Torrance, CA, United States
Torrance, CA, United States

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Patent
Innosense LLC | Date: 2017-01-25

The present invention relates to hydrophilic anti-fog coatings. In particular, the coatings use two types of nanoscale particles, colloidal silica and porous organosilicate micelles, in a polyurethane matrix. The invention is an anti-fog coating for optically clear substrates (polycarbonate, polyurethane, nylon, polyester and other clear plastics) without the need for a primer and glass or oxide substrates with an additional primer layer, comprising monosized colloidal silica nanoparticles and porous organosilicate micelles in a polyurethane matrix. The silica is preferably 1-5% by weight and the micelles are loaded at 0.1 to 10% volume percentage by volume. The polyurethane prepolymer is dissolved at 10-40% by weight in a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and diacetone alcohol to customize for dip, flow or spray coating processes.


Patent
University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Innosense LLC | Date: 2017-07-05

This disclosure provides fire retardant materials, including polymers that include at least one pyridinium salt moiety and at least one phosphine oxide moiety. In some cases, fire retardant polymers provided herein have the following structure:


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1000.00K | Year: 2016

The Department of Energy (DOE) seeks useful methods of generating intense beams of reaccelerated rare isotopes for the next-generation Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), currently under construction at Michigan State University. Stopping high-energy, heavy-ion reaction products in fast-release solid catchers is an important method to be developed for realizing intense beams of short-lived isotopes of elemental or molecular species. Short-lived isotopes are expected to play a key role in unraveling the mysteries of nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental interactions at low energies. General statement of how the problem is being addressed: This project will develop refractory, porous oxide monoliths as catchers, which retain open porosity after extended heating at high temperatures. The goal is to ensure that the oxide catcher retains open paths between grains for effusion of atoms or molecules from the catcher to the ion source in order to harvest unused rare isotope beams. Noble gases and reactive molecular species are targeted in these measurements. Simulations will be used as a predictive tool for the transient species of interest. What was done in Phase II: Phase II successfully established production methods to yttria-stabilized zirconia and hafnia disks (1–2 mm). The disks retained open, interconnected porosity (~50%) on the meso- to macro-scale upon heating to 1500 °C for up to 7-days and remained mechanically robust to handling. A very sensitive residual gas analyzer commissioned off-line showed excellent detection of 13CO molecules released from oxide nanopowder doped with 13C isotopic powder and on-line release of implanted 4He. What is planned for the Phase IIB project: More rigorous screening of candidate oxide catchers is planned in Phase IIB, to ensure sintering-free operation in isotope production conditions. On-line release studies will be conducted with light stable beams (4He, 13C) to downselect candidates for in-flight fragmentation reactions with 7Li and 18O to release 6He, and convert-and-release 16CO, both radioactive beams. Another goal is to adapt the porous oxide catcher technology for improved targetry in radioisotope production. Commercial applications and other benefits: Market need for these hot catcher materials exists in beam line facilities and FRIB for rare isotope production. Other potential markets include generation/delivery of radioisotopes to diagnostic and cancer therapy centers.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2016

The micro-porous Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and glass separators currently used in lithium oxyhalide batteries (LOHBs) have limitations in performance, lifetime, safety, and costs. A new separator technology is needed to improve performance, provide more energy-efficient battery geometries, decrease manufacturing complexity, and lower cost by increasing operational lifetime. LOHB reserve cells must utilize materials that: (a) provide electrical isolation between electrodes, (b) maximize volumetric efficiency for electrolyte capacity, (c) optimize efficient electrolyte flow and distribution when the battery is activated, and (d) are suitable for a production environment. The targeted materials chemistry will be capable of integration into other battery systems for military, aerospace and commercial applications. In Phase I, InnoSense (ISL) will demonstrate proof-of-principle of flexible ceramic separators capable of operating in extreme corrosive environments. We will demonstrate MDA-relevant separator performance. We will work closely with industrial partners to ensure smooth integration with LOHBs. In Phase II, ISL will develop and rigorously-test separator prototype establishing scale-up pathways. ISL will have separators tested in oxyhalide batteries for battery performance by our industrial partner. Phase III efforts, in collaboration with our partners, will include further engineering of the separator integrated with LOHB, field level tests and evaluation leading to hardware qualification.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2015

