Bucaramanga, Colombia

Industrial University of Santander

www.uis.edu.co/
Bucaramanga, Colombia

The Industrial University of Santander , also called UIS, is a public, coeducational, research university based primarily in Bucaramanga, Santander, Colombia. It is the largest by student population, and the top ranking university in northeast Colombia. The university was created by ordinance No. 83 of June 22, 1944, by the Departmental Assembly, and began its labors in March 1948. Its main campus, known also as Campus Universitario Principal , is located in the northeast part of the city and hosts the faculties of science, Engineering, and Humanities. Its also possesses a second campus, which hosts the faculty of Health, and a building known as the Sede Bucarica, which is a national monument. The university also has satellite campuses across the department in the cities of Barrancabermeja, Barbosa, Málaga, Piedecuesta, Socorro. The university offers education at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, with 124 academic programs, which includes 21 master, 9 medical residency programs, and 6 doctorates. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRA-2007-1.2.3;INFRA-2007-1.2-03 | Award Amount: 5.11M | Year: 2008

EELA-2 aims to build, on the current EELA e-Infrastructure, a high capacity, production-quality, scalable Grid Facility providing round-the-clock, worldwide access to distributed computing, storage and network resources for a wide spectrum of applications from European and Latin American scientific communities. The project will provide an empowered Grid Facility with versatile services fulfilling application requirements and ensure the long-term sustainability of the e-Infrastructure beyond the term of the project. The specific EELA-2 objectives are: - Build a Grid Facility by: Expanding the current EELA e-Infrastructure to consist of more production sites mobilising more computing nodes and more storage space, at start of the project and to further grow storage over the duration of the project; Providing, in collaboration with related projects (e.g. EGEE), the full set of Grid Services needed by all types of scientific applications; Supporting applications various types (from classical off-line data processing up to control and data acquisition of scientific instruments), selected against well defined criteria (including grid added value, suitability for Grid deployment, outreach/potential impact); - Ensure the Grid Facility sustainability: Through the already established and new contacts with policy/decision makers, collaborating with RedCLARA and NRENs and supporting the ongoing creation of e-Science Initiatives and/or National Grid initiatives (NGI). Building the support of the e-Infrastructure to provide a complete set of Global Services from a Central Operation Centre and to pave the way for the creation of Regional Operation Centres in Latin America: Attracting new applications; Making available knowledge of EELA-2 Grid Facility to all potential users, developers, and decision makers through an extensive Training and Dissemination program; Creating knowledge repositories federated with the EGEE ones.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.2.3 | Award Amount: 2.76M | Year: 2010

The GISELA objective is to guarantee the long-term sustainability of the European Latin American e-Infrastructure and thus ensure the continuity and enhancement of the Virtual Research Communities (VRC) using it. The project will focus on:\n\tImplementing the Latin American Grid Initiative (LGI) sustainability model rooted on National Grid Initiatives (NGI) or Equivalent Domestic Grid Structures (EDGS), in association with CLARA and collaborating with EGI;\n\tProviding VRCs with the e-Infrastructure and Application-related Services required to improve the effectiveness of their research, addressing both:\no\tCurrent EELA-2 small User Communities;\no\tLarger VRCs through Specialised Support Centres (SSCs).\nThe GISELA mission is twofold:\n- Ensure the sustainability of the EU-LA e-Infrastructure\nThe sustainability of the EU part of the e-Infrastructure being cared of by EGI, GISELA will concentrate on its LA component. The tasks, at each level of the e-Infrastructure are:\n\tInstitution: Get all Services fully operational in the Resource Centre (RC);\n\tCountry: Implement all Grid Operation Centre (GOC) Services;\n\tContinent: Implement all Grid & Network Support Centres (GSC, NSC) Services;\n\tSupport a catchall GOC.\n- Support Virtual Research Communities\nThe support will encompass:\n\tUser Support:\no\tProvide access to the EU-LA Infrastructure to VOs represented in GISELA (HEP, Life Sciences, Earth Sciences, etc.);\no\tPublicise and support the GISELA e-Infrastructure and Application Services;\no\tCollaborate with VRCs or SSCs to the development of integrated services (e.g. gateways).\n\tTraining & Dissemination activities\no\tOrganisation of tutorials for single users and VRCs;\no\tCoordinate dissemination actions, workshops, Conferences;\no\tProduce dissemination material.\nGrid Services for VRCs will be provided by CLARA on the basis of a business plan using a Life Cycle Product Management (LCPM) approach.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-22-2016 | Award Amount: 15.59M | Year: 2016

