Toronto, Canada
Toronto, Canada

Infobright is a commercial provider of column-oriented relational database software with a focus in machine-generated data. The company's head office is located in Toronto, Canada. Most of its research and development is based in Warsaw, Poland. Wikipedia.

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News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

IoT Inventory highlights Midwest leadership in the Internet of Things CHICAGO, IL--(Marketwired - October 31, 2016) - The Illinois Technology Association (ITA) today announced the release of the second edition of the Midwest IoT Inventory Report: the report that catalogs and categorizes Internet of Things (IoT) companies in the Midwest. The Inventory was created by the ITA's IoT Council to formalize and visualize IoT's expanding presence in the Midwest. The revised version of the Inventory includes 90 companies that have established a clear commitment to creating, selling or implementing IoT solutions. Companies in the Inventory range from those founded in the past few years and with fewer than 50 employees, to others with more than 10,000 employees and a strong presence in Illinois since the late 1960s. Fifteen new companies were added to the Inventory since its initial release in April along with two case studies on IoT implementations in the Midwest at Sennco Solutions and Wells Electronics. The new companies listed in the inventory include: AirStash, Ampy, Ayrstone Productivity LLC, Climate Corporation, CNXT, Embedor Technologies, Entrigna, Hallsten Innovations, HARTING Inc of North America, Jio Inc, Mikan Associates, Net Zero Analysis & Design Corp, SPR Consulting, ThingLogix Inc, Vizlore LLC. "Through platforms like the IoT Council and initiatives like the IoT Inventory, the word is starting to spread that the Midwest is the place where IoT is happening," said ITA CEO, Fred Hoch. "The continued expansion of the IoT Inventory helps prove that the Midwest can take the IoT revolution far beyond consumer products to exploit the true power and scope of IoT." "It is exciting to see how many more companies we were able to add to the Inventory in such a short period of time," said Don DeLoach, CEO and president of Infobright and co-chair of the IoT Council. "When we established the IoT Council, one of its initial goals was to raise the visibility and awareness of the Midwest as an epicenter of IoT technology. The addition of fifteen companies to the Midwest IoT Inventory in six months is a big step in helping us reach that goal." To be considered for inclusion in the Inventory, companies had to meet one of two geographical criteria, either: The companies represented in the Inventory represent the leading edge of IoT in the Midwest. The ITA and its IoT Council are dedicated to helping current and future Midwest IoT companies achieve their goals through programming, support systems and peer-to-peer collaboration. Midwest companies that believe they should be represented in the inventory should submit their information for review. To learn more, download the full report visit itaiotcouncil.com or attend the upcoming IoT Summit Chicago on November 9th and 10th to experience Midwest IoT in action. The Illinois Technology Association (ITA) scales Illinois tech companies. With innovative resources that allow members to collaborate with each other, build their talent networks and elevate their local and national presence, ITA is the region's strongest advocate for fostering innovation and growth. Founded in 2005 and supporting 500-plus growth-stage tech companies, ITA has a rich history of driving the business forward. For more information, visit illinoistech.org, follow @ITAbuzz on Twitter or find us on LinkedIn.


