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News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Gas sensors used for leakage alerts and air quality monitoring are essential in our daily lives. Towards a ubiquitous society, smart gas sensors, which perform signal processing and communication besides sensing, have attracted much attention. In addition, integrating these functions into a single chip leads to low-cost and miniature smart gas-sensing systems. Semiconductor gas sensors, which are the most widely used gas sensors, require a sensor material to be heated to several hundreds of degree Celsius. Therefore, in order to integrate these gas sensors with electronic circuits, a micro-hotplate (MHP), which is a MEMS-based heating structure, is required to thermally isolate the sensor and the circuits. The MHP is generally mechanically unstable, and there exists a tradeoff between the mechanical stability and thermal isolation property. Recently, a research team at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology proposed the employment of SU-8 as a supporting material for the MHP, in order to improve the mechanical stability, while ensuring the thermal isolation property. Furthermore, SU-8 is a polymer material that is widely used for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and has good mechanical stability and low thermal conductivity. The researchers fabricated the MHP and investigated its heating characteristics. The first author Assistant Professor, Tatsuya Iwata, said that "By using a thick polymer film, it is possible to realize both the mechanical stability and high thermal isolation property. Furthermore, although we have to evaluate the mechanical stability, this device is promising for smart gas sensors." "Mechanical stability is one of the major concerns for fabricating an MHP. Using a polymer material for such microhotplates seems to be an eccentric approach, but surprisingly, it went well. Moreover, this device will boost our study to develop multimodal sensors, which are multifunctional integrated sensors including gas sensors," said Professor Kazuaki Sawada. The fabricated MHP consists of a heating membrane with an area of 140 μm × 140 μm, and a 33-μm-thick SU-8 layer deposited on its bridges. The simulation confirmed that the MHP displayed good thermal isolation properties (Fig. 1). The MHP temperature was found to reach 550 °C at 5V. Moreover, the power consumption of the MHP approximately corresponded to 13.9 mW for heating to 300 °C, which is comparable with the power consumption reported in the previous studies. Furthermore, a stable operation under a constant voltage was observed for 100 min. Owing to the thick SU-8 layer, the MHP does not need the strict control of the stress that occurs inside the membrane during the fabrication process. This feature, together with the good thermal isolation property, enables the flexible layout design of the chip, and therefore, the MHP is beneficial to a miniature smart gas sensor chip. The researchers will advance their study to realize such smart gas sensors. This research results were reported in the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, on January 11, 2017. Funding agency: Japan Society for Promotion of Science, Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B), Grant Number 15K18049 T. Iwata, W. P. C. Soo, K. Matsuda, K. Takahashi, M. Ishida, and K. Sawada (2017), Design, fabrication, and characterization of bridge-type microhotplates with an SU-8 supporting layer for a smart gas sensing system, J. Micromechanics Microengineering, 27(2), 24003. Toyohashi University of Technology, which was founded in 1976 as a National University of Japan, is a leading research institute in the fields of mechanical engineering, advanced electronics, information sciences, life sciences, and architecture.


ARLINGTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--CACI International Inc (NYSE:CACI) announced today that it has been awarded a $79 million task order by the U.S. Army Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate (I2WD) to support I2WD’s Innovative Intelligence Solutions and Systems Engineering Support program. The three-year task order, awarded under CACI’s Technical Information Engineering Services (TIES) contract vehicle, represents continuing work for the company in its Intelligence Systems and Support


