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News Article | January 13, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

While most people are eagerly anticipating the reveal of which stars will be competing for Oscar gold, competition between that other onscreen darling—visual effects—got underway this past weekend with the annual VFX Bake-Off. The three-hour event—thrown by The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Visual Effects Branch at the Academy’s Beverly Hills headquarters—enables 10 Oscar semi-finalist visual effects teams to explain to industry members and enthusiasts the engineering challenges in achieving complicated CGI shots and integrating them with live action. "When the famous red light goes on, you’ll need to wrap up," said VFX Branch founder Richard Edlund, motioning to a large red beacon on a stand. "For those who remember when Jim Cameron walked over and unscrewed it…well, it’s epoxied in place now." Each VFX teams had five minutes to introduce their 10-minute clips and explain the challenges of their projects, and answer three minutes of questions from VFX Branch’s 40-member steering committee. That night, they cast secret ballots for the five Oscar nominees, to be announced on Thursday, with the winner named during the 88th Annual Academy Awards broadcast February 28. The 10 films in contention were: Walt Disney’s Ant-Man, Tomorrowland, Avengers: Age of Ultron, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens; 20th Century Fox’s The Martian and The Revenant; Universal’s Jurassic World; Sony’s The Walk; A24’s Ex Machina; and Warner Bros.’ Mad Max: Fury Road. "This year, the main thread is the integration and disappearance of visual effects into live action. There are more visual effects than ever, but they are increasingly in the service of the film," David Morin Autodesk’s director of industry relations and business development for its media and entertainment division, told Fast Company post-event. Autodesk is the maker of Maya, the industry standard program for 3-D animation and VFX, and used by all 10 contenders. Morin noted two other trends. VFX, in the past a purview of post-production, is becoming increasingly integrated into the creative process at earlier points in the filmmaking, beginning with pre-visualization. And using the Cloud in place of expensive rendering farms has brought VFX costs down to the point where small studios can do the effects work once relegated to large ones. Following are some tidbits about each film from the teams’ designated speakers: Ant-Man’s shrinkage shots were accomplished by 25-member macro unit team, including an ant wrangler, shooting for 40 days on a to-scale miniature set, and integrating some half million photographs and 1000 frame-per-sec macro special effects. Tomorrowland, which was shot in 4K, partnered with Dolby Vision’s Extended Dynamic Range to capture the expanded color range and contrast. Jurassic World assigned motion-capture actors for each raptor, to facilitate improvised and unique signatures of movement. As a nostalgic nod, the Tyrannosaurus Rex contained scars in places where the raptors from the first film would have scratched it. Over 700 of the films 998 shots involved dinosaurs. The Martian developed a new color algorithm, based on NASA shots of the Martian landscape, to transform the look of Earth to Mars without involving rotoscoping. It took much of the blue out of the sky, but left more in the landscape. The Walk Eighty-two percent of the movie involved VFX shots used to alter weather, turn Montreal streets in Paris and New York, and extend the World Trade Center tightrope set between them. They were able to achieve this on a $35 million budget using the Cloud instead of a rendering farm, cutting their rendering costs in half. Avengers: Age of Ultron Industrial Light and Magic redesigned the Hulk’s musculoskeletal structure, skin, and hair to control nuance and infuse more of a soul. ILM was one of 20 VFX companies working on this film. The Revenant Despite intense location shots, 122 minutes of the film incorporated VFX shots from 12 vendors in four countries, most notably for the bear mauling, but also to effect nuances like wind and lighting. In a nod to director Alejandro Iñárritu’s exacting nature, VFX production supervisor Rich McBride joked, "This presentation is almost as terrifying as showing Alejandro our shots." Star Wars: The Force Awakens used real locations and sets as much as possible, while integrating 2100 VFX and some half dozen film shots. "We wanted to evoke the feelings of one of the trilogy films, but create a film with its own forward motion," said ILM VFX supervisor Roger Guyett. Ex Machina’s VFX team was included early in the design process. "Body tracking was particularly difficult. It’s harder to track someone who’s not moving much," said VFX supervisor Andrew Whitehurst. "It was really helpful to have a director who could draw—we could sketch a lot of ideas out." Mad Max: Fury Road "Almost every shot that felt live action is real," said VFX supervisor Andrew Jackson, with most of the 2000 VFX shots in the film pertaining to the Citadel, crowd extensions, and landscapes. [UPDATE: The nominees are: Ex Machina, Mad Max:Fury Road, The Martian, The Revenant, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens; Ex Machina took home the gold.]


