Inera

Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso
Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

Time filter

Source Type

Tindano K.,University of Liège | Moula N.,University of Liège | Leroy P.,University of Liège | Traore A.,INERA | Antoine-Moussiaux N.,University of Liège
Animal | Year: 2017

Farm animal genetic resources are threatened worldwide. Participation in markets, while representing a crucial way out of poverty for many smallholders, affects genetic management choices with associated sustainability concerns. This paper proposes a contextualized study of the interactions between markets and animal genetic resources management, in the case of sheep markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. It focusses on the organization of marketing chains and the valuation of genetic characteristics by value chain actors. Marketing chain characterization was tackled through semi-structured interviews with 25 exporters and 15 butchers, both specialized in sheep. Moreover, revealed preference methods were applied to analyse the impact of animals’ attributes on market pricing. Data were collected from 338 transactions during three different periods: Eid al-Adha, Christmas and New Year period, and a neutral period. The neutral period is understood as a period not close to any event likely to influence the demand for sheep. The results show that physical characteristics such as live weight, height at withers and coat colour have a strong influence on the animals’ prices. Live weight has also had an increasing marginal impact on price. The different markets (local butcher, feasts, export market, sacrifices) represent distinct demands for genetic characteristics, entailing interesting consequences for animal genetic resource management. Any breeding programme should therefore take this diversity into account to allow this sector to contribute better to a sustainable development of the country. © The Animal Consortium 2017


Perez-Pardal L.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal | Perez-Pardal L.,University of Minnesota | Royo L.J.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal | Beja-Pereira A.,University of Porto | And 12 more authors.
Heredity | Year: 2010

In this study, we show how Y-specific interspersed multilocus microsatellites, which are loci that yield several amplified bands differing in size from the same male individual and PCR reaction, are a powerful source of information for tracing the history of cattle. Our results confirm the existence of three main groups of sires, which are separated by evolutionary time and clearly predate domestication. These three groups are consistent with the haplogroups previously identified by Götherström et al. (2005) using five Y-specific segregating sites: Y1 and Y2 in taurine (Bos taurus) cattle and Y3 in zebu (Bos indicus) cattle. The zebu cattle cluster clearly originates from a domestication process that was geographically and temporally separated from that of taurine clusters. Our analyses further suggest that: (i) introgression of wild sire genetic material into domesticated herds may have a significant role in the formation of modern cattle, including the formation of the Y1 haplogroup; (ii) a putative domestication event in Africa probably included local Y2-like wild sires; (iii) the West African zebu cattle Y-chromosome may have partially originated from an ancient introgression of humped cattle into Africa; and (iv) the high genetic similarity among Asian zebu sires is consistent with a single domestication process. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


PubMed | INRAB Benin, British Petroleum, University of Koudougou, Fundacion CETEMAS and 2 more.
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Tropical animal health and production | Year: 2015

A total of 1015 adult cows belonging to nine West African cattle breeds were assessed for 16 body measurements and 18 qualitative traits to ascertain the existence of geographical patterns of variation. Sampling was carried out in 29 different provinces of Mali, Burkina Faso and Benin. For body measurements, taurine breeds took lower average values than the zebu breeds. Sanga cattle took intermediate values. Qualitative traits did not allow to differentiate among cattle groups (taurine, zebu or sanga) or breeds. Principal component analysis identified two factors explaining 56.4 and 9.2% of the variance for body measurements, respectively. Two correspondence analysis dimensions computed on qualitative traits explained a small proportion of the variability (20.8 and 13.5%, respectively). Contour plots were constructed using the eigenvalues computed for each individual and either factor or dimension identified; confidence regions calculated confirmed that body measurements clearly differentiated zebu and taurine cattle breeds while qualitative traits did not. Factor 1 was projected on a geographical map, using provinces as nodes, to assess breed-free variation for body measurements. A pattern of continuous variation from the Sahel area southwards was identified. Probably, breeding decisions promoting the crosses between zebu-like and taurine cattle are underlying this geographical pattern of variation. The implementation of selection strategies aiming at the increase of the productivity of native West African taurine cattle breeds while avoiding looses in trypanotolerant ability would be highly advisable.


