 is the deepest slump since 1986. Oil companies have ways of being nimble in hard times, such as selling assets, adjusting production levels and seeking mergers. Now rapid innovations in drilling, seismic imaging and data processing enable well-run companies to cut costs in multiple areas. Some firms can make money today at prices as low as $35 to $40 per barrel or even lower. This includes drilling offshore and fracking onshore. Innovation and cost-cutting have made U.S. firms a potent global force and eroded OPEC’s dominance by keeping oil supplies high, despite a significant production cut by the cartel and many non-OPEC producers, including Russia. In this new era, smaller companies are making inroads in areas once reserved for giants like BP and Exxon. This shift is significant because smaller, independent companies, for whom new discoveries are especially important, tend to be aggressive explorers. Oil remains our one unreplaceable energy source. Global mobility and a modern military are, as yet, inconceivable without it. Growth in global demand, centered in developing Asia, will continue for some time, as it did even from 2010 through 2014 when prices were above $90 per barrel. The United States now exports around 5.7 million barrels per day of crude oil and refined petroleum products, double the level of five years ago and by far the largest volume in our nation’s history, thanks to major increases in sales to Japan, South Korea, India, Taiwan, Singapore and China. In short, we would be expanding fossil fuel production even without a Trump administration. If these new discoveries become producing fields, the Alaskan Arctic will write a new chapter in the U.S. oil industry’s dramatic ascent. It will increase our leverage over OPEC and may help to counter Russia’s geopolitical influence. This prospect raises a new question: How will we will use our clout as the world’s most important new oil power?