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Depending on the connected office, an employee might be able to park their electric vehicle in a designated spot, have biometric scanning of their facial features automatically unlock the building's door, and sensors within the office recognize that they've arrived and log onto their computer as soon as they walk up to their desk. Here are some of the best smart offices products of the year, that will remain relevant into 2017. Qualcomm has a smart campus in San Diego that serves as a showroom for customers who want to see the possibilities of an intelligent environment. One of the products it features is Lumicast, Qualcomm's indoor positioning technology, which pairs with Current's LED light fixtures with sensors that can detect if someone is in a meeting room, based on whether the lights come on or not; if needed the room can immediately be released and made available for someone else. Current's sensors detect and analyze occupancy levels to control lighting and HVAC in real time with air-quality sensors for temperature, humidity, and CO2 working with the ventilations systems to make sure the air temperature is suitable for the number of people in the building. SEE: How smart offices of the future can make companies more intelligent (TechRepublic) This high-tech solution offers a collaborative workspace with 360-degree screens and was designed by John Underkoffler, the creator of the technology seen in "Minority Report." His company, Oblong Industries, created a large multi-screen workspace where employees can work together by using hand gestures to move documents and images around. The technology has been popular, with IBM, Accenture, and Boeing among Oblong's customers. Earlier this year, NASA awarded Oblong a contract to install 10 Mezzanine systems across four NASA Aeronautics research centers in Virginia, Ohio, and California. Aruba's mobile engagement solution includes Aruba Location Services that are powered by Aruba Beacons and the Meridian mobile app platform, which enables enterprises to quickly and easily create mobile apps or improve existing apps. Some of the features include indoor turn-by-turn directions to allow employees and visitors to more easily navigate a corporate building or campus, reach meetings on time, and find bathrooms and breakrooms. It's particularly useful for new employees and employees visiting from other locations. Proximity-based notifications can be used to provide personalized information such as details on sites of interest, corporate updates, and pending events. Location sharing allows employees to locate coworkers, and location-aware printing will only print a project once the user is standing next to a printer. Some companies are using Aruba beacons and the Meridian mobile app platform to create a set of mobile apps that assist the smart enterprise. For example, the Aruba and Robin partnership allows users to find and book available meeting rooms based on real-time information, and in-room displays and meeting tools manage themselves in real-time as people enter and exit meetings. Oracle has created a lab environment to test various cloud applications to figure out new ways for people to communicate, geo locate, and handle daily tasks at work. Some of the cooler tech being evaluated includes hands-free, mind-sensing headwear to explore how brainwave control can allow for hands-free navigation and movement of objects. It's not just about custom-made systems. At Oracle, they also use off-the-shelf products such as Amazon Alexa for smart office applications. Part of being smart is avoiding reinventing the wheel. "Our OAUX team explores the potential of new technologies. We connect commercially available technologies with Oracle Cloud enterprise systems and work to better understand how we can evolve the user experience in our smart office labs. We research and build workplace interactions and scenarios using gesture control, virtual assistants, and location-based authentication—with emerging technologies such as Anki, Leap Motion, Raspberry Pi and more—and think innovatively about the experiences we want to create for our users," said Jeremy Ashley, group vice president, OAUX. Indoor mapping, such as Micello's, is a valuable tool. It's not just for employees in offices, but visitors to public buildings such as hotels and conference centers. "We will begin to see the rise, probably quickly, into the world of indoor mapping, where now your path from your hotel room to the meeting will start at your room on the 39th floor and take you to that meeting room on the 7th floor of Building 3 of the Galleria Complex. And while in route, you will know where the men's room is, that there is a newsstand in the basement, and that the concierge at the hotel is located in the northwest corner of the lobby," said Don DeLoach, president and CEO of Infobright. There's a new beacon-powered version of ReadyTalk's FoxDen Connect to provide video interactions on mobile devices and in huddle rooms, by identifying who is in the room and automatically connecting the participants together for HD video conferencing between iOS and Android mobile devices or Chrome browsers. It can save the user up to 10 minutes or more of time that it can take to manually connect a video conference with participants. The company is beta testing facial recognition software so that everyone can be automatically added to a video conference when they walk into a meeting room. As cool as all of the current tech is, there's always something coming up next. "In the coming years, virtual reality and augmented reality will fundamentally alter how employees do their jobs. While the technology is still in the early stages, the opportunities to improve worker output are exciting. One example is giving employees like police officers or other emergency workers immersive training experiences. We're also seeing VR applied in the real estate sector. A company called Floored is creating 3D tours of office spaces that haven't even been constructed yet, allowing potential tenants to get a 'real life' experience and visually see potential design tweaks. There's still a long way to go, but in the next year and beyond, virtual and augmented reality will reshape the worker experience as we know it," said Arie Barendrecht, CEO and co-founder of WiredScore.