The Department of Energy (DOE) seeks useful methods of generating intense beams of reaccelerated rare isotopes for the next-generation Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), currently under construction at Michigan State University. Stopping high-energy, heavy-ion reaction products in fast-release solid catchers is an important method to be developed for realizing intense beams of short-lived isotopes of elemental or molecular species. Short-lived isotopes are expected to play a key role in unraveling the mysteries of nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental interactions at low energies. This project will develop refractory tungsten powders as catchers, which retain open porosity after extended heating at high temperatures. The goal is to ensure that the tungsten catcher retains open paths between grains for effusion of atoms or molecules from the catcher to the ion source in order to harvest unused rare isotope beams. Alkalis, noble gases and reactive molecular species are targeted in these measurements. Simulations will be used as a predictive tool for the transient species of interest. Phase I demonstrated the feasibility of grain growth suppression in candidate W powders. Offline, ultrahigh vacuum heating of candidate powders showed very low outgassing rates compatible with on-line characterization. Modeling refractory carbides and sulfides to optimize the selective release of specific elements as molecular sidebands was successfully completed. A very sensitive residual gas analyzer commissioned off-line showed excellent sensitivity to detect 13CO molecules released from alumina nanopowder doped with 13C isotopic powder. More rigorous screening of candidate W catchers is planned in Phase II, to ensure sintering-free operation in isotope production conditions. On-line release studies will be conducted with light beams (4He, 7Li, 13C and 18O) followed by heavier beams (136Xe and 120Sn). Predictive simulations of release characteristics will be validated through on-line release profiles. Commercial applications and other benefits: The immediate market need for these hot catcher materials is the DOE and installations like FRIB that have powerful and unique techniques for rare isotope production. Potential other markets include porous metals, metal foams in thermal management applications and medical applications such as diagnostics and cancer therapy.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 764.99K | Year: 2016

PROJECT SUMMARY Alzheimer s disease AD is a complex and severe neurodegenerative disorder AD is characterized by synapse and neuron loss in the brain with the accumulation of senile plaques protein containing deposits and neurofibrillary tangles Approximately million Americans and globally million people are affected and this number is growing rapidly In the cumulative cost of care for AD and other dementia was estimated at $ billion Yet there is no definitive point of care POC diagnostic for AD Current standard methods of AD diagnosis involve a combination of imaging and cognitive tests which are expensive and require complicated time consuming laboratory based analysis while definitive diagnosis is made postmortem Because early diagnosis could enable better planned and coordinated care there is an urgent need to develop a cost effective highly sensitive and selective diagnostic tool for pre symptomatic AD diagnosis which could also be used as a convenient monitoring device for bedside or primary POC use In Phase I InnoSense LLC ISL developed a conducting polymer nanowire based biosensor Adnos for detecting AD biomarkers ISL constructed a working model and demonstrated its capability for detecting AD associated biomarkers in spiked solutions with phosphate buffered saline and artificial cerebrospinal fluid aCSF as well as CSF samples from patients ISL demonstrated that Adnos devices had an average limit of detection of fM for AD specific biomarkers The results indicate that Adnos has better sensitivity than standard laboratory tests such as Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay ELISA nanomolar for AD protein analysis In Phase II ISL will further develop fine tune and rigorously evaluate Adnos performance for detecting AD specific biomarkers ISL will optimize the Adnos nanowire sensor fabrication process toward assay development construct a prototype with necessary electronics and software fine tune the prototype performance for accurate detection and monitoring of AD specific biomarkers with a limit of detection of fM in less than min demonstrate ability of a prototype Adnos to detect AD biomarkers in clinical CSF samples and compare the performance with standard ELISA and dot blot tests and prepare to secure CLIA waiver while we explore commercial options The ability to detect the earliest stages of AD prior to onset of symptoms could potentially have a powerful impact on families to plan for future healthcare needs development of early stage intervention strategies and gain the ability to understand and manage the entire lifecycle of the disease Use of the Adnos system will be highly valuable as a tool providing monitoring data for clinical studies in search of effective treatments for AD PROJECT NARRATIVE Alzheimer s disease AD a debilitating and progressive neurodegenerative disease with no known cure is the leading cause of dementia among Americans over age In Phase I InnoSense LLC ISL developed Adnos a sensitive biosensor that proved capable of detecting femtomolar level AD specific biomarkers in artificial cerebrospinal fluid aCSF thereby indicating a potential to outperform standard laboratory tests such as Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay ELISA nanomolar for AD protein analysis In Phase II ISL will further develop the assay and rigorously evaluate Adnos performance for detecting AD biomarkers in a microliter volume of CSF in the femtomolar range in less than min


