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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The continuing medical education program[1] at the AutismOne 2017 Conference in Colorado Springs, Colorado, will offer 23+ CME credits and feature Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., who was asked by President Donald J. Trump to chair a commission on Vaccine Safety and Scientific Integrity, will be presenting on the risks of mercury in medicine. The CME program will address physicians, nurses, and additional healthcare professionals. Mr. Kennedy authored the book titled Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak (Skyhorse Publishing, 2014), with an introduction by Harvard University/Massachusetts General Hospital pediatric neurologist Martha Herbert, MD, PhD, also an AutismOne CME program presenter. The CME activity, which is targeted toward integrative pediatricians and other healthcare providers who serve those with special needs diagnoses and chronic conditions, is directed by Shawn K. Centers, DO, FACOP. Dr. Centers served as medical director at the clinic of heralded osteopath Dr. Viola Frymann for nearly two decades until opening his new medical practice called The Children’s HOPE Center in San Diego, California, this month. He serves as the Chair of the American Board of Integrative Pediatrics. Dr. Centers will speak during the CME and general conference portions of the event, as will Mr. Kennedy and Dr. Herbert. Speaking with Dr. Centers during the general conference portion will be JoQueta Handy, PhD, SLP-CCC, a credentialed speech-language pathologist with a doctorate in integrative medicine. Dr. Handy will speak on the balanced brain biochemistry and the sensory, educational, and therapeutic strategies needed to optimize learning and success for students with special needs diagnoses. Dr. Handy’s school, the Brilliant Learning School, is located in Irvine, California. The American Association of Integrative Medicine collaborates with AutismOne in the availability of this program, offering the Board Certified in Integrative Pediatrics (BCIP) credential. Experienced, treating clinicians who wish to apply for the BCIP credential can apply on-site with AAIM at the AutismOne 2017 Conference CME program. The AutismOne 2017 Conference, which is being held May 24-28, 2017, at the Hotel Elegante Conference & Event Center in beautiful Colorado Springs, Colorado, offers over 100 presenters. The continuing medical education program spans May 25-27 and includes over 40 speakers. For more information about the CME program[1], please visit http://www.autismone.org/CME-Program-for-Professionals-Autismone-Conference-2017. To register for the conference (basic registration currently $59; additional fees apply to CME program), please visit http://www.autismone.org/content/conference-membership-registration. Notes: [1] Joint-Provided: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Missouri State Medical Association/Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of Institute for International Medicine (INMED) and Autism International Association (DBA AutismOne). Physicians: Institute for International Medicine is accredited by the Missouri State Medical Association/Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Institute for International Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 23.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)ᵀᴹ. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of the participation in the activity.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

VANCOUVER, Dec. 6, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("InMed") (CSE: IN; OTCQB: IMLFF), announced progress today on its R&D program in the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In June, 2015 InMed initiated its COPD...


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.accesswire.com

VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / March 2, 2017 / InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("InMed") (CNSX: IN; OTCQB: IMLFF), a biopharmaceutical company specializing in the research and development of novel, cannabinoid-based drug therapies, today announced the filing of an international Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) application, an important component in providing intellectual and commercial protection for INM-750 as a cannabinoid-based topical therapy for Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS). Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of inherited connective tissue diseases that share a common manifestation of extremely fragile skin that blisters or tears from friction or trauma. Internal organs and bodily systems can also be affected by EB. It results from a defect of anchoring between the dermis and epidermis caused most frequently by the dysfunction or absence of certain proteins, called keratins, in the skin. EB is an orphan disease with no known treatment and has a significant unmet medical need. INM-750 will be the first therapy developed for EB designed specifically to modulate disease activity and to alleviate symptoms. It is well documented that cannabinoid compounds have unique anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing promoting properties via several mechanisms, thus making them theoretically excellent candidates for use in alleviating some of the symptoms associated with EB. InMed's proprietary Bioinformatics Database Assessment Tool predicted a dual approach that may prove beneficial to patients: first, the ability of certain cannabinoids to play a role in addressing key disease hallmarks (wound healing, infection, pain, itch, inflammation) in patients with EB; and second, the ability of some cannabinoids to regulate the expression of various keratins that might compensate for the dysfunctional keratins that cause Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS). EBS accounts for the vast majority of EB patients. InMed conducted several in vitro