Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute

Bandar-e Anzalī, Iran

Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute

Bandar-e Anzalī, Iran
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Ghaninejad D.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute | Abdolmalaki S.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute | Kuliyev Z.M.,Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences
Iranian Journal of Fisheries Sciences | Year: 2010

The paper focuses on some of the biological characteristics of the golden grey mullet, Liza aurata in the Iranian waters of the Caspian Sea. Samples of commercial catch of mullet obtained by means of beach seine fishing cooperatives along the Iranian coasts of the Caspian Sea (2007-2008) as monthly interval. Samples were subjected to biometric measurement to specify their biological characteristics. The male/female ratio in the present study was 1:1.22 which deviated significantly from 1:1 common sex ratio (X2=7.7, Sig, level=0.006). During this study, the peak of the spawning time for the golden grey mullet occurred in October in waters off- Gilan shore whereas it occurred in November off Mazandaran and Golestan provinces. The highest Gonado-Somatic Index (GSI) was found to occur during late September and October which declined to its lowest level in November and December and remained relatively stable during January to April. Therefore, spawning of L. aurata started earlier in Gilan and ended later in Golestan Province. The average absolute fecundity of the golden grey mullet was 700881± 429987 (± SD) eggs with a range of 200112 to 2282862 eggs. The length of females at 50% sexual maturity of the golden grey mullet was estimated 28.4 cm.


Mansouri B.,Birjand University | Pourkhabbaz A.,Birjand University | Ebrahimpour M.,Birjand University | Babaei H.,Inland water Aquaculture Research Institute | Hamidian A.H.,University of Tehran
Chemical Speciation and Bioavailability | Year: 2013

The objective of the present study was to investigate the pattern of accumulation and elimination of cobalt in selected organs of Capoeta fusca, after chronic exposure. Samples of C. fusca were obtained from a qanat in Birjand between July and September 2010. Cobalt accumulation was studied in fish exposed to 6.8 mg L-1 of cobalt for 15 days and the elimination was investigated in the contaminated fish samples placed in tap water for another 15 days. Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry it was found that the accumulation of cobalt in tissues was in the following order: liver>muscle>gill>skin. The elimination of cobalt was in the following order: skin>gill>muscle>liver. The bioaccumulation and elimination of cobalt were significant in the organs of C. fusca (P<0.01). The accumulation of cobalt in C. fusca was rapid and increased with an increase in metal concentration in water and the duration of exposure. The results of the present study showed that the accumulation and elimination of cobalt in C. fusca depend on the type of organs and the duration of exposure.


Naji A.,Hormozgan University | Sohrabi T.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute
Chemical Speciation and Bioavailability | Year: 2015

This study concentrates on the speciation and distribution patterns of some heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cd, Zn, and Cu) in surface sediments in the southern part of the Caspian Sea, the biggest lake in the world, to obtain an overall classification for the origins of metals in the area using a sequential extraction technique. At all sampling stations, Pb, Ni, Zn, and Cu were mostly (>50%) accumulated in the resistant fraction, which indicated that there were no significant anthropogenic inputs of Pb, Ni, Zn, and Cu into the surface sediments of the south Caspian Sea. Guilan province on the west coast of Caspian Sea accumulated higher percentages of non-resistant fractions of Pb and Zn, while Mazandaran and Golestan provinces in the middle and western parts of the Caspian Sea, in the Iranian zone, accumulated higher percentages of non-resistant fractions of Ni and Cu. The present study revealed that the coastal area of the south Caspian Sea is still not seriously contaminated. Cadmium in Guilan and Golestan provinces were dominated by non-resistant fractions (55–69%), which indicated more anthropogenic inputs of Cd on the south coast of the Caspian Sea in comparison with other metals. © 2015 The Author(s).


Naji A.,Hormozgan University | Ismail A.,University Putra Malaysia | Kamrani E.,Hormozgan University | Sohrabi T.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology | Year: 2014

Metallothionein (MT) concentrations in gill and liver tissues of Oreochromis mossambicus were determined to assess biological response of fish to levels of some metals. Metal concentrations in gill and liver tissues of O. mossambicus ranged from 0.6 to 2.6 for Cd, 16 to 52 for Zn, 0.5 to 17 for Cu and 2 to 67 for T-Hg (all in μg/g wet weight, except for T-Hg in ng/g wet weight). Accumulation of Cd, Zn, Cu and Hg (μg/g wet weight) in the liver and gills of O. mossambicus were in the order of liver>gills. The concentrations of Cd, Zn, Cu and Hg in fish tissues were correlated with MT content. The increases in MT levels from the reference area Puchong Tengah compared to the polluted area Kampung Seri Kenangan were 3.4-And 3.8-fold for gills and livers, respectively. The results indicate that MT concentrations were tissue-specific, with the highest levels in the liver. Therefore, the liver can act as a tissue indicator in O. mossambicus in the study area. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014.


