Estonian Information Technology College

Tallinn, Estonia

Estonian Information Technology College

Tallinn, Estonia
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Ernits M.,Tallinn University of Technology | Ernits M.,Estonian Information Technology College | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2016

This paper introduces an Intelligent Training Exercise Environment (i-tee), a fully automated, open source platform for cyber defense classes and competitions. The platform allows to simulate realistic cyberattack situation in virtual and sandboxed environment to give a hands-on experience of a critical situation. The main outcome is an open source virtual cyber simulator that enables hands-on, practical learning. The platform can be integrated into existing curricula or used to create a new subject or a competition event. A student needs only a web browser and a remote desktop protocol client to start exploring the system. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016.


Colonna J.,Federal University of Amazonas | Peet T.,Estonian Information Technology College | Ferreira C.A.,Polytechnic Institute of Porto | Jorge A.M.,University of Porto | And 2 more authors.
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series | Year: 2016

Anurans (frogs or toads) are closely related to the ecosystem and they are commonly used by biologists as early indicators of ecological stress. Automatic classification of anurans, by processing their calls, helps biologists analyze the activity of anurans on larger scale. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) can be used for gathering data automatically over a large area. WSNs usually set restrictions on computing and transmission power for extending the network's lifetime. Deep Learning algorithms have gathered a lot of popularity in recent years, especially in the field of image recognition. Being an eager learner, a trained Deep Learning model does not need a lot of computing power and could be used in hardware with limited resources. This paper investigates the possibility of using Convolutional Neural Networks with Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs) as input for the task of classifying anuran sounds. © 2016 ACM.


Matsak E.,Tallinn University | Lehtpuu T.,Estonian Information Technology College | Lorents P.,Estonian Business School
Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies | Year: 2015

This paper presents a modified version of forward chaining method of reasoning and a prototype implementation called Sylar-System for Logic and Automated reasoning, which can be used for situation management. The method, presented by the authors, implements Modus Ponens and Modus Tollens by Truth tables and a SAT solver to discover hidden knowledge and suggest decisions. Also, it gives the opportunity to use multi-step inferences. Proposed method is suitable for this specific kind of decision making process. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.


Lorenz B.,Tallinn University | Kalde K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2012

The goal of our paper is to point out the shortcomings in the cloud-based learning implementations regarding law, policies as well as security threats and awareness. Estonian schools and local authorities are interested in implementing new tools, especially when they are free of charge. Some Tallinn schools are already using systems like edu@live or Google Scholar. We survey and interview schools in Tallinn in order to test their readiness to implement cloud computing. Our results show high interest in using Web 2.0 tools, but also reveal serious lack of knowledge about e-safety as well as little know-how about the responsibilities and limitations in using cloud-based applications to store sensitive data. We also provide recommendations for schools using these tools for both students and teachers. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Lorenz B.,Tallinn University | Lorenz B.,Estonian Information Technology College | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College | And 2 more authors.
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2016

Schools from all over the world are moving into the direction of using more e-learning, digital gadgets and BYOD (Bring Your Own Device). In the Estonian Strategy for Lifelong Learning 2020, the switch to 1:1 computing in classroom is called “Digital Turn”. The strategy relies on expectations that smarter use of personal digital devices will improve not only digital literacy of pupils, but also their academic achievements in various subjects. The Estonian government plans to allocate 47 million Euros of national and EU structural funds until year 2020 for this purpose. There is also interest in improving digital skills of school-leavers on the side of the industry, as the Estonian ICT sector expects to double the turnover within the next 4-5 years. The sectoral analysis estimated the need for 8000 new employees in ICT companies. To achieve this, the industry has supported various educational programs like the Look@World Foundation’s Smart Lab project, Samsung Digital Turn project for schools, using Raspberry Pi-s at school supported by Transfer Wise, Microsoft’s Partners in Learning projects and so on. Challenges for the digital turn are related to people’s involvement (teachers, school leaders, students, parents, officers); resources (gadgets, time, salary, maintenance); promises (this is beneficial for improving the students’ skills and competences and also is the only way); lack of analysis (act more, measure less). In this article we will study the Samsung’s Digital Turn project applications for the schools 2014 and 2015 in order to understand what are the goals for the schools when they think of digital turn; we also have asked school ICT administrators, educational technologists and school leaders to list seven issues that come into their mind that should be death with in the process, and surveyed teachers of one school over a 4-year period, tracking the changes in using technology as well as learning and teaching. We will analyze the data to understand the trends and difficulties schools will face during this journey. This information is needed to train all other 450 schools that have not started their digital turn change yet, but are forced to act soon. The trends in digital turn projects will tell us the maturing process and goals that the schools have as opportunities and strengths while the list of difficulties shows the project’s weaknesses and threats. Looking at one school over 4 years will help us to understand the change, especially the areas that have changed in teachers’ practices. In the conclusion we propose a list of actions that can be used to meet the challenges that can ruin the digital turn for most schools. We also propose an area of measures where the digital turn is the most visible. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016.