and in vivo assays and the results of these studies form the basis of this PCT application. The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) is an international patent law treaty, which provides a unified procedure for filing patent applications to protect inventions in each of its member states. There are 151 member countries within the PCT worldwide, so near global patent coverage can be obtained through successful patent prosecution in the U.S., Japan, Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, China, Brazil, Russia, India, and many other countries. The original priority date for this filing was May 26, 2015, therefore coverage of any underlying patent claims would extend for 20 years until 2035 in the United States, and may be subject to patent term extensions that would enable years of additional protection. "This is a significant milestone achieved by our scientific team's discovery and validation of a new cannabinoid therapy to treat a serious disease with high unmet medical need. We are looking forward to fully understanding the potential impact of INM-750 in helping the EB community," said Dr. Sazzad Hossain, Chief Scientific Officer of InMed Pharmaceuticals. "The pre-clinical data emerging on the use of cannabinoids for EB, as well as other disease targets in our drug development portfolio, continue to validate our discovery approach using our bioinformatics assessment tool. These drug/disease targeting predictions are then followed by relatively quick, inexpensive, yet highly informative confirmatory laboratory studies to validate the predictions of the database. This approach is proving to be an important means to shorten drug development timelines as well as significantly reduce development costs." InMed is a pre-clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that specializes in developing novel therapies through the research and development into the extensive pharmacology of cannabinoids coupled with innovative drug delivery systems. InMed's proprietary bioinformatics database drug/disease targeting tool, cannabinoid biosynthesis technology and drug development pipeline are the fundamental value drivers of the Company. For more information, visit www.inmedpharma.com This news release contains "forward-looking information" and "forward-looking statements" (collectively, "forward-looking information") within the meaning of applicable securities laws. Forward-looking information is based on management's current expectations and beliefs and is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking information in this news release includes statements about the potential of cannabinoid compounds to modulate disease activity and to alleviate symptoms in EB and other diseases, the potential for this patent application to provide any intellectual property protection for InMed and the expected fundamental value drivers of the company. Although such statements are based on management's reasonable assumptions, there can be no assurance that such assumptions will prove to be correct. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from those implied by such statements. Known risk factors include, among others: InMed may not use net proceeds received from the private placement as currently contemplated and InMed's proprietary platform technology, product pipeline and accelerated development pathway may not return their expected level of value. A more complete discussion of the risks and uncertainties facing InMed is disclosed in InMed's continuous disclosure filings with Canadian securities regulatory authorities at www.sedar.com. All forward-looking information herein is qualified in its entirety by this cautionary statement, and InMed disclaims any obligation to revise or update any such forward-looking information or to publicly announce the result of any revisions to any of the forward-looking information contained herein to reflect future results, events or developments, except as required by law. NEITHER THE CANADIAN SECURITIES EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATIONS SERVICES PROVIDER HAVE REVIEWED OR ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS RELEASE.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / March 2, 2017 / InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("InMed") (CNSX: IN; OTCQB: IMLFF), a biopharmaceutical company specializing in the research and development of novel, cannabinoid-based drug therapies, today announced the filing of an international Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) application, an important component in providing intellectual and commercial protection for INM-750 as a cannabinoid-based topical therapy for Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS). Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of inherited connective tissue diseases that share a common manifestation of extremely fragile skin that blisters or tears from friction or trauma. Internal organs and bodily systems can also be affected by EB. It results from a defect of anchoring between the dermis and epidermis caused most frequently by the dysfunction or absence of certain proteins, called keratins, in the skin. EB is an orphan disease with no known treatment and has a significant unmet medical need. INM-750 will be the first therapy developed for EB designed specifically to modulate disease activity and to alleviate symptoms. It is well documented that cannabinoid compounds have unique anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing promoting properties via several mechanisms, thus making them theoretically excellent candidates for use in alleviating some of the symptoms associated with EB. InMed's proprietary Bioinformatics Database Assessment Tool predicted a dual approach that may prove beneficial to patients: first, the ability of certain cannabinoids to play a role in addressing key disease hallmarks (wound healing, infection, pain, itch, inflammation) in all patients with EB; and second, the