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Think Global Forum and Vistatec are delighted to announce the latest Technology Forum as part of the developing Think Global Forum community. Vistatec, Senior Vice President, New Business, Worldwide, Michele Smith and NetApp, Senior Director, Globalization Programs Strategy Office and Information Engineering, and Women in Localization Co-Founder, Anna N Schlegel will be launching the Technology Forum on Dec 7, 2016 at the Pullman San Francisco Bay Hotel, San Francisco, California. The forum is part of the expanding Think Global Forum initiative, where leading experts within industry verticals (Technology, Travel, Manufacturing, Life Sciences and Retail) come together to develop global thought leadership initiatives and outputs for specific sectors around the world. Michele Smith will chair the inaugural Technology Forum and will be joined by Anna N Schlegel who will be a forum executive along with other leaders from within the technology sector. Anna N Schlegel is the author of the recently published book ‘Truly Global’ and a well respected senior industry leader who brings a wealth of experience in the globalization industry. Anna will be a keynote speaker at the launch event in addition to her role as a forum executive. Michele Smith commented on the launch of the Technology Forum “We are really looking forward to launching the Think Global Forum for Technology in California in December. Palo Alto is known as a hub of tech giants and it was our number one choice when the Think Global Forum team were considering places to launch this exciting technology event.” Other Forums launched by this initiative include, Think Global Forum Travel and Think Global Forum Manufacturing. This new Think Global Forum Technology event marks the third in the series of dedicated forums so far this year. The Think Global Forums for Life Sciences and Retail are to be launched in 2017. Each Forum has a dedicated group of industry leaders all of whom are senior executives in their respective companies. The Think Global Forum has some of the worlds leading companies, brands and people who are all part of this growing global community. ‘When businesses around the world are considering going global, they need to have different cultures in mind and consider things from another’s perspective. The Think Global Forum for Technology is a super initiative as it brings people together from different areas of the same industry to discuss various aspects of technology, localization and globalization which is increasingly important across the world for all companies.” Added Anna N Schlegel. To learn more about Think Global Forum - Technology visit http://www.thinkglobalforum.org Michele, a leading localization executive, is Senior Vice President of New Business Development Worldwide at Vistatec. Her focus is on growth and innovation to help Vistatec further develop global clients. With over 15 years travel and hospitality industry experience, Michele has held a number of senior positions with companies such as United Airlines, Royal Caribbean International and Expedia. You can follow Michele @chelelife on twitter. Anna N Schlegel is a native of Catalunya, and the co-founder of Kenya’s “Imagine Educating Everyone” and “Women in Localization” which was started in California. She has worked in globalization teams for over twenty years with firms including Cisco, VMware, Xerox, and NetApp and for two localization vendors as the CEO and general manager. Her work has been published on Forbes.com, Gala.com, Multilingual.com, and other research industry forums. Anna is a respected leader in the globalization community. She frequently delivers lectures, webinars, keynotes and round tables at universities, corporations, and other international organizations. She lives with her family in Santa Clara, California. You can follow Anna @annapapallona on twitter. The Think Global Forum is a body of industry professionals designed to provide insights and thought leadership in the context of the globalization of products and services around the world. With a strong interest in all things localization the forum is made up of industry thought leaders who can offer keen insights into the here and now and importantly the future. Vistatec has been supporting some of the world’s most iconic brands to optimize their global commercial potential since 1997. Vistatec is one of the world’s leading localization solutions providers headquartered in Dublin, Ireland with offices in Mountain View, California, USA.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: phys.org

Semiconductor gas sensors, which are the most widely used gas sensors, require a sensor material to be heated to several hundreds of degree Celsius. Therefore, in order to integrate these gas sensors with electronic circuits, a micro-hotplate (MHP), which is a MEMS-based heating structure, is required to thermally isolate the sensor and the circuits. The MHP is generally mechanically unstable, and there exists a tradeoff between the mechanical stability and thermal isolation property. Recently, a research team at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology proposed the employment of SU-8 as a supporting material for the MHP, in order to improve the mechanical stability, while ensuring the thermal isolation property. Furthermore, SU-8 is a polymer material that is widely used for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and has good mechanical stability and low thermal conductivity. The researchers fabricated the MHP and investigated its heating characteristics. The first author Assistant Professor, Tatsuya Iwata, said that "By using a thick polymer film, it is possible to realize both the mechanical stability and high thermal isolation property. Furthermore, although we have to evaluate the mechanical stability, this device is promising for