News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

More cities are adding smart city features so that Internet of Things (IoT) sensors and other connected technologies can improve the lives of citizens and visitors. As everyone knows, technology moves fast and finding out what's in store next is crucial to stay in the game. The concept of a smart city has been around for more than a decade, but it was only recently that the phrase "smart city" became part of the modern lexicon. The trend toward adding smart city technology began in Europe, with Barcelona, Spain one of the earliest adopters. Dubai, Singapore, Hamburg, and Copenhagen quickly followed suit. In the US, Chicago, San Francisco, New York, Seattle, and Denver are among those that added intelligent tech early on, and now there are cities around the globe adding new tech to streamline everything from traffic, parking, and streetlights, to public utilities, safety, and city services. There are several major themes expected to take precedence in 2017. TechRepublic talked to smart city experts to get their opinions on what's likely to happen in the next 12 months as the chasm is crossed from early adopters to early mainstream in the US. More cities are seeking an integrated, cross-cutting approach to develop technology and share information. "They realize the cost and danger of doing smart city projects piecemeal on a department-by-department basis. They want to share infrastructure, share costs, and share data between departments. As part of an integrated approach, cities will be seeking multi-purpose platforms instead of single-purpose, custom applications. They wish to have hardware, software, and tools that can be used by multiple departments," said Jesse Berst, chairman of the Smart Cities Council. This is happening with varied departments such as the police, street maintenance, and IT, depending on the city and the needs of citizens. When one IoT sensor sends information to a department, the data is only valuable if the right person sees it. Finding out through a sensor that there is a gunshot on a city street means that the city services department that monitors the sensors on the streetlight must be able to relay that information to a 911 operator. "This only makes sense when you consider that IoT normally sits at the cross section between operational technology and information technology. That gunshot detection system mounted in the streetlights needs strategic, operational, and financial consideration from multiple parties," said Don DeLoach, president and CEO of Infobright and part of the Illinois Technology Association's IoT Council. Berst said that more cities will be seriously considering cloud option and X-as-a-Service, including Software-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service, and Infrastructure-as-a-Service, but procurement regulations are holding them back. "Next year, many cities will begin to address the policy changes needed to be able to move to the cloud," Berst said. In the state of Illinois, on October 1, the need for individual cities to file a Request for Proposal (RFP) for tech was eliminated with the creation of a statewide RFP for each type of tech, as previously reported in TechRepublic. Not only will silos be eliminated within city departments, but cities will work with other municipalities to share information and technology. "As IoT becomes mainstream, we are moving from a time when cities who were putting money on IoT initiatives were the "leaders" in advancing smart cities, to a time where the cities not investing in smart city solutions are the ones being left behind. As this happens, we are seeing more and more collaboration amongst cities, where a lesson learned in Rio may have an impact on an upcoming project in Atlanta. We should see this increase in 2017," DeLoach said. Collaboration between cities and private industry is picking up as well, as cities and companies recognize there are opportunities to come together where everyone benefits, he said. "This may be with the mapping of underground services in Chicago or the LINK kiosks in New York, but there is more and more government to commercial company collaboration going on in smart cities, and 2017 will only see that increase," DeLoach said. Get ready for the city of the future. "The power and capabilities of machine learning will grow exponentially. We won't be the Jetson's in 2017, but the pace of the impact will not slow down," said Mark Kamlet, professor of economics and public policy for Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University. "In fact, it will be just the opposite. No one thought machine learning would beat the world's top players in the game of 'Go' for decades, or during our lifetimes, or maybe never," Kamlet said. "As cities continue to innovate