News Article | January 13, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

Pharma buyout Pharmaceutical company Shire of Dublin is buying rival firm Baxalta of Bannockburn, Illinois, in a US$32-billion deal, after a months-long pursuit. Both companies focus on rare-disease areas, including haematology, immunology and neuroscience. The firms say that as one company they will be able to make $500 million in cost savings. Shire will pay Baxalta shareholders in cash and shares, giving them around 34% ownership of the merged company. The deal is awaiting approval by regulators. Cancer screening The California sequencing-technology firm Illumina announced the formation of a new company, GRAIL, on 10 January. GRAIL will use Illumina’s genetic-sequencing technology to screen for cancer from a blood sample. A ‘liquid biopsy’ would find minuscule amounts of tumour-specific DNA or RNA in the blood before the person felt symptoms of the disease, when it may be easier to treat. GRAIL has more than US$100 million in funding, in part from Bill Gates and from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Early star remnants A faraway gas cloud has been discovered that contains tiny amounts of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium — such as carbon, oxygen and iron — that are possible remnants of the Universe’s first stars. The elements were detected in spectra collected by the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope in Chile, and computer simulations show how the Universe’s first stars would have exploded and spewed the elements out (pictured). The results were reported at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Kissimmee, Florida, on 8 January. The cloud is so distant that it appears as it did 1.8 billion years after the Big Bang. China science prize A team led by quantum physicist Jian-Wei Pan was awarded the first-class prize of China’s 2015 National Natural Science Award, one of the country’s top science accolades, on 8 January. Pan and his team at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei won for their pioneering work in quantum entanglement and teleportation. For the first time in 11 years, no one was awarded China’s top science prize, the State Supreme Science and Technology Award. Pharmacologist Youyou Tu, who last year won China its first science Nobel, had been tipped for the award. Singapore surge Science spending in Singapore is set to surge by 18%, the government announced on 8 January. At its annual meeting, the country’s Research, Innovation and Enterprise Council endorsed plans to invest 19 billion Singapore dollars (US$13.2 billion) between 2016 and 2020, up from 16.1 billion Singapore dollars between 2011 and 2015. The country will prioritize research funding in four areas: advanced manufacturing, health and biomedical sciences, services and the digital economy, and urban sustainability. Oil-pipeline fight Pipeline firm TransCanada Corporation said on 6 January that it will seek more than US$15 billion in compensation for economic losses under the North American Free Trade Agreement after the Keystone XL pipeline that it was due to build was cancelled (unused pipes pictured). The pipeline would have carried relatively dirty oil from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, to US refineries. But in November 2015, the US Department of State said that the project was not in the “national interest”. TransCanada, which is headquartered in Calgary, called the decision “arbitrary and unjustified”, arguing that the project was environmentally benign. The company is also challenging the decision in the US federal court. H-bomb claims North Korea’s fourth nuclear test on 6 January was almost certainly not a hydrogen bomb, contrary to the country’s claims. The seismic event caused by the test was estimated at magnitude 4.85 by the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization in Vienna. The explosion that caused that event was probably hundreds or thousands of times smaller than would have resulted from a hydrogen bomb, analysts say. North Korea might have tested a boosted fission device: a conventional fission bomb with a small quantity of the hydrogen isotopes tritium and deuterium added. See go.nature.com/gyqqya and page 127 for more. Science passport Seven science publishers, including PLOS and the American Geophysical Union, announced on 7 January that they will start requiring researchers to identify themselves using the ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) system when submitting papers. Globally, 1.8 million researchers have registered for ORCID’s unique identifiers — machine-readable numbers akin to a scientific passport. The system is run by a non-profit organization that aims to create a transparent record linking scientists to their research outputs (see Nature 526, 281–283; 2015). Chimps returned A legal battle over the ‘personhood’ of two chimpanzees has ended with their return to a primate facility in Louisiana, Science reported on 8 January. The two chimps were loaned to the State University of New York at Stony Brook for use as research animals. Animal-rights group the Nonhuman Rights Project sued in New York to have the animals released to a sanctuary, arguing that the chimps should have certain legal rights afforded to humans. The return of the chimps to the New Iberia Research Center in early December effectively removes the animals from New York’s jurisdiction. Insecticide threat The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said on 6 January that the controversial insecticide imidacloprid does present a threat to bees and other pollinators. The preliminary risk assessment is the first of four on the neonicotinoids, an insecticide class that has been linked to bee declines. The European Food Safety Authority announced on 11 January that it would be updating its own risk assessments of three neonicotinoids — clothianidin, thiamethoxam and imidacloprid. The European Union heavily restricted use of neonicotinoids in 2013 on the basis of previous evaluations. UK drinking guides Any level of alcohol intake increases cancer risk, according to draft guidelines released by the UK Chief Medical Officers on 8 January. Men and women should drink no more than 14 units of alcohol per week — around 7 glasses of wine or 6 pints of average-strength beer — according to the recommendations, which substantially lower the amount for men. The models used to calculate the recommendations considered risks and benefits, for instance cancer and alleged beneficial cardiovascular effects. The guidelines have had a mixed reception, with some complaints that they are ‘nannying’. See page 127 for more. Linear collider Japan should ramp up its expertise as it prepares to host the world’s next-generation particle smasher in the 2020s, reports the country’s High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Tsukuba. An action plan published on 6 January lays out the KEK’s goals for the preparation phases of the International Linear Collider, including a goal to triple the number of home-grown accelerator scientists and engineers. In 2012, Japanese researchers proposed hosting the 31-kilometre-long accelerator, which will smash electrons together with their antimatter partners. However, no government has yet promised any funding. Nations burned off around 143 billion cubic metres of natural gas — roughly 3.5% of global production — into the atmosphere in 2012, according to researchers at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (C. D. Elvidge et al. Energies 9, 14; 2016). Data from a polar-orbiting satellite showed that Russia led the way in terms of volume. The practice is common in fields that lack pipelines and markets for natural gas and policymakers are looking for ways to avoid the wastage. 3.9 × 1013 The number of bacteria in a typical human, alongside 3 × 1013 human cells. This new estimate challenges the idea that bacteria outnumber human cells by 10 to 1. Source: Sender, R., Fuchs, S. & Milo, R. Preprint at bioRxiv http://doi.org/bbpz (2016). 17 January NASA plans to launch its Jason3 satellite to measure Earth’s sea levels, adding to knowledge of ocean circulation and climate change. go.nature.com/rqfqmh 19–21 January The Festival of Genomics takes place in London, bringing together industrialists, academics and policymakers. go.nature.com/cw5hfb


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: phys.org

This innovative new design, led by Planet Ocean & co-developed by NOC, ASV ltd & The University of Southampton, is around three times smaller than current autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). At around 50cm long, their tiny size allows them to be used in ways previously not considered. Microsubs are also able to frequently monitor infrastructure, such as pipelines for corrosion or potential leaks in an extremely cost effective manner. The new ecoSUBμ and larger ecoSUBm are economically and environmentally more cost efficient than their larger counterparts. Furthermore, a 'shoal' of microsubs can work together to collectively create a far superior 3-D map of the underwater environment than a lone AUV. They can survey a large area very quickly, covering hundreds of kilometres. Paired with complementary technologies, such as autonomous surface vehicles and satellites, a more complete picture of the oceanic environment can be constructed than ever before. This new sub was developed at the new Marine Robotics Innovation Centre with the NOC, who have twenty years' experience of AUV development, and Planet Ocean. Kevin Forshaw, NOC's Associate Director, Innovation and Enterprise said "this is an example of a highly innovate new product, that is being rapidly brought to market due to the comprehensive support being offered from the technical team within the Marine Robotics Innovation Centre. Product development such as this, that draws on leading thinking from NOC and the University of Southampton, will help UK PLC to make further inroads into this rapidly expanding global market." The ecoSUB's were unveiled during the Marine Robotics and Technology showcase, a week of events celebrating the one year anniversary of the marine robotics Innovation Centre. This soft launch comes after just one year into a two year project, with the next phase being all about testing before the product officially comes to market at Ocean Business in April 2017. A spin out company from Planet Ocean, ecoSUB Robotics Ltd. has been formed to concentrate on the development and manufacture of these innovative vehicles. Planet Ocean Managing Director Terry Sloane commented "Having our engineers co-located within the NOC, in the new Innovation Centre, has been key to the success of this project and to the speed at which the project has progressed." Explore further: Contracts awarded in new generation ocean robot project