smart gas sensors." "Mechanical stability is one of the major concerns for fabricating an MHP. Using a polymer material for such microhotplates seems to be an eccentric approach, but surprisingly, it went well. Moreover, this device will boost our study to develop multimodal sensors, which are multifunctional integrated sensors including gas sensors," said Professor Kazuaki Sawada. The fabricated MHP consists of a heating membrane with an area of 140 μm × 140 μm, and a 33-μm-thick SU-8 layer deposited on its bridges. The simulation confirmed that the MHP displayed good thermal isolation properties (Fig. 1). The MHP temperature was found to reach 550 °C at 5V. Moreover, the power consumption of the MHP approximately corresponded to 13.9 mW for heating to 300 °C, which is comparable with the power consumption reported in the previous studies. Furthermore, a stable operation under a constant voltage was observed for 100 min. Owing to the thick SU-8 layer, the MHP does not need the strict control of the stress that occurs inside the membrane during the fabrication process. This feature, together with the good thermal isolation property, enables the flexible layout design of the chip, and therefore, the MHP is beneficial to a miniature smart gas sensor chip. The researchers will advance their study to realize such smart gas sensors. More information: T Iwata et al, Design, fabrication, and characterization of bridge-type micro-hotplates with an SU-8 supporting layer for a smart gas sensing system, Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (2017). DOI: 10.1088/1361-6439/aa556b


News Article | March 21, 2016
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

Artificial intelligence must be kept under human control or we may become defenseless against its capabilities, warn two University of Sydney machine-learning experts. Professor Dong Xu, Chair in Computer Engineering from the University of Sydney’s School of Electrical Engineering and Information Engineering says the defeat of the world champion Go player has raised fresh concerns about the future role of artificial intelligence (AI) devices. The Professor, whose research interests include computer vision, machine-learning and multimedia content analysis, says the question now is how much we should control AI’s ability to self-learn. “The scientists and technology investors have been enthusiastic about AI for several years, but the triumph of the supercomputer has finally made the public conscious of its capabilities. This marks a significant breakthrough in the technology world,” Professor Xu says. “Supercomputers are more powerful than the human mind. Competitive games such as Go or chess are actually all about rules — they are easy for a computer. Once a computer grasps them, it will become very good at playing the games.” Professor Xu says: “The problem is that computers like AlphaGo aren’t good at the overall strategy, but they are good at partial ones because they search better within a smaller area. This explains why AI will often lag behind in the beginning but catches up later. “A human player can be affected by emotions, such as pressure or happiness, but a computer will not. “It’s said that a person is able to memorize 1000 games in a year, but a computer can memorize tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands during the same period. And a supercomputer can always improve — if it loses one game, then it would analyze it and do better next time. “If a supercomputer could totally imitate the human brain, and have human emotions, such as being angry or sad, it will be even more dangerous." Currently, AI is good for the labor-intensive industries and can work as human substitutes to serve the public interest. They can clean, work as agricultural robots in the fields, or probe deep underground. "Another challenge is that AI needs a more intelligent environment. For instance, self-driven automobiles often can’t recognize a red light, so if the traffic lights could send a signal to the cars and they could sense them, it would solve the problem. Singapore is making an effort to build an area with roads that are friendly or responsive to self-driven vehicles." Professor Xu believes it is crucial for companies, such as Google and Facebook, to set up “moral and ethics committees” to take control to ensure scientific research won’t head in the wrong direction and create machines that act maliciously. Dr. Michael Harre, a senior lecturer in complex systems who spent several years studying the AI behind the ancient Chinese board game, says: “Go is probably the most complicated game that is commonly played today. Even when compared to chess, which has a very large number of possible patterns, Go has more possible patterns than there are atoms in the universe. “The technology has developed to a point that it can now outsmart a human in both simple and complex tasks. This is a concern, because artificial intelligence technology may reach a point in a few years where it is feasible that it could be adapted to areas of defense where a human may no longer be needed in the control loop: truly autonomous AI."


