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Bagali P.G.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Prabhu A.H.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Raghavendra K.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Hittalmani S.,University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore | Vadivelu J.S.,University of Malaya
Asia-Pacific Journal of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology | Year: 2010

In Plant sciences, the advent of recombinant DNA technology and PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) have opened up new avenues and opportunities for the application of molecular markers in the diversified field of research and scientific investigations. Important molecular markers that have been extensively used in the plant tissue culture are RFLP, RAPD, AFLP, SSR or Sequence Tagged Microsatellite Sites (STMS), Sequence Tagged Sites (STS), DNA Amplification Fingerprinting (DAF) and Microsatellite Primed-PCR (MP-PCR). Primary application of molecular markers is in testing the genetic fidelity during micropropagation/ex situ conservation and characterization of plant genetic resources. This has been used in the commercial scale micropropagation of elite genotypes and in insitu and exsitu conservation of plant genetic resources (PGRs). In this review we have highlighted the application of molecular markers in the tissue culture.


Lye S.-H.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Chahil J.K.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Bagali P.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Alex L.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by elevations in total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc). Development of FH can result in the increase of risk for premature cardiovascular diseases (CVD). FH is primarily caused by genetic variations in Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR), Apolipoprotein B (APOB) or Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes. Although FH has been extensively studied in the Caucasian population, there are limited reports of FH mutations in the Asian population. We investigated the association of previously reported genetic variants that are involved in lipid regulation in our study cohort. A total of 1536 polymorphisms previously implicated in FH were evaluated in 141 consecutive patients with clinical FH (defined by the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network criteria) and 111 unrelated control subjects without FH using high throughput microarray genotyping platform. Fourteen Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were found to be significantly associated with FH, eleven with increased FH risk and three with decreased FH risk. Of the eleven SNPs associated with an increased risk of FH, only one SNP was found in the LDLR gene, seven in the APOB gene and three in the PCSK9 gene. SNP rs12720762 in APOB gene is associated with the highest risk of FH (odds ratio 14.78, p<0.001). Amongst the FH cases, 108 out of 141 (76.60%) have had at least one significant risk-associated SNP. Our study adds new information and knowledge on the genetic polymorphisms amongst Asians with FH, which may serve as potential markers in risk prediction and disease management. © 2013 Lye et al.


Alex L.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Chahil J.K.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Lye S.H.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Bagali P.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Ler L.W.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies
Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2012

Hypercholesterolemia is caused by different interactions of lifestyle and genetic determinants. At the genetic level, it can be attributed to the interactions of multiple polymorphisms, or as in the example of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), it can be the result of a single mutation. A large number of genetic markers, mostly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or mutations in three genes, implicated in autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), viz APOB (apolipoprotein B), LDLR (low density lipoprotein receptor) and PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9), have been identified and characterized. However, such studies have been insufficiently undertaken specifically in Malaysia and Southeast Asia in general. The main objective of this study was to identify ADH variants, specifically ADH-causing mutations and hypercholesterolemia-associated polymorphisms in multiethnic Malaysian population. We aimed to evaluate published SNPs in ADH causing genes, in this population and to report any unusual trends. We examined a large number of selected SNPs from previous studies of APOB, LDLR, PCSK9 and other genes, in clinically diagnosed ADH patients (n=141) and healthy control subjects (n=111). Selection of SNPs was initiated by searching within genes reported to be associated with ADH from known databases. The important finding was 137 mono-allelic markers (44.1%) and 173 polymorphic markers (55.8%) in both subject groups. By comparing to publicly available data, out of the 137 mono-allelic markers, 23 markers showed significant differences in allele frequency among Malaysians, European Whites, Han Chinese, Yoruba and Gujarati Indians. Our data can serve as reference for others in related fields of study during the planning of their experiments. © 2012 The Japan Society of Human Genetics All rights reserved.