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

MarketStudyReport.com adds “Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Global Market Briefing 2016” new report to its research database. The report spread across 35 pages with table and figures in it. The tele production and post production services market comprises of establishments engaged in providing specialized services to motion pictures and videos, such as, animation, editing, adding subtitles, and crediting. Going forward, factors such as, technological advances and growing audience demand for superior audio visuals, are expected to drive the market. The Tele production And Other Postproduction Services Global Market Briefing provides strategists, marketers and senior management with the critical information they need to assess the tele production and other postproduction services sector. Description The Tele production And Other Postproduction Services Global Market Briefing Report from the Business Research Company covers market characteristics, size and growth, segmentation, regional breakdowns, competitive landscape, market shares, trends and strategies for this market. The market characteristics section of the report defines and explains the market. The market size section gives the tele production and other postproduction services market revenues, covering both the historic growth of the market and forecasting the future. Drivers and restraints looks at the external factors supporting and controlling the growth of the market. Market segmentations break down the key sub sectors which make up the market. The regional breakdowns section gives the size of the market geographically. Competitive landscape gives a description of the competitive nature of the market, market shares, and a description of the leading companies. Key financial deals which have shaped the market in the last three years are identified. The trends and strategies section highlights the likely future developments in the tele production and other postproduction services market and suggests approaches. Browse full table of contents and data tables at https://www.marketstudyreport.com/reports/tele-production-and-other-postproduction-services-global-market-briefing-2016/ Reasons to Purchase - Get up to date information available on the tele production and other postproduction services market globally. - Identify growth segments and opportunities. - Facilitate decision making on the basis of historic and forecast data and understand the drivers and restraints on the market. - Develop strategies based on likely future developments. - Gain a global perspective on the development of the market. - Report will be updated with the latest data and delivered to you within 3-5 working days of order. Scope Markets Covered: Editing, Tape Transfers, Subtitling, Crediting, Closed Captioning, Animation, Special Effects Companies Mentioned: Industrial Light and Magic, Technicolor, Double Negative, Digital Domain, Weta Digital, Framestore, Imageworks, Rhythm and Hues, Deluxe Entertainment Services Group, Mr X Inc., The Third Floor, Pixar, DreamWorks, Blue Sky Geographic scope: Americas, Europe, Asia, Middle East and Africa, Oceania. Time series: Five years historic and forecast. Data: Market value in $ billions. Data segmentations: Regional breakdowns, market share of competitors, key sub segments. Sourcing and Referencing: Data and analysis throughout the report is sourced using end notes. The tele production and post production services market comprises of establishments engaged in providing specialized services to motion pictures and videos, such as, animation, editing, adding subtitles, and crediting. Going forward, factors such as, technological advances and growing audience demand for superior audio visuals, are expected to drive the market. The Americas was the x largest geographic region in the tele production and other postproduction services market in 2015, accounting for $x billion or x% of the global market. Asia was the x largest geographic market, accounting for $x billion or x% of the global market. Europe was the x largest geographic market, accounting for $x billion or x% of the global market. The Middle East and Africa accounted for x% and $x billion, while Oceania accounted for x% of the global tele production and other postproduction services market. Growth In Animation Outsourcing The global outsourcing of VFX (Visual Effects) and CG (Computer Graphics) animation is growing rapidly as movie production companies are looking for cost effective production options to reduce overall expenditures. Almost all American and European TV, film and commercial production companies are looking at least outsourcing bits and pieces of VFX and CG work to low cost countries such as India, South Korea and Philippines. For instance, the average animation production cost in India is one-fourth of North America and about 35% lower than countries such as Korea and Philippines. To receive personalized assistance write to us @ [email protected] with the report title in the subject line along with your questions or call us at +1 866-764-2150


The Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Market report covers market characteristics, size and growth, segmentation, regional and country breakdowns, competitive landscape, market shares, trends and strategies for this market. It traces the market’s historic and forecast market growth by geography. It places the market within the context of the wider Tele production and Other Postproduction Services market, and compares it with other sectors. The tele production and post production services market comprises of establishments engaged in providing specialized services to motion pictures and videos, such as, animation, editing, adding subtitles, and crediting. Going forward, factors such as, technological advances and growing audience demand for superior audio visuals, are expected to drive the market. Browse more detail information about Tele production and Other Postproduction Services at: http://www.absolutereports.com/tele-production-and-other-postproduction-services-global-market-briefing-2016-10275841 The Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Market Report answers the following questions: Where is the largest and fastest growing market for Tele production and Other Postproduction Services ? How does the market relate to the overall economy, demography and other similar markets? What forces will shape the market going forward? Keyplayers in Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Global Market Analytics Report 2016 Get a PDF Sample of Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Research Report at: http://www.absolutereports.com/enquiry/request-sample/10275841 The Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Market report competitive landscape gives a description of the competitive nature of the market, market shares, and a description of the leading companies. And its key financial deals which have shaped the market in recent years are identified. Scope of Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Market Report: Companies Mentioned: Industrial Light and Magic, Technicolor, Double Negative, Digital Domain, Weta Digital, Framestore, Imageworks, Rhythm and Hues, Deluxe Entertainment Services Group, Mr X Inc., The Third Floor, Pixar, DreamWorks, Blue Sky Sourcing and Referencing: Data and analysis throughout the report is sourced using end notes. • Get up to date information available on the specialized design services market globally. • Facilitate decision making on the basis of historic and forecast data and understand the drivers and restraints on the market. • Gain a global perspective on the development of the market. Get Discount on Tele production and Other Postproduction Services Research Report at: http://www.absolutereports.com/enquiry/request-discount/10275841 Need more details about this Report, ask our expert @ http://www.absolutereports.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/10275841 Absolute Reports is an upscale platform to help key personnel in the business world in strategizing and taking visionary decisions based on facts and figures derived from in-depth market research. We are one of the top report resellers in the market dedicated towards bringing you an ingenious concoction of data parameters.