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

According to a new market research report "Road Safety Market by Solution (Red Light Enforcement, Speed Enforcement, Incident Detection System, Bus Lane Compliance, and Automatic License Plate Recognition), Service (Consulting & System Integration and Risk Assessment) - Global Forecast to 2021", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is estimated to grow from USD 2.60 Billion in 2016 to USD 4.06 Billion by 2021, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 9.3% during the forecast period. Browse 44 market data Tables and 50 Figures spread through 132 Pages and in-depth TOC on Road Safety Market http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/road-safety-market-93636585.html Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report. The major forces driving the Road Safety Market include increase in mobility and the associated demands on transportation systems, increase in urbanization, increase in road accidents/fatality rate, and growing government regulations for road safety. Red light enforcement expected to be the largest segment terms of market size in the Road Safety Market Red light enforcement is one of the most important safety control systems in the traffic management. This system is easy and cost-efficient compared to other safety devices. Also, with the advent of smart cities and safety initiatives, governments of different countries are installing red light enforcement systems. Hence, this segment expected to dominate the road safety solutions market. Professional services segment expected to be the largest segment in terms of market size in the road safety services market during the forecast period Professional services include consulting and system integration; training, support, and maintenance; and risk assessment and analysis. Professional services are useful for enhancing business productivity, business efficiency, operational improvements, quality of service, and prudent financial management. All these factors are fueling the adoption of professional services and hence this segment expected to be the largest segment in road safety services market. North America expected to be the biggest contributor, followed by Europe, to the Road Safety Market The North American region projected to dominate the Road Safety Market during the forecast period. The driving factors for this growth are large-scale investments in road safety systems and solutions, government initiatives, and early adoption of technology. Europe is the second highest contributor to the Road Safety Market owing to strict regulations and presence of a large number of original equipment manufacturers and solution providers. In addition, the Road Safety Market remains competitive with the presence of a large number of vendors such as Jenoptik AG, Kapsch TrafficCom AG, Sensys Gatso Group AB., Redflex Holdings Limited, 3M, FLIR Systems, Inc., Motorola Solutions, Swarco AG, American Traffic Solutions, and Information Engineering Group, Inc. The report also encompasses different strategies, such as mergers & acquisitions, partnerships & collaborations, and new product developments, adopted by major players to increase their market share. Public Safety and Security Market by Solution, Service, Vertical (Homeland Security, Emergency Services, Manufacturing, and Others), and Region (North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa and Latin America) - Global Forecast to 2020 Know More About our Knowledge Store @ http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Knowledgestore.asp MarketsandMarkets is the largest market research firm worldwide in terms of annually published premium market research reports. Serving 1700 global fortune enterprises with more than 1200 premium studies in a year, M&M is catering to a multitude of clients across 8 different industrial verticals. We specialize in consulting assignments and business research across high growth markets, cutting edge technologies and newer applications. Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model - GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. M&M's flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "RT" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets. The new included chapters on Methodology and Benchmarking presented with high quality analytical infographics in our reports gives complete visibility of how the numbers have been arrived and defend the accuracy of the numbers. We at MarketsandMarkets are inspired to help our clients grow by providing apt business insight with our huge market intelligence repository.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Gas sensors used for leakage alerts and air quality monitoring are essential in our daily lives. Toward a ubiquitous society, smart gas sensors, which perform signal processing and communication besides sensing, have attracted much attention. In addition, integrating these functions into a single chip leads to low-cost and miniature smart gas-sensing systems. Semiconductor gas sensors, which are the most widely used gas sensors, require a sensor material to be heated to several hundreds of degrees Celsius. Therefore, in order to integrate these gas sensors with electronic circuits, a micro-hotplate (MHP), which is a MEMS-based heating structure, is required to thermally isolate the sensor and the circuits. The MHP is generally mechanically unstable, and there exists a tradeoff between the mechanical stability and thermal isolation property. Recently, a research team at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology proposed the employment of SU-8 as a supporting material for the MHP, in order to improve the mechanical stability, while ensuring the thermal isolation property. Furthermore, SU-8 is a polymer material that is widely used for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and has good mechanical stability and low thermal conductivity. The researchers fabricated the MHP and investigated its heating characteristics. The first author Assistant Professor, Tatsuya Iwata, says that, “By using a thick polymer film, it is possible to realize both the mechanical stability and high thermal isolation property. Furthermore, although we have to evaluate the mechanical stability, this device is promising for smart gas sensors.” “Mechanical stability is one of the major concerns for fabricating an MHP. Using a polymer material for such microhotplates seems to