ZIKAlliance is a multidisciplinary project with a global One Health approach, built: on a multi-centric network of clinical cohorts in the Caribbean, Central & South America; research sites in countries where the virus has been or is currently circulating (Africa, Asia, Polynesia) or at risk for emergence (Reunion Island); a strong network of European and Brazilian clinical & basic research institutions; and multiple interfaces with other scientific and public health programmes. ZIKAlliance will addrees three key objectives relating to (i) impact of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy and short & medium term effects on newborns, (ii) associated natural history of ZIKV infection in humans and their environment in the context of other circulating arboviruses and (iii) building the overall capacity for preparedness research for future epidemic threats in Latin America & the Caribbean. The project will take advantage of large standardised clinical cohorts of pregnant women and febrile patients in regions of Latin America and the Caribbean were the virus is circulating, expanding a preexisting network established by the IDAMS EU project. I will also benefit of a very strong expertise in basic and environmental sciences, with access to both field work and sophisticated technological infrastructures to characterise virus replication and physiopathology mechanisms. To meet its 3 key objectives, the scientific project has been organised in 9 work packages, with WP2/3 dedicated to clinical research (cohorts, clinical biology, epidemiology & modeling), WP3/4 to basic research (virology & antivirals, pathophysiology & animal models), WP5/6 to environmental research (animal reservoirs, vectors & vector control) , WP7/8 to social sciences & communication, and WP9 to management. The broad consortium set-up allow gathering the necessary expertise for an actual interdisciplinary approach, and operating in a range of countries with contrasting ZIKV epidemiological status.


Rodrigues R.C.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Ortiz C.,Industrial University of Santander | Berenguer-Murcia A.,University of Alicante | Torres R.,Industrial University of Santander | Fernandez-Lafuente R.,Institute Catalisis CSIC
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

Immobilization of enzymes may produce alterations in their observed activity, specificity or selectivity. Although in many cases an impoverishment of the enzyme properties is observed upon immobilization (caused by the distortion of the enzyme due to the interaction with the support) in some instances such properties may be enhanced by this immobilization. These alterations in enzyme properties are sometimes associated with changes in the enzyme structure. Occasionally, these variations will be positive. For example, they may be related to the stabilization of a hyperactivated form of the enzyme, like in the case of lipases immobilized on hydrophobic supports via interfacial activation. In some other instances, these improvements will be just a consequence of random modifications in the enzyme properties that in some reactions will be positive while in others may be negative. For this reason, the preparation of a library of biocatalysts as broad as possible may be a key turning point to find an immobilized biocatalyst with improved properties when compared to the free enzyme. Immobilized enzymes will be dispersed on the support surface and aggregation will no longer be possible, while the free enzyme may suffer aggregation, which greatly decreases enzyme activity. Moreover, enzyme rigidification may lead to preservation of the enzyme properties under drastic conditions in which the enzyme tends to become distorted thus decreasing its activity. Furthermore, immobilization of enzymes on a support, mainly on a porous support, may in many cases also have a positive impact on the observed enzyme behavior, not really related to structural changes. For example, the promotion of diffusional problems (e.g., pH gradients, substrate or product gradients), partition (towards or away from the enzyme environment, for substrate or products), or the blocking of some areas (e.g., reducing inhibitions) may greatly improve enzyme performance. Thus, in this tutorial review, we will try to list and explain some of the main reasons that may produce an improvement in enzyme activity, specificity or selectivity, either real or apparent, due to immobilization. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Patent
Industrial University of Santander | Date: 2015-09-23

The invention relates to a material consisting of hard fibers on which nanoparticles of metals or metal oxides, preferably period IV transition metal oxides, are deposited, using different techniques, said material being used in the degradation and removal of contaminants found in liquid matrices. The invention also relates to a method for the in situ synthesis thereof.

Loading Industrial University of Santander collaborators
Loading Industrial University of Santander collaborators