Alvarez I.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal | Perez-Pardal L.,University of Porto | Traore A.,INERA | Fernandez I.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal | Goyache F.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal
Infection, Genetics and Evolution | Year: 2016

A panel of 81 Asian, African and European cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus) was analysed for the whole sequence of the CXCR4 gene (3844 bp), a strong candidate for cattle trypanotolerance. Thirty-one polymorphic sites identified gave 31 different haplotypes. Neutrality tests rejected the hypothesis of either positive or purifying selection. Bayesian phylogenetic tree showed differentiation of haplotypes into two clades gathering genetic variability predating domestication. Related with clades definition, linkage disequilibrium analyses suggested the existence of one only linkage block on the CXCR4 gene. Two tag SNPs identified on exon 2 captured 50% of variability. Whatever the analysis carried out, no clear separation between cattle groups was identified. Most haplotypes identified in West African taurine cattle were also found in European cattle and in Asian and West African zebu. West African taurine samples did not carry unique variants on the CXCR4 gene sequence. The current analysis failed in identifying a causal mutation on the CXCR4 gene underlying a previously reported QTL for cattle trypanotolerance on BTA2. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Alvarez I.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal | Perez-Pardal L.,University of Porto | Traore A.,INERA | Fernandez I.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal | Goyache F.,Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal
Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics | Year: 2016

Bovine trypanotolerance is a heritable trait associated to the ability of the individuals to control parasitaemia and anaemia. The INHBA (BTA4) and TICAM1 (BTA7) genes are strong candidates for trypanotolerance-related traits. The coding sequence of both genes (3951 bp in total) were analysed in a panel including 79 Asian, African and European cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus) to identify naturally occurring polymorphisms on both genes. In general, the genetic diversity was low. Nineteen of the 33 mutations identified were found just one time. Seventeen different haplotypes were defined for the TICAM1 gene, and 9 and 12 were defined for the exon 1 and the exon 2 of the INHBA gene, respectively. There was no clear separation between cattle groups. The most frequent haplotypes identified in West African taurine samples were also identified in other cattle groups including Asian zebu and European cattle. Phylogenetic trees and principal component analysis confirmed that divergence among the cattle groups analysed was poor, particularly for the INHBA sequences. The European cattle subset had the lowest values of haplotype diversity for both the exon1 (monomorphic) and the exon2 (0.077 ± 0.066) of the INHBA gene. Neutrality tests, in general, did not suggest that the analysed genes were under positive selection. The assessed scenario would be consistent with the identification of recent mutations in evolutionary terms. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


PubMed | University of Porto, INERA and Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of animal breeding and genetics = Zeitschrift fur Tierzuchtung und Zuchtungsbiologie | Year: 2016

Bovine trypanotolerance is a heritable trait associated to the ability of the individuals to control parasitaemia and anaemia. The INHBA (BTA4) and TICAM1 (BTA7) genes are strong candidates for trypanotolerance-related traits. The coding sequence of both genes (3951bp in total) were analysed in a panel including 79 Asian, African and European cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus) to identify naturally occurring polymorphisms on both genes. In general, the genetic diversity was low. Nineteen of the 33 mutations identified were found just one time. Seventeen different haplotypes were defined for the TICAM1 gene, and 9 and 12 were defined for the exon 1 and the exon 2 of the INHBA gene, respectively. There was no clear separation between cattle groups. The most frequent haplotypes identified in West African taurine samples were also identified in other cattle groups including Asian zebu and European cattle. Phylogenetic trees and principal component analysis confirmed that divergence among the cattle groups analysed was poor, particularly for the INHBA sequences. The European cattle subset had the lowest values of haplotype diversity for both the exon1 (monomorphic) and the exon2 (0.0770.066) of the INHBA gene. Neutrality tests, in general, did not suggest that the analysed genes were under positive selection. The assessed scenario would be consistent with the identification of recent mutations in evolutionary terms.