News Article | November 13, 2015
Site: phys.org

The original 1977 movie—which introduced the world to Luke Skywalker, Darth Vader and a mysterious power known as The Force—changed the way science-fiction films were made, paving the way for innovations in the field. "It woke up the visual effects industry," Mike Fink, a Hollywood effects heavyweight who won an Oscar in 2008 for his work on "The Golden Compass," said of the first film. "One of the things that's always been true in films is that the story drives the technology. It took a film like 'Star Wars'" to show that, Fink told AFP. The script for the first film set "in a galaxy far, far away" confronted creator George Lucas with seemingly insurmountable technical challenges. "With 'Star Wars', I want to do an action picture. I want to do something where I can pan the space ship. I want to do quick cuts. There's a lot of rhythm, a lot of pace," Lucas recalled in a documentary several years ago. "There's a lot of movement on the screen. I want it to be very cinematic, and at that point in time, that was impossible," he added. The creative impasse led him in 1975 to found Industrial Light and Magic (ILM), devoted to modernizing the special effects industry's techniques. The company is now the standard-bearer in the sector. A group of young engineers and students worked day and night in a warehouse north of Los Angeles, letting their imaginations run wild. Engineers worked with mock-ups and miniatures to bring to life the space epic that Lucas had envisioned. They experimented and came up with new animation, photography and graphics techniques that resulted in cutting-edge effects. Among the most revolutionary breakthroughs was the computer-controlled robotic "Dykstraflex" camera system. Named for its lead developer, John Dykstra, it allowed for seven axes of motion and the creation of flawlessly synchronized composite images—fantastic for those memorable space battle scenes. Dykstra and his team landed an Oscar for best visual effects. For Fink, the first "Star Wars" film "really revolutionized things by (having) machines operate other machines and using that to control cameras that make pictures." The adventures of Skywalker and Han Solo opened the door to a golden age in science-fiction filmmaking, a decade that included "Alien," "Blade Runner," "The Terminator," "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial" and "Back to the Future." Later on, "Jurassic Park," "Titanic," "Independence Day" and "Avatar" from directors such as Steven Spielberg and James Cameron pushed the boundaries of what could be achieved. In 1999, "Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace," also written and directed by Lucas, made new headway in technological achievement. The team had a rough time recreating the surface of the planet Tatooine. At the time, standard operating procedures would have been to make giant models, or matte paintings. But neither was good enough. In the end, it came down to a method that blended real photography and digital graphics—a technique that would later be used by Cameron to bring to life the world of Pandora in "Avatar." Now, the industry is watching closely to see what innovations director J.J. Abrams will bring to the table in "Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens" opening around the world next month. Die-hard fans are hoping for major surprises, but so far, trailers for the film have given little away in terms of the special effects to come. "I don't know if he's going to revolutionize the way visual effects are created," Anthony Breznican, an Entertainment Weekly critic and Star Wars expert, said of Abrams. "He's trying to go back to the way they were used to be made. I think really what he's doing is taking glossy state-of-the-art digital technology and giving it a sense of realism and texture that the old models used to have," he told AFP. The suspense will be over for fans in mid-December. Fink however cautions: "If you don't care about the characters, it doesn't matter how good the effects are." Explore further: Star Wars saga to go 3-D in new release