ability of some cannabinoids to regulate the expression of various keratins that might compensate for the dysfunctional keratins that cause Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS). EBS accounts for the vast majority of EB patients. InMed conducted several in vitro and in vivo assays and the results of these studies form the basis of this PCT application. The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) is an international patent law treaty, which provides a unified procedure for filing patent applications to protect inventions in each of its member states. There are 151 member countries within the PCT worldwide, so near global patent coverage can be obtained through successful patent prosecution in the U.S., Japan, Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, China, Brazil, Russia, India, and many other countries. The original priority date for this filing was May 26, 2015, therefore coverage of any underlying patent claims would extend for 20 years until 2035 in the United States, and may be subject to patent term extensions that would enable years of additional protection. "This is a significant milestone achieved by our scientific team's discovery and validation of a new cannabinoid therapy to treat a serious disease with high unmet medical need. We are looking forward to fully understanding the potential impact of INM-750 in helping the EB community," said Dr. Sazzad Hossain, Chief Scientific Officer of InMed Pharmaceuticals. "The pre-clinical data emerging on the use of cannabinoids for EB, as well as other disease targets in our drug development portfolio, continue to validate our discovery approach using our bioinformatics assessment tool. These drug/disease targeting predictions are then followed by relatively quick, inexpensive, yet highly informative confirmatory laboratory studies to validate the predictions of the database. This approach is proving to be an important means to shorten drug development timelines as well as significantly reduce development costs." InMed is a pre-clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that specializes in developing novel therapies through the research and development into the extensive pharmacology of cannabinoids coupled with innovative drug delivery systems. InMed's proprietary bioinformatics database drug/disease targeting tool, cannabinoid biosynthesis technology and drug development pipeline are the fundamental value drivers of the Company. For more information, visit www.inmedpharma.com This news release contains "forward-looking information" and "forward-looking statements" (collectively, "forward-looking information") within the meaning of applicable securities laws. Forward-looking information is based on management's current expectations and beliefs and is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking information in this news release includes statements about the potential of cannabinoid compounds to modulate disease activity and to alleviate symptoms in EB and other diseases, the potential for this patent application to provide any intellectual property protection for InMed and the expected fundamental value drivers of the company. Although such statements are based on management's reasonable assumptions, there can be no assurance that such assumptions will prove to be correct. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from those implied by such statements. Known risk factors include, among others: InMed may not use net proceeds received from the private placement as currently contemplated and InMed's proprietary platform technology, product pipeline and accelerated development pathway may not return their expected level of value. A more complete discussion of the risks and uncertainties facing InMed is disclosed in InMed's continuous disclosure filings with Canadian securities regulatory authorities at www.sedar.com. All forward-looking information herein is qualified in its entirety by this cautionary statement, and InMed disclaims any obligation to revise or update any such forward-looking information or to publicly announce the result of any revisions to any of the forward-looking information contained herein to reflect future results, events or developments, except as required by law. NEITHER THE CANADIAN SECURITIES EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATIONS SERVICES PROVIDER HAVE REVIEWED OR ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS RELEASE. VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / March 2, 2017 / InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("InMed") (CNSX: IN; OTCQB: IMLFF), a biopharmaceutical company specializing in the research and development of novel, cannabinoid-based drug therapies, today announced the filing of an international Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) application, an important component in providing intellectual and commercial protection for INM-750 as a cannabinoid-based topical therapy for Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS). Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of inherited connective tissue diseases that share a common manifestation of extremely fragile skin that blisters or tears from friction or trauma. Internal organs and bodily systems can also be affected by EB. It results from a defect of anchoring between the dermis and epidermis caused most frequently by the dysfunction or absence of certain proteins, called keratins, in the skin. EB is an orphan disease with no known treatment and has a significant unmet medical need. INM-750 will be the first therapy developed for EB designed specifically to modulate disease activity and to alleviate symptoms. It is well documented that cannabinoid compounds have unique anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing promoting properties via several mechanisms, thus making them theoretically excellent candidates for use in alleviating some of the symptoms associated with EB. InMed's proprietary Bioinformatics