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

MUMBAI, INDIA--(Marketwired - November 14, 2016) - Aurionpro Solutions Ltd ( : AURIONPRO) ( : 532668), a provider of technology solutions for Banking, Digital Innovation and Enterprise Security, announced its financial results for the second quarter ended Sep 30, 2016. * After deduction of one-time non-cash expense of Rs 4.96 Cr pertaining to Employee Stock revaluation during Spikes acquisition, Foreign Currency Translation loss of Rs.3.03 crores and Rs.1.25crore towards amortization of Goodwill on account of merger of Spikes Security. "We had a better performance in this quarter as compared to the previous one. While slowdown in enterprise security business and investment in our Isla platform continues, growth in our digital innovation and government business was quite strong," said Samir Shah, CEO, Aurionpro. He added, "During the quarter we completed the acquisition of Spikes Security. This has resulted in a lower PAT margin due to both product development costs and non-cash charges. We expect our ISLA product will be a game changer for the Malware protection area within the enterprise security domain, and we are extremely bullish on its future. To further signify our focus, during the quarter we rebranded our enterprise security business under the name - Cyberinc. As our investment in IP in this unit matures we expect stronger growth momentum next year. Our other core businesses are strong and we expect continued strong momentum in our banking, digital innovation and government services businesses." Aurionpro Solutions ( : AURIONPRO) ( : 532668) is a Aurionpro is global technology solutions leader that helps clients accelerate their digital innovation, securely and efficiently. We combine core domain expertise, thought leadership in innovation, security and banking, to leverage industry leading IP, and deliver measurable business results for global corporations. With revenues of over $115MN USD and employing more than 1,300 experts across North America, Asia, and Europe, the company has been named among the top 100 technology companies for Financial Services worldwide in 2015. For more information, visit www.aurionpro.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

MUMBAI, INDIA--(Marketwired - February 14, 2017) - Aurionpro Solutions Ltd ( : AURIONPRO) ( : 532668), a provider of technology solutions for Banking, Digital Innovation and Enterprise Security, announced its financial results for the third quarter ended Dec 31, 2016. # Includes Rs 7.3 Cr of investment in ISLATM Product Engineering and R&D. *Includes Rs 1.8 Crores of finance cost for issuance of warrant in the US Financial Highlights for the 9 months period ended December 31, 2016 Ω Last years' revenue includes Rs. 80.41 Crores of IT Consulting revenues "We are very happy to report a growth in profits backed by a robust growth in our Digital Innovation & Banking businesses through the quarter," said Samir Shah, CEO, Aurionpro, "We are seeing some great business traction for our innovative ISLA™ - web malware isolation system. We launched our Virtual Teller Machine variant for our Branch in a box product series at IBEX in January, and will continue on a path of IP driven value creation." "This quarter's results and nine month highlights are to be viewed in light of some one-time expenses, significant R&D and product development investments for ISLA and digital innovation business lines." Samir continued, "Having fully re-organized operational flow and financial structuring we are looking to strong growth in the coming quarter and accelerated revenue growth in financial year 2017-18." Aurionpro Solutions ( : AURIONPRO) ( : 532668) is a Aurionpro is global technology solutions leader that helps clients accelerate their digital innovation, securely and efficiently. We combine core domain expertise, thought leadership in innovation, security and banking, to leverage industry leading IP, and deliver measurable business results for global corporations. With revenues of over $108MN USD and employing more than 1,300 experts across North America, Asia, and Europe, the company has been named among the top 100 technology companies for Financial Services worldwide in 2014. For more information, visit www.aurionpro.com.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.prlog.org

To support the ambition behind the Singapore government's Research, Innovation and Enterprise (RIE) 2020 Plan APACSMA & TBK Consult will be organizing workshops to help the Singapore entrepreneurial communities commercialize their value proposition

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