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Qi Y.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College | Zou Z.,Shandong University
Hanjie Xuebao/Transactions of the China Welding Institution | Year: 2013

A new in-situ synthesis method was used to prepare the composite coating reinforced by Ti(CyN1-y) particles through CO2 laser cladding technology. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron probe microscopy analyzer (EPMA) were used to analyze the phases in the composite coating. The results show that Ti(CyN1-y) particles are formed by an in-situ metallurgical reaction of TiN particle and graphite powder during laser cladding process. The nucleation and growth mechanism of the formation of Ti(C, N) particles have close relationship with the original titanium nitride (TiN). When the size of the original titanium nitride particles is small (<5 μm), a great deal of energy absorbed by the cladding material may cause the dissolution of the original titanium nitride (TiN) particles to form the titanium carbonitride Ti(CyN1-y) particles, whose shapes are rhombus. If the size of original titanium nitride particles is big (>5 μm), energy absorbed by the cladding material is limited, so it only causes the outer marginal dissolution of the original titanium nitride (TiN) particles. Finally, the annular structure ceramic particles named titanium carbonitride Ti(CyN1-y) are synthesized by a solid-solution metallurgical reaction in the laser cladding process. Source


Qi Y.-T.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College | Cao Z.-X.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College | Sheng L.-Y.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College | Cao R.-P.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College
Journal of Iron and Steel Research International | Year: 2013

Fc-bascd alloy layer reinforced by Ti(C, N) particles was produced on the surface of cast steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used for phase identification in the composite coating. The microstructure of laser cladding layer was analyzed by means of optical microscope (OM), electron probe microscope analyzer (EPMA), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that Ti(C0.3 N0.7) particle is introduced by an in-situ metallurgical reaction of TiN particle and graphite powder in the process of laser cladding. The shape of lots of Ti(C0.3 N0.7) particle is irregular. The sizes of Ti(C0.3 N0.7) particles range from 0.1 to 6.0 μm, and they arc dispersed evenly in the matrix, which is fine dendritic or cellular crystal. A new kind of phase named Ti(C0.3 N0.7) particles arc tightly bonded with α-Fe microstructure, and there is a clean and smooth phase interface between ceramic reinforcement phase and the matrix. © 2013 Central Iron and Steel Research Institute. Source


Qi Y.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College | Cao R.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College | Cao Z.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College | Zou Z.,Inner Mongolia Baotou Vocational and Technical College
China Welding (English Edition) | Year: 2012

Fe-based alloy coatings reinforced by Ti(C, N) particles was produced through CO2 laser cladding technology. The microstructure of laser cladding coating was analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction(SAED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microscopic analyzer (EPMA). The mechanical property of the layer was measured by using microhardness meter. The results show that Ti (C0.3N0.7) particles are introduced by an in-situ metallurgical reaction between TiN particle and graphite powder during laser cladding process. Titanium carbonitrides particles existed in the layer are fairly fine, ranging from 0.1 μm to 5.0 μm, and evenly dispersed in the metal α-Fe matrix. Most of them take on nearly rhombus shape, and some of them are irregular in shape. The microhardness of laser cladding layer ranges from 770 HV0.3 to 850 HV0.3. © 20120Editorial Board of CHINA WELDING. Source

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