PubMed | University of Porto, INERA and Area de Genetica y Reproduccion Animal
Type: | Journal: Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases | Year: 2016

A panel of 81 Asian, African and European cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus) was analysed for the whole sequence of the CXCR4 gene (3844bp), a strong candidate for cattle trypanotolerance. Thirty-one polymorphic sites identified gave 31 different haplotypes. Neutrality tests rejected the hypothesis of either positive or purifying selection. Bayesian phylogenetic tree showed differentiation of haplotypes into two clades gathering genetic variability predating domestication. Related with clades definition, linkage disequilibrium analyses suggested the existence of one only linkage block on the CXCR4 gene. Two tag SNPs identified on exon 2 captured 50% of variability. Whatever the analysis carried out, no clear separation between cattle groups was identified. Most haplotypes identified in West African taurine cattle were also found in European cattle and in Asian and West African zebu. West African taurine samples did not carry unique variants on the CXCR4 gene sequence. The current analysis failed in identifying a causal mutation on the CXCR4 gene underlying a previously reported QTL for cattle trypanotolerance on BTA2.


Pinel-Galzi A.,Montpellier University | Traore O.,INERA | Sere Y.,University of Dar es Salaam | Hebrard E.,Montpellier University | Fargette D.,Montpellier University
Current Opinion in Virology | Year: 2015

Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) exemplifies the key role in plant virus emergence of the early steps of crop extension and intensification in traditional agriculture. In East Africa, RYMV emerged in the 19th century after rice intensification along the Indian Ocean coast, and later spread inland concomitantly with rice introduction. In West Africa, the contrasted history of rice cultivation among regions differently shaped RYMV populations. A biogeographical approach - which jointly considers the spatial distribution of the virus and its hosts over time - was applied to reach these conclusions. We linked the evolution of RYMV over the past two centuries to a geographical map of the history of rice cultivation in Africa. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.


Sanon H.O.,INERA | Sanou S.,INERA
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2012

Feeding behavior of goats on natural pasture was studied during three consecutive seasons of the year: dry, rainy and post-rainy. Concurrently, observations were made on the availability of five browse forages by following their phenological phases. Availability of browse forages components (green leaves, litter, flowers and fruits/pods) varied with the species phenological stage. Acacia raddiana, Balanit es aegyptiaca and Ziziphus mauritiana showed a long cycle compared to A. laeta and A. seyal, which lost their leaves early. In general, browse forage in terms of green leaves, litter and fruits/pods was available from July to March. This forage was particularly beneficial from December to March when herbaceous biomass decreases in quantity and quality. The feeding behavior of goats varied according to forage availability. The main activity of goats was browsing, 40% of their grazing time in rainy season and 60% in dry season. Grazing was the second activity with a maximum (22 to 38%) in the rainy season, from July to September. Resting time was high in dry season, with a maximum in March, probably due to high temperatures.


Brun-Barale A.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | Hema O.,INERA | Martin T.,UR 103 HORTSYS CIRAD | Suraporn S.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | And 3 more authors.
Pest Management Science | Year: 2010

BACKGROUND: Resistance to the pyrethroid insecticide deltamethrin has been a growing problem in the management of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) pest populations in West Africa. Detoxification by P450 enzymes appears to be a major mechanism of resistance, but the genes responsible for resistance are unknown. RESULTS: First, it was shown that deltamethrin resistance in strains from Burkina Faso (Kaya) and from Spain (Seville) were suppressible by piperonyl butoxide and by trichlorophenyl propynyl ether, thus indicating a major role of P450 enzyme(s) in resistance. The larval expression of 21 CYP genes encoding P450 enzymes from six CYP families were then compared by quantitative RT-PCR. Five genes, CYP4L5, CYP4L11, CYP6AE11, CYP332A1 and CYP9A14, were significantly overexpressed in the Kaya and Seville strains when compared with Heliar, a susceptible strain. Significant overexpression of multiple CYP genes (CYP4M6, CYP4M7, CYP6AE11, CYP9A12, CYP332A1 and CYP337B1) was also found in six field strains with different levels of resistance from Benin, Burkina Faso and Mali. CONCLUSION: Although functional or genetic evidence for the role of these P450s in resistance remains to be formally established, results suggest that multiple P450 enzymes contribute to deltamethrin resistance. This study is a first step towards the development of molecular tools for the detection of P450-based resistance in H. armigera. © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

Loading Inera collaborators
Loading Inera collaborators