Laugasson E.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2014

Privacy and confidentiality are important components of digital literacy. Yet nowadays documents can be found online, which apparently consist only of one or two pages yet have huge file size - even several megabytes. Such documents may contain sensitive data that has been deleted but actually is still there. Our study provides an analysis of such cases in public sector of Estonia. Based on experiments and public sector web page analysis we describe security threats and features of different file formats and offer suggestions for their use, e.g. we found that using open-source formats like OpenDocument may help prevention of accidental disclosure of data. © 2014 Springer International Publishing.


Lorenz B.,Tallinn University | Banister S.I.,Bowling Green State University | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2015

This study represents findings from three continents (Asia, Africa and South America) regarding usage of ICT in six rural schools. Our goal was to analyze the current situation regarding digital technologies in these environments, describe similarities and differences relating to the digital divide, and provide a roadmap that could improve teaching and learning, maximizing the use of existing resources. Our case study was carried out with the help of innovative teachers who are supportive of technology integration in teaching, but have less options to utilize this knowledge in their classrooms because of various barriers. Our results show challenges, but also opportunities to embrace new ways of teaching; ways that might allow digital technologies to be employed in innovative ways to encourage student learning and community growth. Our study is based on participating teachers’ understanding of the issues and challenges within these countries and areas, relating to schooling. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.


Lorenz B.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College | Laanpere M.,Tallinn University
Communications in Computer and Information Science | Year: 2013

This paper describes an exploratory study on school-level e-safety policy development. The research was based on the participatory design-based methodology, involving various stakeholders in a school-level policy development exercise. Our aim was to find out whether the schools with open and participatory culture would choose more flexible, emancipatory and participatory approach to e-safety policy development, while schools with rationalmanagerial organizational culture tend to rely on prescriptive approaches and technology-driven solutions in their e-safety policies. Regarding future research, we plan to continue the work to construct a new design and development platform to be used in a more flexible and bottom-up manner instead of strict prescriptive rule sets provided on the national level. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.


Lorenz B.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College | Klooster A.,Tallinn University
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2013

Picking good passwords is a cornerstone of computer security. Yet already since the early days (e.g. The Stockings Were Hung by the Chimney with Care from 1973; we have also borrowed our title from the 1995 movie Hackers), insecure passwords have been a major liability. Ordinary users want simple and fast solutions - they either choose a trivial (to remember and to guess) password, or pick a good one, write it down and stick the paper under the mouse pad, inside the pocket book or to the monitor. They are also prone to reflecting their personal preferences in their password choices, providing telling hints online and giving them out on just a simple social engineering attack. Kevin Mitnick has said that security is not a product that can be purchased off the shelf, but consists of policies, people, processes, and technology. This applies fully to password security as well. We studied several different groups (students, educators, ICT specialists etc - more than 300 people in total) and their password usage. The methods included password practices survey, password training sessions, discussions and also simulated social engineering attacks (the victims were informed immediately about their mistakes). We suggest that password training should be adjusted for different focus groups. For example, we found that schoolchildren tend to grasp new concepts faster - often, a simple explanation is enough to improve the password remarkably. Thus, we would stress the people and process aspects of the Mitnick formula mentioned above.At the same time, many officials and specialists tend to react to password training with dismissal and scorn (our study suggests that 'you cannot guess my password' is an alarmingly common mindset). Examples like 'admin', 'Password', '123456' etc have occurred even at qualified security professionals, more so at educators. Yet, as Estonia is increasingly relying on the E-School system, these passwords are becoming a prime target. Therefore, for most adult users we suggest putting the emphasis on policy and technology aspects (strict, software-enforced lower limits of acceptable password length, character variability checks, but also clearly written rulesets etc). © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Lorenz B.,Tallinn University | Lorenz B.,Estonian Information Technology College | Kikkas K.,Tallinn University | Kikkas K.,Estonian Information Technology College
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2014

Today, both employees and employers are active online. A lot of people live their lives through personal online social networks. Online social networking sites are an easy tool to screen potential employees online profiles and for human resource management to use in recruitment processes. The screening process includes Internet and social networking site search that will provide not only professional but also personal information. Investigating personal information, however, may be considered violation of privacy. Our study goals are to find out how common it is to do background checks on possible future employees in Estonia, how students feel about such a practice and how they maintain their public profiles. Methods used to gather information were a survey among employees (n=34), pupils (n=117) from five high schools, students (n=91) from one university, and a case study that involved pupils (n=54) and students (n=38). Results reported in this paper will give an overview of our understanding of the accuracy of online profiles, common practices, unspoken risks, and maybe even frustration from the side of future employees. The results of this study can be applied to improve youth-related Internet safety training modules and programmes. © 2014 Springer International Publishing.

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