Waltham, MA, United States

Infoscitex Corporation

www.infoscitex.com
Waltham, MA, United States
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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 694.57K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) is a key military capability aimed at enabling strategic and tactical use of space. To achieve these objectives, the design, assembly and deployment of unmanned spacecraft supporting DoD space missions must be radically overhauled to resemble a modular production and integration process. One significant focus of the current ORS need is to address thermal management systems. In this Air Force Phase II SBIR, IST proposes the continued development and validation of a reconfigurable, versatile and rapidly installable thermal control system (TCS). IST"s active thermal tile (ATT) TCS is designed to be highly compatible with current and future ORS platforms, has built-in failsafe electronics, is robust to launch conditions, and efficiently and effectively performs thermal transfer. Not only will the ATT system meet the operational and performance requirements set forth by the ORS office, it will eliminate the need for specific thermal analysis and design of each component interface, in-series development with other systems, design of unique spacecraft-level TCS, and detail verification. The proposed Phase II effort will focus on completion of the IST ATT system such that cost, form factor and architecture versatility for the ORS mission are optimized. BENEFIT: The ATT technology represents a fundamental building block for future DOD small tactical satellites, whose use is expected to increase drastically in coming years as the US military moves towards more responsive and/or expendable space assets. The ATT system is also applicable to traditional military and commercial satellites as well as"lean"satellites, or, satellites which embody a semi-modular design. Terrestrial applications for the ATT system are numerous and include power electronics, solar thermal energy conversion and consumer electronics.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.93K | Year: 2013

Junctional and non-compressible bleeding is a life-threatening injury that requires immediate intervention. Therefore it is best to train even non-medics in the application of the life-saving methods to stop these hemorrhages. The ideal system would enable training on multiple injury types, react realistically to properly applied intervention, utilize the adjuncts as would be used in the field, and provide immediate, quantified feedback as to the trainee"s performance. In consideration of these requirements, Infoscitex is developing a physical mannequin that can provide the most realistic representation of junctional and non-compressible hemorrhage. The Hemorrhage Instrumented Training System (HITS) presented here is designed specifically for this purpose and includes the following features: - Realistic full-body mannequin enables training of body repositioning as necessary with medical intervention - Multiple pre-molded injuries allow rapid test setup for the instructor and allows multiple scenarios for the trainees - Realistically clotting blood analogue provides accurate and realistic response to appropriately applied interventions - Water cleanup makes test reset easy and quick - Instrumented mannequin skin and vasculature provide data that conforms with standardized scoring systems such as SCORM.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.91K | Year: 2013

Mannequins are often used to develop skills and train medical personnel. Existing models fall short of ideal functionality, however. Mannequins that can provide simulated systemic responses are generally not equipped for simulating surgical intervention. Mannequins that can simulate surgical intervention are not able to record exact student actions for quantifying their performance. In careful consideration of the needs of the system, and the best way to economically and realistically meet the needs, Infoscitex Corporation is developing the Physical Anatomical Trainer Instrumented for Education and Non-subjective Testing (PATIENT). PATIENT uses complementary technologies to present the most realistic model for modern training requirements for organs, vasculature, instrumentation, and controls. With the right components, the physical configuration of a proper tissue trainer is relatively straightforward. Under previous funding, we have developed inexpensive polymeric organ models that bleed realistically under traumatic or surgical events. We have also developed a blood analogue that clots in the presence of bandage and pressure. In this Phase 1 effort, we will address the instrumentation for the organs, the method for relaying force data and controlling the response of each organ, and develop the control algorithms that govern PATIENT.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.95K | Year: 2013

Modern advances in 3D printing and related additive manufacturing technologies offer an approach to provide high-fidelity anatomical models that can be used for medical simulation and training. Current 3D printing systems do not provide a method for various materials to be simultaneously deposited to represent the various properties of tissue, bone, muscle, etc, nor do they provide directionality of supporting structures on a micro-scale. For simulated tissues we need to be able to print materials that include the following properties: Wide range of stiffness from solid bone to gelatinous fatty tissues Modulus of elasticity that is different along one direction than in the orthogonal directions Controlled adhesion between layers of dissimilar materials Ability to create cavities for hollow organs and vessels Provide representative mechanical properties in addition to tactile feel and realistic colors Because of these unusual requirements, a rapid prototyping system for simulated organs and anatomical structures will require a custom design that advances the state of the art in rapid manufacturing. Infoscitex Corporation and its collaborators at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are currently developing the Synthetic Heterogeneous Anatomy by Rapid Prototyping (SHARP) system to address these needs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.98K | Year: 2013

Balance disorders have a large negative impact on quality of life. Several methods have been developed that can help patients stay balanced, however these systems at present remain tethered to a gait lab or to a balance platform. A real time system that calculates the center of pressure and extrapolates the patient"s motions to determine stability during ambulation would enable these systems to become ambulatory devices that a patient can use at all times, dramatically increasing their usefulness to the patient population and opening new avenues for more intense training that may yield better results faster. The On-the-Move Balance Assessment (OMBA) system is designed to meet the noted needs. OMBA uses two different algorithms to robustly calculate whether the user is in danger of falling, providing predictive information in time for corrective action. OMBA is designed to be comfortable to wear and easy to use, with extremely low rate of false positives and no false negative alerts. Our team is well positioned to develop OMBA within the SBIR framework. We present a Phase I proposal aimed to address the novel aspects of the system, so that a complete system can be fabricated and tested in Phase II.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2013