be an eccentric approach, but surprisingly, it went well. Moreover, this device will boost our study to develop multimodal sensors, which are multifunctional integrated sensors including gas sensors,” says Professor Kazuaki Sawada. The fabricated MHP consists of a heating membrane with an area of 140 μm x 140 μm, and a 33-μm-thick SU-8 layer deposited on its bridges. The simulation confirmed that the MHP displayed good thermal isolation properties. The MHP temperature was found to reach 550 C at 5V. Moreover, the power consumption of the MHP approximately corresponded to 13.9 mW for heating to 300 C, which is comparable with the power consumption reported in the previous studies. Furthermore, a stable operation under a constant voltage was observed for 100 min. Owing to the thick SU-8 layer, the MHP does not need the strict control of the stress that occurs inside the membrane during the fabrication process. This feature, together with the good thermal isolation property, enables the flexible layout design of the chip, and therefore, the MHP is beneficial to a miniature smart gas sensor chip. The researchers will advance their study to realize such smart gas sensors. This research results were reported in the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A world-first study testing new underwater cameras on wild dolphins has given researchers the best view yet into their hidden marine world. A research team including experts from the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre and the University of Alaska Southeast trialled the custom-made non-invasive cameras to capture and analyse more than 535 minutes of such rarely-seen activities as mother-calf interaction, playing with kelp, and intimate social behaviours like flipper-rubbing. The results are published in the latest Marine Biology. "For the first time, these cameras have given us the opportunity to see what dolphins do on their own terms," said Dr Gabriel Machovsky-Capuska from the University of Sydney's School of Veterinary Science and Charles Perkins Centre. "There were no wildlife crews, no invasive underwater housings - and the dolphins remained largely unaffected by our cameras. This research opens up a whole new approach for capturing wild animal behaviour, which will ultimately help us to not only advance conservation efforts but also come closer to understanding wild predators' and human nutrition too." The successful deployment advances new approaches to filming wild sea creatures, aiding conservation and rehabilitation efforts and giving researchers unprecedented insight into wild dolphins' prey and habitats. "Dolphins are marine top predators that are considered biomonitors of marine environments, so gaining a better understanding of their lives will help us to better comprehend the health of marine environments including prey species like fish and squid that are highly consumed by humans," said Dr Machovsky-Capuska, who is also co-leader of the Human-Animal Interactions research node at the Charles Perkin Centre. The cameras were attached via suction cups to eight wild dusky dolphins, deployed using a long pole with the aid of Velcro pads. The footage was captured off the coast of New Zealand from December 2015 to January 2016, with each camera system loaded with memory boards, very high frequency and satellite transmitters, time depth recorders and having a battery life of six hours. "One challenge of doing this research on small and fast animals like dusky dolphins is that there is limited surface area on the dolphin's body for tag attachment, so there's only a small window of time to actually deploy the tag as the dolphin swims past," said Dr Peter Jones from the University of Sydney's School of Electrical and Information Engineering. "We have much to learn about animal behaviour and systems such as this are a great way to observe their activity in a natural environment with the least likely influence on that behaviour." Dolphin specialist Heidi Pearson, Assistant Professor of Marine Biology at the University of Alaska Southeast, said the research has great potential for protecting endangered species by giving scientists a much higher resolution of information than is possible than with other methods. "From the surface, researchers can only see about 10 percent of what is going on in an animal's life. With these video cameras, we can 'see' from the animals' perspective and begin to understand the challenges they face as they move throughout their habitat," she said. "For example, in marine areas subjected to high degrees of human disturbance such as shipping or coastal development, the ability to collect data from the animal's perspective will be critical in understanding how and to what extent these stressors affect an animal's ability to feed, mate, and raise young." The researchers now hope to further develop the cameras to test with marine predators including other cetacean species and sharks. The research was funded by the National Geographic Society Waitt Grant Fund and the Encounter Foundation (Kaikoura, New Zealand) and included the New Zealand Department of Conservation, Massey University (New Zealand) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (US) as project partners. Visit the Dropbox folder for images and video. Journal paper and interviews available on request.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A world-first study testing new underwater cameras on wild dolphins has given researchers the best view yet into their hidden marine world. A research team including experts from the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre and the University of Alaska Southeast trialled the custom-made non-invasive cameras to capture and analyze more than 535 minutes of such rarely-seen activities as mother-calf interaction, playing with kelp, and intimate social behaviors like flipper-rubbing. The results are published in the latest Marine Biology. "For the first time, these cameras have given us the opportunity to see what dolphins do on their own terms," said Gabriel Machovsky-Capuska from the University of Sydney's School of Veterinary Science and Charles Perkins Centre. "There were no wildlife crews, no invasive underwater housings - and the dolphins remained largely unaffected by our cameras. This research opens up a whole new approach for capturing wild animal behavior, which will ultimately help us to not only advance conservation efforts but also come closer to understanding