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

The Department of Energy (DOE) High Energy Physics (HEP) program seeks development of technologies to reduce machine size and cost, and to develop new concepts and capabilities that further scientific and commercial needs beyond HEP’s discovery science mission. InnoSense LLC (ISL) will develop radiation resistant foam and putty to encapsulate the NuMI 2 horn and other large radioactive object s during short term storage and shipping to a permanent disposal site. General statement of how this problem is being addressed: During the proposed project, the company will develop polyurethane-silicone matrix foams with various additives be delivered to Fermilab for evaluation in Phase I, for the NuMI project. The foam composition and structure will be optimized for radiation resistance NoRaLFoam™ to withstand >1 MegaGray for 1-3 months and prevent release of friable or spalled materials from large bulky radioactive objects during the shipping and short term storage needed to transport to deposition at a sequestration site. What is to be done in Phase I: Polyurethane-silicone matrix foams will be formulated with additives to produce a composition and structure to block beta and gamma radiation, as well as have sufficient strength to hold spalling and other relatively small particles from escaping dueling transport and storage. Testing of the raw materials will be done to characterize microstructure, and foam properties. At least four (4) samples will be delivered to Fermilab for their evaluation by the end of Phase I. Commercial applications and other benefits: Radiation resistant foam can prevent release of radioactive material from mechanical spalling and abrasion of bulking items when shifting in containers during transport. This material can assist in reducing the cost and increase the safety of handling radioactive materials during ransport. Lower cost and more efficient radioactive material sequestration during transport will reduce the need for radioactive hazardous materials cleanup in the event of unwanted nuclear materials release. This material can be used for both civilian and military shipment of radioactive bulky items not only within the United States but worldwide, as well. Key words: High Energy Physics, radiation resistant foam, radiation resistant foam and putty, Fermilab, polyurethane-silicone matrix foams, beta radiation, gamma radiation, neutron


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

The Department of Energy needs improved radiation resistant electrical insulation materials for the superconducting magnet coils in fusion reactors. To achieve safe, reliable, economic and environmentally benign fusion energy system, DOE is seeking organic/inorganic insulation-capable materials that are wrappable. These materials under irradiation will enable magnet coils to: (1) operate reliably over long periods, (2) enhance system performance with high bond strength, (3) attain improved shear strength, and (4) show radiation resistance with low gas generation. These materials must demonstrate considerable cost reduction through the use of cost-effective materials and fabrication processes. Statement of how this problem or situation is being addressed: During the proposed project, the company will develop a new ORganic-InOrganic Hybrid Nanocomposite material matrix. This electrical insulating material matrix will be based on hybrid sol-gel technology. Innovations will be incorporated to achieve radiation resistance, high mechanical strength, high thermal stability, and high chemical resistance. These attributes are highly important for improved electrical insulation for superconducting magnet coils used in fusion reactors helping to achieve DOE program goals for fusion energy systems. What is to be done in Phase I: In Phase I, the project team will develop, characterize and demonstrate this new nanocomposite material system as a radiation-resistant electrical insulator. Several compositions will be prepared and evaluated for radiation tolerance, including electron, gamma and neutron exposure, and radiation-induced gas evolution rate, thermal and mechanical performance. This effort will position the company to transition the insulating material to Phase II development. Commercial applications and other benefits: The hybrid nanocomposite coating proposed for DOE advanced electrical insulation can be adapted for use in medical devices for cancer therapy, medical imaging systems, high-field accelerator magnets motors/generators in extreme conditions (space missions, military and commercial satellites, military operations in cold climates), and aerospace equipment. Key words: Radiation Resistant, Dielectric films, Polymer, Hybrid sol-gel, Superconducting Magnets, Fusion Reactor, Magnet coil insulation


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

In-orbit or deep space-based plant growth systems are of interest to NASA as part of fundamental space research and for ensuring supply of fresh produce to the crew. These systems are part of enabling technologies for sustainable and long-term human spaceflight. Ethylene gas is a natural plant metabolite and phytohormone. In enclosed spaceship settings, ethylene build-up can be deleterious to plants. Thus, there is a need to monitor ethylene in real-time, sensitively, reversibly and effectively. Currently, state of the art technology is limited with portability and detection sensitivity issues. To close this technology gap, InnoSense LLC (ISL) will develop a solid state electrochemical sensor (Polymer Nanowire based ethylene Monitor (PNet-Mon)). To expedite this development, PNet-Mon will build on electronic hardware platform engineered by ISL previously. The innovation on this project will only be on ethylene sensing. This effort directly addresses a need expressed in NASA Technical Roadmap (TA 6).


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

Future manned spacecraft venturing into deep space will require sophisticated thermal control systems to protect against extreme environments ranging from direct illumination by solar radiation to complete darkness. To manage these extremes, heat exchangers composed of phase change materials, which can expand and contract without causing structural damage, will be essential. NASA is seeking non-toxic heat transfer fluids with transition temperatures between 8 and 12 (deg)C with heat of fusion >200 kJ/kg. Specifically, the fluids must have suitable thermal conductivity, high heat capacity, and low viscosity to enable flow with negligible volume expansion. Changes are also needed to reduce the existing heat transfer unit size and weight. InnoSense LLC (ISL) plans to develop new modified ionic liquid-based phase change materials heat exchangers. ISL, in collaboration the University of Nevada, will synthesize salt additives to modulate the operating temperatures, and the thermal and flow properties of the ionic liquid based eutectic phase change material with negligible volume change during phase change. In Phase I, ISL will formulate and test heat transfer formulations in a laboratory environment to demonstrate feasibility. During Phase II, ISL will scale-up synthesis and test fluid performance in a larger experimental apparatus and a wide range of working environments.

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