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Halifax, Canada

Kain K.H.,Innovascreen Inc. | Miller J.W.I.,Vanderbilt University | Jones-Paris C.R.,Vanderbilt University | Thomason R.T.,Vanderbilt University | And 4 more authors.
Developmental Dynamics | Year: 2014

A long and productive history in biomedical research defines the chick as a model for human biology. Fundamental discoveries, including the description of directional circulation propelled by the heart and the link between oncogenes and the formation of cancer, indicate its utility in cardiac biology and cancer. Despite the more recent arrival of several vertebrate and invertebrate animal models during the last century, the chick embryo remains a commonly used model for vertebrate biology and provides a tractable biological template. With new molecular and genetic tools applied to the avian genome, the chick embryo is accelerating the discovery of normal development and elusive disease processes. Moreover, progress in imaging and chick culture technologies is advancing real-time visualization of dynamic biological events, such as tissue morphogenesis, angiogenesis, and cancer metastasis. A rich background of information, coupled with new technologies and relative ease of maintenance, suggest an expanding utility for the chick embryo in cardiac biology and cancer research. Developmental Dynamics 243:216-228, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Patent
Innovascreen Inc. | Date: 2012-08-24

In accordance with the present invention, a family of membrane fusion protein and polynucleotides encoding the proteins have been identified. The proteins and nucleotides are derived from the family Reoviridae. Two membrane fusion proteins have been isolated from reoviruses isolated from poikilothermic hosts: the p14 protein from reptilian reovirus (RRV) isolated from python, and the p16 protein from


Patent
Innovascreen Inc. | Date: 2010-11-04

In accordance with the present invention, a family of membrane fusion protein and polynucleotides encoding the proteins have been identified. The proteins and nucleotides are derived from the family Reoviridae. Two membrane fusion proteins have been isolated from reoviruses isolated from poikilothermic hosts: the p14 protein from reptilian reovirus (RRV) isolated from python, and the p16 protein from aquareovirus (AQV) isolated from salmon. The genes encoding these proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the amino acid sequences of these proteins show that both lack the typical fusion peptide motif found in other membrane fusion proteins. Expression of these proteins in cells results in cell-cell fusion.


Patent
INNOVASCREEN Inc | Date: 2011-01-14

A stage adaptor for imaging a biological specimen is described. The adaptor having a housing; a vented chamber contained within the housing; and a removable lid for covering the vented chamber. A depression is provided on the removable lid for receiving an objective from a microscope. An aperture is also provided at the apex of the depression for viewing inside the vented chamber. Also described is an integrated stage adaptor and imaging system as well as a method for imaging the biological specimen using the stage adaptor.


Pink D.B.S.,Innovascreen Inc. | Schulte W.,Innovascreen Inc. | Parseghian M.H.,Stonsa Biopharm Inc. | Zijlstra A.,Innovascreen Inc. | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

The leaky, heterogeneous vasculature of human tumors prevents the even distribution of systemic drugs within cancer tissues. However, techniques for studying vascular delivery systems in vivo often require complex mammalian models and time-consuming, surgical protocols. The developing chicken embryo is a well-established model for human cancer that is easily accessible for tumor imaging. To assess this model for the in vivo analysis of tumor permeability, human tumors were grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), a thin vascular membrane which overlays the growing chick embryo. The real-time movement of small fluorescent dextrans through the tumor vasculature and surrounding tissues were used to measure vascular leak within tumor xenografts. Dextran extravasation within tumor sites was selectively enhanced an interleukin-2 (IL-2) peptide fragment or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF treatment increased vascular leak in the tumor core relative to surrounding normal tissue and increased doxorubicin uptake in human tumor xenografts. This new system easily visualizes vascular permeability changes in vivo and suggests that vascular permeability may be manipulated to improve chemotherapeutic targeting to tumors. © 2012 Pink et al. Source

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