Inland Fisheries Service

New Norfolk, Australia

Inland Fisheries Service

New Norfolk, Australia

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Chilcott S.,Inland Fisheries Service | Chilcott S.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Freeman R.,Inland Fisheries Service | Davies P.E.,Inland Fisheries Service | And 8 more authors.
Marine and Freshwater Research | Year: 2013

The Pedder galaxias (Galaxias pedderensis) from Lake Pedder, Tasmania, Australia, is one of the world's most threatened freshwater fish. The flooding of Lake Pedder in 1972 for hydroelectric power generation caused a major change to the ecosystem that initiated an irreversible decline in the Pedder galaxias within its natural range. The flooding inundated another headwater catchment and native and introduced fish from this catchment colonised the impoundment. Numbers of the Pedder galaxias declined markedly as the impoundment matured and as colonising fish proliferated. Surveys in the 1980s confirmed the parlous state of the population, highlighting the need for conservation intervention. Several urgent conservation actions were undertaken to save the species from extinction. Translocation was considered the most important recovery action, given the critically low numbers in the wild. The species is now extinct from its natural range and is known from only two translocated populations. The conservation program, and specifically the translocation recovery action, saved the Pedder galaxias from extinction. The conservation management was extremely challenging since rapidly declining fish numbers needed timely and critical decisions to underpin the future of the fish. Recommendations are provided arising from this case study to guide conservation of freshwater fish in similar circumstances. Journal compilation © CSIRO 2013.


Barnett A.,Deakin University | Barnett A.,James Cook University | Yick J.L.,Inland Fisheries Service | Abrantes K.G.,James Cook University | And 2 more authors.
Marine Ecology Progress Series | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: Trophic studies are key components in animal ecology and fisheries research. Although stomach samples are often obtained from fisheries, diet studies that consider the influence of fisheries on dietary results are still lacking. Here, the diet of the draughtboard shark Cephaloscyllium laticeps, an abundant mesopredator in Tasmanian waters, was investigated. Stomach samples were obtained from gillnet and craypot fisheries sourced from 4 regions: central (100% gillnet), east coast (63% gillnet, 37% craypot), northwest (100% gillnet), and southwest Tasmania (100% craypot). Overall, C. laticeps consumed the same prey types in all regions, but the importance of some prey varied significantly between regions. Generalized linear models showed that region was the main factor affecting prey abundance in the diet. Fishing method had some influence on the abundance of some prey (crabs, octopus, and other molluscs (gastropods and bivalves)), but the effect of fishing method on pot-related species such as Jasus edwardsii (lobster) and octopus was not as prevalent as expected. The common occurrence of C. laticeps as a bycatch species and its high consumption of targeted fishery species (lobsters and octopus) indicates that C. laticeps has a strong interaction with the fisheries. Therefore, the relationship between these fishery species and C. laticeps should be considered in food web studies in Tasmanian waters.© Inter-Research 2013. www.int-res.com.

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