Chahil J.K.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Lye S.H.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Bagali P.G.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Alex L.,INFOVALLEY Group of Companies
Molecular Biology Reports | Year: 2012

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a disease implicated with defects in either, Low density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR), Apolipoprotein B-100 gene (APOB), the Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 gene (PCSK9) or other related genes of the lipid metabolism pathway. The general characterization of heterozygous FH is by elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and early-onset cardiovascular diseases, while the more severe type, the homozygous FH results in extreme elevated levels of LDL cholesterol and usually death of an affected individual by early twenties. We present here a novel non-synonymous, missense mutation in exon 14 of the LDLR gene in two siblings of the Malay ethnicity discovered during an in-house genetic test. We postulate that their elevated cholesterol is due to this novel mutation and they are positive for homozygous FH. This is the first report of a C711Y mutation in patients with elevated cholesterol in Asia. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


PubMed | INFOVALLEY Group of Companies
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Molecular biology reports | Year: 2012

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a disease implicated with defects in either, Low density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR), Apolipoprotein B-100 gene (APOB), the Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 gene (PCSK9) or other related genes of the lipid metabolism pathway. The general characterization of heterozygous FH is by elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and early-onset cardiovascular diseases, while the more severe type, the homozygous FH results in extreme elevated levels of LDL cholesterol and usually death of an affected individual by early twenties. We present here a novel non-synonymous, missense mutation in exon 14 of the LDLR gene in two siblings of the Malay ethnicity discovered during an in-house genetic test. We postulate that their elevated cholesterol is due to this novel mutation and they are positive for homozygous FH. This is the first report of a C711Y mutation in patients with elevated cholesterol in Asia.


INFOVALLEY Group of Companies | Entity website

iGENE Sdn. Bhd and INFOVALLEY Life Sciences Sdn ...


IT HAS long been the story that every year a batch of fresh graduates embarks on the journey of a new career. However, these days, more and more are opting out of that traditional move and opting to be entrepreneurs. This can partly be attributed to a more conducive ecosystem that provides young entrepreneurs with financial assistance, technical support, mobile technology and connectivity to start and grow their own companies. Recognising their importance in helping to generate economic growth, the government has taken a keen interest in developing young entrepreneurs. Various agencies and programmes were established and allocations set aside to aid entrepreneurs this year. These include the 1Malaysia Entrepreneurs (1MeT) programme to expose youth to entrepreneurship and the Malaysian Global Innovation and Creativity Centre (MaGIC), a one-stop centre to empower entrepreneurs. Additionally, RM50mil was allocated under Budget 2014 for the Graduate Entrepreneurship Fund to encourage graduates to venture into entrepreneurship. The government efforts will continue in the coming year, with allocations set aside to assist entrepreneurs through loans and aid to equip and upgrade themselves so as to become more competitive. Aside from getting support from policymakers, young businessmen are also receiving much attention from the private sector. Take, for example, Alliance Bank’s Young Entrepreneurs’ Conference, which aims to engage young business owners by providing a platform for them to learn and network through its programmes. Investors are also actively seeking out new entities with dynamic personalities and innovative ideas to invest in as an alternative growth strategy. But, the trend is not just exclusive to Malaysia. It is unfolding in many other places as young people find their own way around rising unemployment rates among graduates. With more of today’s young people foregoing nine-to-five jobs to build their own businesses, more than a few have appeared in the pages of Metrobiz over the past 12 months. As the year draws to a close, we take a look back at of the young entrepreneurs that are becoming the face of Malaysian SMEs. Some people learn by using things, others by building them. At 32, Pulsar UAV Sdn Bhd founder and chief executive officer Mohd Izmir Yamin falls into the latter category. The former project engineer with an aerospace company started a company that uses unmanned aerial vehicles as a platform for data acquisition, measurement, analytics and reporting solutions for the private sector. Izmir said the work of his company gives the telecommunications industry the information needed to best position their telecommunications towers. “Without it, the surveyors have to climb trees and do an estimation instead,” he said. The company does everything from design and manufacturing of the drone prototype to writing the applications and software needed to control the drones. And Izmir is eyeing wider usage of the technology in the plantation industry where drones can be used to detect diseased crops via infrared sensors. When Merlin Chong could not find a suitable working space for her growing business, she decided the best way to beat the problem was to start her own work space. That was how the 29-year-old founded The Entrepreneur’s Lab, a co-working space that she believes will appeal to young entrepreneurs. But providing a place for entrepreneurs to gather and work is not all Chong hopes The Entrepreneur’s Lab will do. With more entrepreneurs coming into the market, she is looking at providing a space for like-minded people to collaborate and access a network of services. Chong is also looking at offering seminars and workshops that will benefit the entrepreneur community. Fighting the cause of entrepreneurs is something close to Chong’s heart and she has plans for another two branches of The Entrepreneur’s Lab over the next two years to continue supporting the community. Infovalley Group of Companies chief executive officer Mathavan A. Chandran has always been intrigued by how digital technology can create a totally new way for how work is done. He started the company when he was 33. More than 10 years into the business, he has led the company through raising one of the largest rounds of venture capital funding in the country for its subsidiary iGene Sdn Bhd, and the development of the digital autopsy facilities (DAF) in Malaysia and the UK. The company recently saw its third DAF commissioned in the Sandwell Valley Crematorium in the UK after launching the second DAF at Bradford Public Mortuary in the middle of this year. The new launch is part of a network of 18 DAFs in the UK. Freestyle football is taken seriously by few Malaysians. It is, after all, considered more of a pastime for the young. But Patrick Tee and Saw Cheng Pheng, both 24, are looking at it as more than a niche activity and have turned it into the basis for their business PCFreestyle. PCfreestyle is a two-man freestyle football team that manages and offers their own talent at events and commercials. It was a big decision for Tee and Saw, who played football as a hobby back in secondary school, to leave their full-time jobs to venture into business earlier this year. They started PCfreestyle before the World Cup. Their savvy timing and hard work saw them performing at more than 30 events and managed to earn about RM90,000 in just the three months leading up to the mother of all football events this year. Sisters, Izzati and Atiqah Khairudin, of AKA Balloon Sdn Bhd were pushed to the forefront following their father’s sudden passing in December 2012. AKA, the organiser of the annual Putrajaya International Hot Air Balloon Fiesta, provides rental of hot air balloons. Continuing their father’s legacy, who was an avid balloonist, the sisters carried on the family business and persevered to pull off subsequent hot air balloon festivals while growing the company. The young team at AKA also has plans to start a training school to groom more Malaysian balloonists. Izzati said her father’s dream was to host a hot air balloon festival with Malaysian balloonists rather than just invited participants from other countries. “We enjoy what we are doing so we want to inspire young people to also chase their passion and give them a platform to do that,” she said.