wild predators' and human nutrition too." The successful deployment advances new approaches to filming wild sea creatures, aiding conservation and rehabilitation efforts and giving researchers unprecedented insight into wild dolphins' prey and habitats. "Dolphins are marine top predators that are considered biomonitors of marine environments, so gaining a better understanding of their lives will help us to better comprehend the health of marine environments including prey species like fish and squid that are highly consumed by humans," said Machovsky-Capuska, who is also co-leader of the Human-Animal Interactions research node at the Charles Perkin Centre. The cameras were attached via suction cups to eight wild dusky dolphins, deployed using a long pole with the aid of Velcro pads. The footage was captured off the coast of New Zealand from December 2015 to January 2016, with each camera system loaded with memory boards, very high frequency and satellite transmitters, time depth recorders and having a battery life of six hours. "One challenge of doing this research on small and fast animals like dusky dolphins is that there is limited surface area on the dolphin's body for tag attachment, so there's only a small window of time to actually deploy the tag as the dolphin swims past," said Peter Jones from the University of Sydney's School of Electrical and Information Engineering. "We have much to learn about animal behavior and systems such as this are a great way to observe their activity in a natural environment with the least likely influence on that behavior." Dolphin specialist Heidi Pearson, assistant professor of marine biology at the University of Alaska Southeast, said the research has great potential for protecting endangered species by giving scientists a much higher resolution of information than is possible than with other methods. "From the surface, researchers can only see about 10 percent of what is going on in an animal's life. With these video cameras, we can 'see' from the animals' perspective and begin to understand the challenges they face as they move throughout their habitat," she said. "For example, in marine areas subjected to high degrees of human disturbance such as shipping or coastal development, the ability to collect data from the animal's perspective will be critical in understanding how and to what extent these stressors affect an animal's ability to feed, mate, and raise young." The researchers now hope to further develop the cameras to test with marine predators including other cetacean species and sharks.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: phys.org

A research team including experts from the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre and the University of Alaska Southeast trialled the custom-made non-invasive cameras to capture and analyse more than 535 minutes of such rarely-seen activities as mother-calf interaction, playing with kelp, and intimate social behaviours like flipper-rubbing. The results are published in the latest Marine Biology. "For the first time, these cameras have given us the opportunity to see what dolphins do on their own terms," said Dr Gabriel Machovsky-Capuska from the University of Sydney's School of Veterinary Science and Charles Perkins Centre. "There were no wildlife crews, no invasive underwater housings - and the dolphins remained largely unaffected by our cameras. This research opens up a whole new approach for capturing wild animal behaviour, which will ultimately help us to not only advance conservation efforts but also come closer to understanding wild predators' and human nutrition too." The successful deployment advances new approaches to filming wild sea creatures, aiding conservation and rehabilitation efforts and giving researchers unprecedented insight into wild dolphins' prey and habitats. "Dolphins are marine top predators that are considered biomonitors of marine environments, so gaining a better understanding of their lives will help us to better comprehend the health of marine environments including prey species like fish and squid that are highly consumed by humans," said Dr Machovsky-Capuska, who is also co-leader of the Human-Animal Interactions research node at the Charles Perkin Centre. The cameras were attached via suction cups to eight wild dusky dolphins, deployed using a long pole with the aid of Velcro pads. The footage was captured off the coast of New Zealand from December 2015 to January 2016, with each camera system loaded with memory boards, very high frequency and satellite transmitters, time depth recorders and having a battery life of six hours. "One challenge of doing this research on small and fast animals like dusky dolphins is that there is limited surface area on the dolphin's body for tag attachment, so there's only a small window of time to actually deploy the tag as the dolphin swims past," said Dr Peter Jones from the University of Sydney's School of Electrical and Information Engineering. "We have much to learn about animal behaviour and systems such as this are a great way to observe their activity in a natural environment with the least likely influence on that behaviour." Dolphin specialist Heidi Pearson, Assistant Professor of Marine Biology at the University of Alaska Southeast, said the research has great potential for protecting endangered species by giving scientists a much higher resolution of information than is possible than with other methods. "From the surface, researchers can only see about 10 percent of what is going on in an animal's life. With these video cameras, we can 'see' from the animals' perspective and begin to understand the challenges they face as they move throughout their habitat," she said. "For example, in marine areas subjected to high degrees of human disturbance such as shipping or coastal development, the ability to collect data from the animal's perspective will be critical in understanding how and to what extent these stressors affect an animal's ability to feed, mate, and raise young." The researchers now hope to further develop the cameras to test with marine predators including other cetacean species and sharks. Explore further: Help to save rare humpback dolphins More information: Heidi C. Pearson et al, Testing and deployment of C-VISS (cetacean-borne video camera and integrated sensor system) on wild dolphins, Marine Biology (2017). DOI: 10.1007/s00227-017-3079-z

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