in the big data realm, machine learning applications are increasing and converging with the IoT. Machine learning will, for example, help to intelligently mine IoT data to drive better informed planning decisions for cities, municipalities, utilities, and community citizens. Machine learning will also be key to enabling more adaptive, resilient systems," said Jennifer James, director of Smart City Solutions for Black & Veatch. In 2017, smart cities will leverage data to improve civic services, said Arie Barendrecht, CEO and co-founder of WiredScore. "From crime detection software to programs that identify inefficiencies in parking, cities are increasingly using data to become more efficient. Office buildings are also paving the way in using data to make cities smarter. For instance, the Hudson Yards development in New York City employs a range of sensors that collect information on people's behaviors, adjusting services based on those inputs. This includes altering energy usage in specific sections of buildings depending on occupancy. Yet, the trend I expect to see in 2017 that will have the biggest impact is cities increasingly making all of their data available to the general public. In doing so, they will give entrepreneurs the information they need to develop the next round of smart city technologies. The possibilities for groundbreaking innovation are endless," Barendrecht said. Talk is buzzing about connected vehicles and autonomous cars. Some cities are interested in creating technology to support self-driving cars, such as with Pittsburgh's partnership with Uber for a self-driving pilot and the $10.9 million in funding it's received from the US Department of Transportation to fund smart traffic lights. But what does this all really mean? "Smart cars are on the horizon. But, in order for autonomous vehicles to flourish, they must at least be able to trust the integrity of the infrastructure, and at best work with those surrounding structures as part of an interconnected technological web. Uber may be ready to roll out the car of the future, but according to everything we know about Pittsburgh's infrastructure, the streets cannot support them. In fact, 60 Minutes claimed in 2014 that Pittsburgh 'may have the most serious problem in the country' when it comes to outdated and crumbling bridges and roads. And Pittsburgh is not alone: According to the National League of Cities, only 6% of the country's most populous cities have accounted for these types of vehicles in their long-term plans. Connected cars are only the beginning of a nation-wide transformation of our cities, and there is a lot of work to do in 2017," said Kurt Steward, vice president of the public sector at Infor. It's truly a race toward automated vehicles, at least among some cities. "It's being led by fierce competition among the Bay Area's big three transportation companies: Tesla, Uber, and Google. Tesla is expanding its Fremont factory to increase vehicle production up to 500,000 cars a year. Tesla is also providing regular updates to their "Autopilot" automated vehicle capabilities as a software upgrade for Tesla vehicle owners. Uber is continuing its move toward having an automated, on-demand vehicle service. Google is working to get their technology into mass production. This is a very exciting time as market competition accelerates the timing and rapidly improves the quality of automated vehicle choices," said Hans Larsen, public works director for the City of Fremont, CA. Sol Salinas, connected cities lead at Accenture Mobility, said: "There will be an emphasis on 'last mile' connectivity as 2017 is used to plan ahead for technologies that are currently in pilot phases, such as autonomous vehicles. Autonomous neighborhood fleets, for example, might start to bridge the gap between homes and public transport hubs, allowing passengers to travel more conveniently and safely." "As connected vehicles become more common, we will start to see real-time status information from central traffic management systems being shared with people, through their cars. Data can already be combined from sensors in vehicles to generate real-time information on current road conditions, traffic, and accidents, and in 2017 smart cities will prepare themselves to take advantage of these new data sets. This will help to make life easier for everyone working, living, and visiting the cities, from helping to avoid traffic jams or crowded areas, to finding a parking space," Salinas said. Kurtis McBride, CEO at Miovision, said, "It's difficult to predict exactly which technologies might mature enough to have a widespread impact in the next year, but I think it's safe to assume that the way people move about their cities and interact with different parts of mobility networks will see some major shifts."