Mansouri B.,Islamic Azad University at Kermānshāh | Babaei H.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute | Hoshyari E.,Birjand University | Khodaparast S.H.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute | Mirzajani A.,Birjand University
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology | Year: 2012

The objective of the present study was to investigate the levels of heavy metals, namely, chromium, copper, cobalt, nickel, and iron, in Western Reef heron (Egretta gularis) (n = 15) and Siberian gull (Larus heuglini) (n = 15) to (1) compare metal concentrations between two bird species with different trophic level,molting pattern, and life strategy; (2) examine species-And sexrelated variations in trace-metal accumulation; and (3) determine the significance between heavy-metal concentrations in kidney, liver, and pectoralmuscle. Bird samples were collected from November to December 2010 throughout the Hara Biosphere Reserve, and heavy metals were assayed by using a Shimadzu AA 680 flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer; the results were given as μg/g dry weight. Metal concentrations were different between the bird species as well as among bird tissues, but there was no difference (except chromium and iron in kidney) between sex (male vs. female). Mean levels in kidney of Western Reef heron and Siberian gull were chromium (0.96, 2.32 μg/g), copper (6.31, 10.55 μg/g), cobalt (0.12, 0.14 μg/g), nickel (1.13, 1.32 μg/g), and iron (37.92, 39.64 μg/g), respectively, whereas in liver they were chromium (1.05, 2.75 μg/g), copper (8.93, 12.63 μg/g), cobalt (0.09, 0.17 μg/g), nickel (1.1, 2.27 μg/g), and iron (34.03, 44.21 μg/g), respectively. Results showed that heavy-metal concentrations in Western Reef heron were decreased in the sequence iron > copper > nickel > chromium > cobalt, whereas in Siberian gull they were decreased in the sequence iron > copper > chromium > nickel > cobalt. Results also showed that in both species, the highest chromium and nickel concentrations were measured in female birds and the lowest in male birds, whereas the highest copper, cobalt, and iron (except iron in liver) concentrations were measured in male birds and the lowest in female birds. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.


Mansouri B.,Islamic Azad University at Kermānshāh | Babaei H.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute | Hoshyari E.,Birjand University
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment | Year: 2012

The main objectives of article were monitor the metal concentrations of cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, cobalt, and iron, in the feather of shorebirds species, Western Reef Heron (Egretta gularis) and Siberian Gull (Larus heuglini) from Hara Biosphere Reserve of Southern Iran; and identify any relationships between species. Assaying heavy metals by using Shimadzu AA 680 flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer, the results were given as micrograms per gram dry weight. The concentrations of heavy metal were found to follow the order of iron>zinc>copper>lead>cadmium>cobalt for E. gularis and of iron>zinc>lead>copper>cadmium>cobalt for L. heuglini. Also, they showed that the cadmium, copper, and cobalt concentrations were higher in females than in the males, while the lead concentration for E. gularis and L. heuglini was higher in males. The cadmium concentration means they were measured as1.16 and 1.37 μg/g for E. gularis and L. heuglini, respectively, whereas the lead concentration means 7.04 and 5.48 μg/g for E. gularis and L. heuglini, respectively. The concentrations of nonessential trace elements in E. gularis and L. heuglini were generally comparable to values reported in other studies. The average levels of lead we observed in these birds were greater than 5 μg/g dry weight in the feather that is known to be associated with adverse behavioral or reproductive effects. Data analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between copper and zinc (P<0.01), copper and cobalt (P<0.05). © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012.


Mansouri B.,Birjand University | Ebrahimpour M.,Birjand University | Babaei H.,Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute
Toxicology and Industrial Health | Year: 2012

Since toxicity is based on the effect that a toxicant produces at a target site within an organism, establishing the relationship between the concentration of substance at the target site and the subsequent toxic effect can provide a tool for predicting toxicity. This article aims to investigate the patterns of bioaccumulation and elimination of nickel in the selected organs of black fish (Capoetafusca) exposed to two treatments of nickel (4.5 and 12.7 mg/L) for a period of 30 days. Nickel was assayed using Shimadzu AA 680 atomic absorption spectrophotometer, and the results were given as μg/g wet weight. This finding showed that the accumulation patterns of nickel, for lower sub-lethal (LSL) and higher sub-lethal (HSL) concentrations of nickel, are in the following order: gill > liver > muscle > skin. The elimination patterns of nickel are in the following order: gill > skin > muscle > liver, for LSL concentration, and gill > skin > liver > muscle, for HSL concentration of nickel. The results show that the target organ for accumulation and elimination of nickel is gill. © 2011 The Author(s).


Mansouri B.,Birjand University | Ebrahimpour M.,Birjand University | Pourkhabbaz A.,Birjand University | Babaei H.,Inland water Aquaculture Research Institute | Farhangfar H.,Birjand University
Journal of Animal and Plant Sciences | Year: 2012

The objective of the present study was to investigate the pattern of accumulation and elimination of cobalt on selected organs of Capoeta fusca, after chronic exposure. During July to September 2010, C. fousca was obtained from qanat in Birjand. Cobalt accumulation and elimination were studied in fish exposed to one- thirty of LC50 taken as 6.8 mg/L of 96 hr LC50 concentration of cobalt over 30 days of exposure. The cobalt was assayed using Shimadzu AA 680 atomic absorption spectrophotometery and the results were given as μg/g wet wt (from fish). This finding showed that the accumulation patterns of cobalt are in the following order: liver>muscle>gill>skin. The elimination patterns of cobalt are in the following order: skin>gill>muscle>liver. The bioaccumulation and elimination of cobalt was significantly increased in the organs of C. fusca (p<0.01). The accumulation of cobalt in C. fusca was observed to be rapid and bioaccumulation increasing metal concentration in the water and with exposure time. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that the accumulation and elimination of cobalt in C. fusca is dependent on organ and time.

Loading Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute collaborators
Loading Inland Water Aquaculture Research Institute collaborators