A sensor for rapidly and reliably measuring the blood concentration level of an intravenously administered analgesic/anesthetic medication is proposed, providing a key feedback element for closed loop target controlled infusion analgesia/anesthesia (TCIA) systems. The addition of direct measurement of analgesic/anesthetic concentration to existing physiological/neurological feedback will address FDA concerns regarding closed loop TCIA systems and thereby facilitate approval. In the context of forward surgical care and medical evacuation of injured solders, the potential benefits of closed loop TCI are greatly multiplied, where medical personnel are stretched thin, conditions are hostile, and rapid changes in patient status are frequent. The proposed sensor achieves high signal to noise ratios, when measuring propofol, nalbuphine, and other phenolic compounds (e.g., opioids), thereby enabling accurate measurement of analgesia/anesthesia concentration with minute volumes of blood. Moreover, it is inherently small, suggesting that it can be designed for deployment for forward or EnRoute care, where size, weight and power are key considerations. Accordingly, Phase I will include (1) proof-of-principle testing in the laboratory, (2) planning and preparation for Phase II testing of prototype sensors in which sensor performance will be verified, and (3) development of a sensor design that is suitable for military deployment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.92K | Year: 2013

Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is condition in which a single nerve, nerve groups, or nerves become damaged. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to manage. Mild pain can be treated with over the counter analgesics. In cases when the pain is persistent and more severe, injections of, or topical patches containing local anesthetics, can be used. In order to provide a safe and no adverse side effect PN pain relief, the topical application and neuronally specific delivery of painkillers is an important strategy. Iontophoresis is a medication delivery method that can be used to reduce the risk of systemic side effects as opposed to oral medications by delivering a greater concentration of medication to a local area with a very low systemic dose. The result is a noninvasive drug delivery method with high patient acceptability. Nano-formulated compositions are promising means for transdermal tissue specific drug delivery, as they allow both long-term drug stability and sustained on demand release of the active drugs. Infoscitex Corporation (IST) and Northern Kentucky University (NKU) developed a concept that combines both of the above methods to result in a highly efficient, biocompatible, and topically administered and tissue specific PN treatment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 998.99K | Year: 2012

Extant virtually reality surgical simulators are predominantly focused on simulating minimally invasive surgeries where the surgeon"s interaction is with long tools through fixed access ports. Infoscitex is building on the considerable body of work generated in developing the tissue properties and image generation engines for these simulators, along with more recent work in haptic and tactile feedback, to create a realistic simulator for open surgery. Tactile feedback sufficiently detailed for textural information enables the Tactile and Haptics Enabled Open (THEO) Surgery Simulator to simulate the feel of open surgery as well as the use of tools, therefore creating a truly multi-purpose simulator for a wide range of applications. Infoscitex is partnered with clinical collaborators at the Lahey Clinic and research collaborators at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) to develop the THEO surgery simulator.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.88K | Year: 2012

An automated, closed loop individualized system for administration of analgesic and anesthetic medication to patients is proposed in order to ensure vigilant, optimized care, especially in special circumstances when a large number of trauma patients must be treated simultaneously by a limited number of medical personnel. The result is improved pain management, safety, outcome, and reduced complications such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Deployable Analgesia Administration System (DAAU) optimally sets the infusion rate and rapidly delivers an initial bolus, based on a population pharmacokinetic approach and employs feedback from vital signs monitoring and automated mental status assessment, as well as a novel means to actively query the brain to monitor analgesic/anesthetic depth, in order to safely oversee infusion. A staged product development is proposed, moving from automatic analgesia/anesthesia delivery to the conscious patient, to infusion of medication into patients whose level of consciousness is diminished either by their injuries or requirement for surgical depth of anesthesia. Phase II consists of (1) verification of biomarkers which reflect patient status and their incorporation into medication infusion algorithms, (2) construction and verification of function of a Deployable Autonomous Analgesia Unit (DAAU) prototype, (3) preclinical verification of safety of DAAU in established animal models receiving analgesia/anesthesia from the DAAU, (4) further investigation of a noninvasive sensor for monitoring analgesic/anesthetic depth (as the DAAU adjusts infusion), (5) risk management, and (6) testing to assess ease of use and setup.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 722.57K | Year: 2012

Motion sickness is of concern in the transport of troops, be it by air, by land, or by sea. Motion sickness affects the ability to function at the peak of performance, which is particularly important for troops immersed in theatre. Despite the potential difficulties that can be incited by motion sickness, armed forces are frequently subjected to situations that can bring on motion sickness. Driving under indirect-vision driving (IVD) conditions is particularly disposed to result in motion sickness. To date the only proven methods for reducing symptoms of motion sickness are pharmacological and thus, are of limited use to armed forces. Pharmaceuticals must be taken in advance of transport, a luxury of time our troops dont always have. Moreover, they typically have associated cognitive effects which last long after transportation is completed. Our promising on-demand, non-pharmacological method of mitigating motion sickness, will be of considerable aid to our troops driving under IVD conditions, enabling them to reach destinations and complete missions without the adverse and prolonged effects of either motion sickness or traditional treatments. We completed a fully functional prototype of the system during the Phase I effort and are poised to demonstrate its efficacy in laboratory and field tests.

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