News Article | March 17, 2015
Site: www.digitalnewsasia.com

THE upcoming Cradle Buzz conference from March 19-21 will attempt to answer not only the three key concerns all startups have – market access opportunities, talent challenges and funding – but through the participation of entrepreneurs from throughout Asean, will prove to be an excellent opportunity to forge collaborations across the region.   “While our goal is to instill Malaysian entrepreneurs with the knowhow to bring their ventures to the regional market, we are opening up and welcoming the Asean entrepreneur community to be part of the vital equation here at Cradle Buzz,” says Hazel Hassan (pic above), vice president of marketing and strategic partnerships at Cradle Fund Sdn Bhd, the Ministry of Finance agency organising the event.   The ambition is to eventually position the event as the conduit to future regional collaborations. Indeed, Hazel emphasises, “We would like for Cradle Buzz to be a place for all entrepreneurs to find new regional partners.”   With that ambition achieved, Malaysian entrepreneurs will naturally have greater confidence in bringing their business to the regional level, with more collaboration between them and partners across the Asean (Association of South-East Asian Nations) region.   Asean startups which attend will also get a better understanding of what the entrepreneurial ecosystem is like in Malaysia, and hopefully bring back some lessons to their home countries.   With a stellar lineup of panelists over the three-day conference, Cradle is also hoping that entrepreneurs attending Cradle Buzz walk away with valuable lessons and tips by the panellists on their own experiences of going regional.   Among the panellists are Joel Neoh, international vice president of Asia Pacific at Groupon; Jason Khoo vice president of business development at Flexiroam; Bob Chua of Pulsate, Leon Foong, general manager of Uber Technologies; and Matt Chandran, founder and chief executive officer of InfoValley Group.   Meanwhile, entrepreneurs aside, Cradle has also reached out to the Junior World Economic Forum and a few targeted universities and colleges to encourage their members and students (both Malaysians and Asean students) to attend Cradle Buzz.   The hope is that the students are not just be inspired to become entrepreneurs themselves, but would perhaps zoom in on cool startups they may want to be involved with.   And though the focus is on startups and small medium enterprises, Hazel says, “We do welcome large companies to join in.”   Cradle feels that the networking opportunity offered at Cradle Buzz will allow them to meet potential partners who can add value to their businesses or even be acquisition targets – yet even more incentive for startups to join Cradle Buzz happening in two days’ time.   Related Stories:   Asean startup stars to gather at inaugural Cradle Buzz   Animonsta overcomes challenges to grow   Global Startup Youth is back, this time with Asean focus   World Entrepreneurship Forum takes Malaysia’s advice, thanks to Cradle’s Nazrin     For more technology news and the latest updates, follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn or Like us on Facebook.