Database Assessment Tool predicted a dual approach that may prove beneficial to patients: first, the ability of certain cannabinoids to play a role in addressing key disease hallmarks (wound healing, infection, pain, itch, inflammation) in all patients with EB; and second, the ability of some cannabinoids to regulate the expression of various keratins that might compensate for the dysfunctional keratins that cause Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS). EBS accounts for the vast majority of EB patients. InMed conducted several in vitro and in vivo assays and the results of these studies form the basis of this PCT application. The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) is an international patent law treaty, which provides a unified procedure for filing patent applications to protect inventions in each of its member states. There are 151 member countries within the PCT worldwide, so near global patent coverage can be obtained through successful patent prosecution in the U.S., Japan, Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, China, Brazil, Russia, India, and many other countries. The original priority date for this filing was May 26, 2015, therefore coverage of any underlying patent claims would extend for 20 years until 2035 in the United States, and may be subject to patent term extensions that would enable years of additional protection. "This is a significant milestone achieved by our scientific team's discovery and validation of a new cannabinoid therapy to treat a serious disease with high unmet medical need. We are looking forward to fully understanding the potential impact of INM-750 in helping the EB community," said Dr. Sazzad Hossain, Chief Scientific Officer of InMed Pharmaceuticals. "The pre-clinical data emerging on the use of cannabinoids for EB, as well as other disease targets in our drug development portfolio, continue to validate our discovery approach using our bioinformatics assessment tool. These drug/disease targeting predictions are then followed by relatively quick, inexpensive, yet highly informative confirmatory laboratory studies to validate the predictions of the database. This approach is proving to be an important means to shorten drug development timelines as well as significantly reduce development costs." InMed is a pre-clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that specializes in developing novel therapies through the research and development into the extensive pharmacology of cannabinoids coupled with innovative drug delivery systems. InMed's proprietary bioinformatics database drug/disease targeting tool, cannabinoid biosynthesis technology and drug development pipeline are the fundamental value drivers of the Company. For more information, visit www.inmedpharma.com This news release contains "forward-looking information" and "forward-looking statements" (collectively, "forward-looking information") within the meaning of applicable securities laws. Forward-looking information is based on management's current expectations and beliefs and is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking information in this news release includes statements about the potential of cannabinoid compounds to modulate disease activity and to alleviate symptoms in EB and other diseases, the potential for this patent application to provide any intellectual property protection for InMed and the expected fundamental value drivers of the company. Although such statements are based on management's reasonable assumptions, there can be no assurance that such assumptions will prove to be correct. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from those implied by such statements. Known risk factors include, among others: InMed may not use net proceeds received from the private placement as currently contemplated and InMed's proprietary platform technology, product pipeline and accelerated development pathway may not return their expected level of value. A more complete discussion of the risks and uncertainties facing InMed is disclosed in InMed's continuous disclosure filings with Canadian securities regulatory authorities at www.sedar.com. All forward-looking information herein is qualified in its entirety by this cautionary statement, and InMed disclaims any obligation to revise or update any such forward-looking information or to publicly announce the result of any revisions to any of the forward-looking information contained herein to reflect future results, events or developments, except as required by law. NEITHER THE CANADIAN SECURITIES EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATIONS SERVICES PROVIDER HAVE REVIEWED OR ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS RELEASE.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Chances are that children who eat excessive amounts of fatty foods will not only become obese, but will develop cognitive and psychiatric problems when they are older. This is because, according to a recent study, diets rich in fat deplete the levels of a key protein known to help synapses in the brain to work properly. In turn, this leads to a dip in several forms of cognitive functions, such as behavioral flexibility and memory. "These changes from a young age onwards are more the result of the fatty foods themselves, and the impact they have on young brains, rather than arising from the mere fact of being obese," notes Urs Meyer from ETH Zurich in Switzerland in Springer Nature's journal Molecular Psychiatry. Together with Pascale Chavis from the INMED Institute in Marseille in France, they co-directed the first study providing molecular mechanisms for how high-fat diets during adolescence negatively affect normal brain functioning and cognition. The researchers conducted a study in mice, and observed cognitive defects as early as four weeks after the mice were fed high-fat foods. These were evident even before the animals started gaining weight and appeared specifically in mice fed high-fat