A method of resolving data queries in a data processing system. The method comprises receiving in the data processing system a data query, where the data processing system stores a plurality of information units describing pluralities of data elements, a first information unit having a retrieval subunit that includes information for retrieving all unique data elements in a first plurality of data elements and a summary subunit including summarized information about data elements in the first plurality of data elements. The method further includes deriving, via the data processing system, a result of the data query, wherein the result of the data query comprises a plurality of new data elements. The data processing system uses summary subunits of information units to select a set of information units describing data elements that are sufficient to resolve the data query.


In a method for storing data in a relational database system using a processor, a collection of values is assigned to a structure dictionary, wherein each of the values represents the value of a row for an attribute and has a unique ordinal number within the collection, and wherein the structure dictionary contains structures defined based on at least one of interaction with a user of the system via an interface, automatic detection of structures occurring in data, and predetermined information about structures relevant to data content that is stored in the system. For each structure in the structure dictionary, a structure match list is formed from ordinal numbers of values matching the structure, and a structure sub-collection from values matching the structure, using the processor. An outlier match list is formed from ordinal numbers of values that are not null and do not match any structure in the structure dictionary, and an outlier sub-collection from values that are not null and do not match any structure in the structure dictionary. The collection of values is stored in the relational database in a form of structure match lists, structure sub-collections, outlier match list and outlier sub-collection.


In a method for storing data in a relational database system using a processor, a collection of values is assigned to a structure dictionary, wherein each of the values represents the value of a row for an attribute and has a unique ordinal number within the collection, and wherein the structure dictionary contains structures defined based on at least one of interaction with a user of the system via an interface, automatic detection of structures occurring in data, and predetermined information about structures relevant to data content that is stored in the system. For each structure in the structure dictionary, a structure match list is formed from ordinal numbers of values matching the structure, and a structure sub-collection from values matching the structure, using the processor. An outlier match list is formed from ordinal numbers of values that are not null and do not match any structure in the structure dictionary, and an outlier sub-collection from values that are not null and do not match any structure in the structure dictionary. The collection of values is stored in the relational database in a form of structure match lists, structure sub-collections, outlier match list and outlier sub-collection.


A method comprises grouping, via a data processing system, a plurality of data elements in a same data type into a plurality of data units. The method further comprises gathering, via the data processing system, information about data elements in a first data unit into a first information unit. The first information unit comprising a representation of information that is less than all unique information in the first data unit. The method also comprises storing, via the data processing system, the first information unit on a computer readable storage device. The method additionally comprises identifying, via the data processing system, based at least in part on the first information unit, whether the data elements in the first data unit are required to be retrieved to resolve a first data query received by the data processing system and to resolve the first data query.


A method for applying adaptive data compression in a relational database system using a filter cascade having at least one compression filter stage in the filter cascade. The method comprises applying a data filter associated with the compression filter stage to the data input to produce reconstruction information and filtered data, then compressing the reconstruction information to be included in a filter stream. The filtered data is provided as a compression filter stage output. The method may comprise evaluating whether the compression filter stage provides improved compression compared to the data input. The filter stage output may be used as the input of a subsequent compression filter stage.


In a method for storing data in a relational database system using a processor, a collection of values is assigned to a structure dictionary, each of the values represents the value of a row for an attribute and has a unique ordinal number within the collection. and the structure dictionary contains structures defined based on at least one of interaction with a user of the system via an interface, automatic detection of structures occurring in data, automatic detection of frequencies of values occurring in data, analysis of a history of queries, and predetermined information about structures relevant to data content that is stored in the system. For each structure, forming a structure match list from ordinal numbers of values matching the structure, and a structure sub-collection from values matching the structure, using the processor. An outlier match list is formed from ordinal numbers of values that are not null and do not match any structure in the structure dictionary, and an outlier sub-collection is formed from values that are not null and do not match any structure in the structure dictionary. The collection of values is stored in the relational database in a form of structure match lists, structure sub-collections, outlier match list and outlier sub-collection.


A system and method of processing a data query in a data processing system is provided. The data in the data processing system includes a plurality of individual data elements. The data elements are grouped and stored in at least one data unit. The information about the at least one data unit is gathered and stored in at least one information unit. The method comprises receiving the data query to be executed; using the information in the at least one information unit to optimize and execute the query; resolving the data query; and returning results of the data query for use by the data processing system.

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