News Article | September 22, 2014
Site: www.themalaymailonline.com

Digerati50: The best still to come from Matt Chandran Founder of InfoValley Group Matt Chandran. — DNA picKUALA LUMPUR, Sept 22 — Matt Chandran, founder of the InfoValley Group, hit the headlines in June 2013 when he received RM70 million in funding from Agensi Inovasi Malaysia (AIM) for its subsidiary iGene, an advanced medical informatics company. The investment valued iGene, whose crown jewel is its Digital Autopsy System, at around RM200 million. The AIM investment was the single largest venture capital bet made on a Malaysian life sciences company by a government venture fund. However, he first got into the radar back in 2004 when he contributed an article to leading business weekly The Edge, on his version of what branding ought to be for entrepreneurs. Having just attended a technopreneur forum, he was dismissive of the “old fashioned” concepts of branding he heard, including from a large venture capitalist firm which advised tech entrepreneurs to spend more on advertising and promotions. He then offered his own vision of branding that “fellow entrepreneurs could draw a leaf from.” Those who know him describe Matt as a very focused, intellectual and practical entrepreneur who is not lacking in self-confidence or belief. For instance, on Oct 29, 2013, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak witnessed the official launch of Matt’s £3-million (RM15.1-million) Digital Autopsy Facility at Sheffield’s Medico-Legal Centre, at the World Islamic Economic Forum (WIEF) in London. When asked if he considered that the high point of his entrepreneurial journey so far, he replies: “In all honesty, no. I always knew we were on the right path and that the acceptance of the Digital Autopsy System would snowball slowly.” Matt understands instinctively that his customers, many of them in healthcare, are not buying a piece of technology. They want to buy a solution that makes their jobs easier. That is what he is always seeking to deliver. But he knows technology is the backbone for delivering this customer delight. Towards that, he has invested RM28 million over the past eight years into research and development, just for his Digital Autopsy System — an incredible amount to be invested in by a small company, but Matt shrugs it off. “If you are an entrepreneur and you believe in something, you will do anything you can to try and make that happen, and I just ploughed most of the profits from my other businesses back into this,” he says. This brings us to what all the excitement over iGene is about. Its Digital Autopsy System allows for autopsies to be conducted with no cutting of a body. It involves a three-dimensional scan of the body using a CT scanner. iGene’s visualisation software then converts the data into an accurate representation of the body to enable pathologists to conduct a full, non-invasive digital post-mortem. This puts it in the good books of all the major religious bodies which abhor the age-old forensic method of slicing up the dead to determine cause of death. Matt first tried to sell it in Malaysia and while response was good, he got frustrated with the pace of progress. But because he knew the system had global appeal, he started looking overseas for customers and that is how he now has a commercial system employed in the United Kingdom, and bringing in revenue. He is now talking to a venture firm in the United States which wants the rights for the US market. “If this happens, it will be on a revenue share model but with them paying for all the expenses to set up the system,” he says. It has been a 13-year journey for Matt so far, but one suspects his best years are yet to come. — Digital News Asia Digerati50 is a weekly series that profiles the top 50 influencers, movers and shakers who are helping shape Malaysia’s Digital Economy. * This article was first published here.

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