foods during adolescence, and not in mice fed the same diets during adulthood. In order to get at the mechanisms underlying such observations, the authors focused on a frontal region in the brain known as the prefrontal cortex. In humans, the prefontal cortex is associated with the planning of complex actions and decision making, expressing one's personality and controlling one's social behavior. Several human studies had shown how fat-rich diets can reduce performance on executive tasks such as problem solving and working memory, in particular in adolescents. This seems worrying in light of a marked drop in the quality of diets over the past few decades and the poor understanding of the impact these diets have on our neurons. These effects might be particularly relevant for adolescents, according to the study authors, as adolescence is a key period of increased caloric needs and heightened appetite for young people. It is the time when they start making more choices themselves about what to eat. Adolescents eating high-fat diets may also be prone to cognitive deficits due to the immature character of the prefrontal cortex during this time frame. "This brain region is very interesting," notes French INSERM investigator Chavis, "because, unlike the rest of the brain, it is not fully developed until early adulthood." Researchers believe this relative immaturity makes the prefrontal cortex very sensitive to suboptimal experiences occurring during adolescence such as trauma, excessive stress or drug abuse. "Our study highlights that the quality of the food eaten by teenagers may also be particularly important for an optimal maturation of the prefrontal cortex," says Marie Labouesse, lead author of the study. "We think this adolescent vulnerability to high-fat foods might be due to the hypersensitivity of a protein known as reelin," notes Labouesse. The researchers saw that the prefrontal cortex of mice fed high-fat foods had fewer neurons expressing reelin and this only happened when the diets were fed during the adolescent period. The authors then zoomed in, looking at synapses, those small microscopic structures that allow neurons to communicate between each other. The reelin protein is known to regulate synaptic function, and in particular synaptic plasticity, i.e. the ability of synapses to become stronger or weaker in response to a change in brain activity. "We saw that plasticity in the prefrontal cortex was impaired in animals fed high-fat foods during adolescence; and quite remarkably we then observed that when restoring reelin levels, both synaptic plasticity and cognitive functions went back to normal," notes Chavis. "Our findings that high-fat diets during adolescence disrupt functioning of the adult prefrontal cortex suggest that a careful nutritional balance during this sensitive period is pivotal for reaching the full capacity of adult prefrontal functions," says Labouesse. "Although we still need to find out the exact mechanisms by which reelin neurons get depleted during adolescence, it looks like high-fat foods could kick-start changes in how the prefrontal cortex of younger people develops." These findings may help explain how unhealthy foods and obesity are increasingly linked to the development of neuropsychiatric and neurological conditions. Reelin deficiency is also a feature repeatedly documented in brain disorders such as schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. "Although more studies on this topic are definitely needed," warns Meyer, "high-fat diets could potentially exacerbate the reelin and synaptic deficits in patients with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease or even aggravate cognitive anomalies." "Reelin is now established as being a key player in the regulation of normal brain functions. The fact that the reelin protein displays vulnerability towards the negative effects of unhealthy foods is fascinating from the scientific perspective, but also very worrying when we think of the potential impact this might have for human health," concludes Chavis.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Chances are that children who eat excessive amounts of fatty foods will not only become obese, but will develop cognitive and psychiatric problems when they are older. This is because, according to a recent study, diets rich in fat deplete the levels of a key protein known to help synapses in the brain to work properly. In turn, this leads to a dip in several forms of cognitive functions, such as behavioral flexibility and memory. "These changes from a young age onwards are more the result of the fatty foods themselves, and the impact they have on young brains, rather than arising from the mere fact of being obese," notes Urs Meyer from ETH Zurich in Switzerland in Springer Nature's journal Molecular Psychiatry. Together with Pascale Chavis from the INMED Institute in Marseille in France, they co-directed the first study providing molecular mechanisms for how high-fat diets during adolescence negatively affect normal brain functioning and cognition. The researchers conducted a study in mice, and observed cognitive defects as early as four weeks after the mice were fed high-fat foods. These were evident even before the animals started gaining weight and appeared specifically in mice fed high-fat foods during adolescence, and not in mice fed the same diets during adulthood. In order to get at the mechanisms underlying such observations, the authors focused on a frontal region in the brain known as the prefrontal cortex. In humans, the prefontal cortex is associated with the planning of complex actions and decision making, expressing one's personality and controlling one's social behavior. Several human studies had shown how fat-rich diets can reduce performance on executive tasks such as problem solving and working memory, in particular in adolescents. This seems worrying in light of a marked drop in the quality of diets over the past few decades and the