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Ortega-Alvarez R.,Iniciativa para la Conservacion de las Aves de America del Norte Mexico NABCI Mexico | Calderon-Parra R.,Iniciativa para la Conservacion de las Aves de America del Norte Mexico NABCI Mexico
Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia | Year: 2014

Many wildlife species have modified their behaviors in order to thrive within cities. Since the 1980’s, Harris’s Hawk has become a regular resident species in Mexico City, Mexico. Here, we report on what may be an urban adaptation - two Harris’s Hawks hunting bats in urban, southern Mexico City. This represents the first formal record of Harris’s Hawk preying on bats, either within anthropogenic or natural ecosystems. Cities might facilitate access to novel food resources for particular sorts of species, including urban adaptable ones such as the Harris’s Hawk. © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Ornitologia. All rights reserved.


Ortega-Alvarez R.,Iniciativa para la Conservacion de las Aves de America del Norte Mexico NABCI Mexico | Sanchez-Gonzalez L.A.,Iniciativa para la Conservacion de las Aves de America del Norte Mexico NABCI Mexico | Sanchez-Gonzalez L.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Rodriguez-Contreras V.,Iniciativa para la Conservacion de las Aves de America del Norte Mexico NABCI Mexico | And 3 more authors.
Sustainability | Year: 2012

Biological monitoring is a powerful tool for understanding ecological patterns and processes, implementing sound management practices, and determining wildlife conservation strategies. In Mexico, regional long-term bird monitoring has been undertaken only over the last decade. Two comprehensive programs have incorporated bird monitoring as the main tool for assessing the impact of human productive activities on birds and habitats at local and regional levels: the Integrated Ecosystem Management (IEM) and the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor Mexico (CBMM). These programs are implemented in supremely important biodiverse regions in the southern and southeastern states of Mexico. Bird monitoring activities are based on the recruitment and participation of local people linked to sustainable productive projects promoted by the CBMM or IEM. Through a series of training workshops delivered by specialists, local monitors receive equipment and coordinate to become part of a large monitoring network that facilitates regional covertures. This data currently being obtained by local people will enable the mid- and long-term assessment of the impacts of sustainable human productive activities on birds and biodiversity. Community-based bird monitoring programs are a promising opportunity for enhancing scientific knowledge, improving sustainable practices, and supporting wildlife conservation in areas of high biodiversity. © 2012 by the authors.

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