poor understanding of the impact these diets have on our neurons. These effects might be particularly relevant for adolescents, according to the study authors, as adolescence is a key period of increased caloric needs and heightened appetite for young people. It is the time when they start making more choices themselves about what to eat. Adolescents eating high-fat diets may also be prone to cognitive deficits due to the immature character of the prefrontal cortex during this time frame. "This brain region is very interesting," notes French INSERM investigator Chavis, "because, unlike the rest of the brain, it is not fully developed until early adulthood." Researchers believe this relative immaturity makes the prefrontal cortex very sensitive to suboptimal experiences occurring during adolescence such as trauma, excessive stress or drug abuse. "Our study highlights that the quality of the food eaten by teenagers may also be particularly important for an optimal maturation of the prefrontal cortex," says Marie Labouesse, lead author of the study. "We think this adolescent vulnerability to high-fat foods might be due to the hypersensitivity of a protein known as reelin," notes Labouesse. The researchers saw that the prefrontal cortex of mice fed high-fat foods had fewer neurons expressing reelin and this only happened when the diets were fed during the adolescent period. The authors then zoomed in, looking at synapses, those small microscopic structures that allow neurons to communicate between each other. The reelin protein is known to regulate synaptic function, and in particular synaptic plasticity, i.e. the ability of synapses to become stronger or weaker in response to a change in brain activity. "We saw that plasticity in the prefrontal cortex was impaired in animals fed high-fat foods during adolescence; and quite remarkably we then observed that when restoring reelin levels, both synaptic plasticity and cognitive functions went back to normal," notes Chavis. "Our findings that high-fat diets during adolescence disrupt functioning of the adult prefrontal cortex suggest that a careful nutritional balance during this sensitive period is pivotal for reaching the full capacity of adult prefrontal functions," says Labouesse. "Although we still need to find out the exact mechanisms by which reelin neurons get depleted during adolescence, it looks like high-fat foods could kick-start changes in how the prefrontal cortex of younger people develops." These findings may help explain how unhealthy foods and obesity are increasingly linked to the development of neuropsychiatric and neurological conditions. Reelin deficiency is also a feature repeatedly documented in brain disorders such as schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. "Although more studies on this topic are definitely needed", warns Meyer, "high-fat diets could potentially exacerbate the reelin and synaptic deficits in patients with mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease or even aggravate cognitive anomalies." "Reelin is now established as being a key player in the regulation of normal brain functions. The fact that the reelin protein displays vulnerability towards the negative effects of unhealthy foods is fascinating from the scientific perspective, but also very worrying when we think of the potential impact this might have for human health," concludes Chavis. Reference: Labouesse, M.A. et al (2016). Hypervulnerability of the adolescent prefrontal cortex to nutritional stress via reelin deficiency, Molecular Psychiatry. DOI 10.1038/mp.2016.193


Hadjikhani N.,Biomedical Imaging Center | Hadjikhani N.,Gillberg Neuropsychiatric Center | Zurcher N.R.,Biomedical Imaging Center | Rogier O.,Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne | And 4 more authors.
Autism | Year: 2015

Clinical observations have shown that GABA-acting benzodiazepines exert paradoxical excitatory effects in autism, suggesting elevated intracellular chloride (Cl-)i and excitatory action of GABA. In a previous double-blind randomized study, we have shown that the diuretic NKCC1 chloride importer antagonist bumetanide, that decreases (Cl-)i and reinforces GABAergic inhibition, reduces the severity of autism symptoms. Here, we report results from an open-label trial pilot study in which we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological testing to determine the effects of 10 months bumetanide treatment in adolescents and young adults with autism. We show that bumetanide treatment improves emotion recognition and enhances the activation of brain regions involved in social and emotional perception during the perception of emotional faces. The improvement of emotion processing by bumetanide reinforces the usefulness of bumetanide as a promising treatment to improve social interactions in autism. © The Author(s) 2013.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

CSE: INOTCQB: IMLFF VANCOUVER, Feb. 27, 2017 /PRNewswire/ - InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("InMed") (CSE: IN; OTCQB: IMLFF), reported today that prior to their expiry on Friday, February 24, 2017 a total of 10,672,750 common share purchase warrants have been exercised at a price of...


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

VANCOUVER, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - InMed Pharmaceuticals Inc. ("InMed" or "the Company") (CSE: IN; OTCQB: IMLFF), a biopharmaceutical company specializing in the research and development of novel, cannabinoid-based therapies combined with innovative drug delivery systems, announced...


CSE: IN OTCQB: IMLFF VANCOUVER, Oct. 31, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - InMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("InMed") (CSE: IN; OTCQB: IMLFF), today announced the appointment of Alexandra D.J. Mancini, M.Sc., as Senior Vice President, Clinical and Regulatory Affairs. "Ms. Mancini has over 30 years'...

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