News Article | February 26, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

"La La Land", "Arrival" and "Manchester by the Sea" might be slugging it out for multiple Oscars, but they're not the only contenders at the 89th Academy Awards this Sunday. A handful of sci-fi and fantasy films have made the shortlist for best visual effects, recognising the cutting-edge movie magic that made our eyes pop in 2016. Will the award be rigged in favour of "Deepwater Horizon"? Can "Doctor Strange" conjure Marvel's first Oscar? Perhaps the bear necessities will come to "The Jungle Book", or maybe "Kubo and the Two Strings" will string out a win. Or will "Rogue One" prove a force to be reckoned with? And the nominees are... It's easy to assume modern visual effects are all achieved at the click of a mouse, but sometimes you have to go old school. So for this true-life tale of a horrifying disaster on a Gulf of Mexico oil rig, the filmmakers built a vast tank of water in a Louisiana parking lot and plonked in a huge model of the Deepwater Horizon rig, 85 percent of the size of the real thing. Industrial Light and Magic then added digital pyrotechnics using Plume, the company's own Oscar-winning software for generating flames and smoke. What are the odds? The combination of a big set with modern effects to tell a story of real-life heroism makes this feel like a solid Oscar-worthy effort, but it lacks the wow factor of other entrants. While rivals like "Deepwater Horizon" and "The Jungle Book" are all about whipping up perfect re-creations of reality, Marvel's "Doctor Strange" throws out the concept of reality entirely. ILM (again) led the effects companies transferring the psychedelic visions of legendary Marvel artist Steve Ditko to the big screen, creating what is simply one of the most visually spectacular movies ever. Where other groundbreaking effects extravaganzas like "The Matrix" or "Inception" lean heavily on one or two big showpiece effects, "Doctor Strange" busts out a new eye-popping gimmick in every action sequence. Whether it's cities being turned inside out, a fight sequence unspooling backward, or kaleidoscopic astral planes where the rules of reality simply don't exist, this flick is a dazzling cavalcade of gorgeousness to make your head spin. What are the odds? Marvel has been Oscar-nominated six times in past years for visual effects, but it's never won. If any film deserves to break that streak and claim the Marvel Cinematic Universe's first Academy Award, it's the frankly jaw-dropping "Doctor Strange". The "Jungle Book" effects team spent weeks in the jungles of India studying leaves, trees and moss to build a computer-generated jungle strewn with millions of CG leaves and twigs. Young actor Neel Sethi was then integrated into the digital jungle where he interacted with CGI animals. Elements of Christopher Walken's distinctive visage were incorporated into the character of chief ape King Louie, created by effects experts Weta. The wizards at MPC created the rest of the animal characters, sometimes drawing on the facial cues of the all-star cast, which included Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. "Our teams took a lot of time looking at videos of animals and studied their biology in order to capture their likeness," MPC's Adam Valdez explains. "Artists at MPC are anatomy specialists, sculptors, students of physics and actors. You need all of these skills to construct, then animate, then render a realistic animal." What are the odds? "The Jungle Book" celebrates and updates a classic movie for the modern age, and that's the sort of thing the Academy loves. Bit of an odd one, this. The delightful fairy tale "Kubo and the Two Strings" is nominated for best animated feature -- alongside out-and-out cartoons -- and for best visual effects, alongside live action films. It's the second such animated movie to also be nominated for VFX, after "The Nightmare Before Christmas". That's because it's a stop-motion production, employing physical puppets and sets that were then embellished with CGI effects. "There are some shots that are entirely practical," director Travis Knight told me when "Kubo" was released. "There are shots that are almost entirely CG. And then there are some shots that are blended." The puppets are created by production company Laika using cutting-edge techniques such as stereoscopic photography, laser-cutting, 3D printing and rapid prototyping. The scale of the models can be seen in the film's closing titles, which show the filmmakers working on a skeleton demon standing 18 feet (5.5 meters) tall and weighing 400 pounds (180 kilograms). What are the odds? This enchanting and beautifully crafted fairy tale richly deserves the recognition -- and, hey, with two nominations it's got two chances to take home a statuette. The effects of "Rogue One" are all about grounding the fantastic in gritty reality. The filmmakers drew on photos of real war zones to create verisimilitude in the battle scenes -- and I mean they literally drew on them, photoshopping Imperial Stormtroopers and Rebel X-Wings onto images from the Vietnam War. One of the highlights of the film is the snippy droid K-2SO, a CGI creation built around a motion captured performance by Alan Tudyk. The actor wore 13-inch stilts to create the droid's hulking form. More controversially, the film used computers to digitally re-create the character of Grand Moff Tarkin from 1977's "A New Hope" -- despite the fact that star Peter Cushing died more than 20 years ago. A CG model of Cushing's face was mapped onto a performance by actor Guy Henry, with controversial results. Some viewers found the digital performance jarring, while critics questioned the ethics of resurrecting a deceased performer. What are the odds? It's tempting to see the computerised Cushing as a watershed in movie history. If the Academy rewards the digital grave-robbing in "Rogue One," it could be seen as acceptance of the use of CGI to resurrect even more dead stars in future. For sheer dazzling imagery, it has to be "Doctor Strange". But visual effects are more than just creating a beautiful image -- they're about furthering a story and bringing characters to life. That brings us to "Kubo" and "The Jungle Book", two films blurring the lines between what's considered an animated or live action film. "Kubo" creator Laika has been nominated several times, so we'd fancy it's about time they took home a gong, but the Academy could well follow the example set by the Visual Effects Society's awards and be charmed by the old-school appeal of "Jungle Book". Update: And the winner is... "The Jungle Book"! Here's how cutting-edge technology helped the "Jungle Book"'s herd of animated animals win the day. Tech Culture: From film and television to social media and games, here's your place for the lighter side of tech. Batteries Not Included: The CNET team shares experiences that remind us why tech stuff is cool.


News Article | June 28, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

The model of the Star Trek starship USS Enterprise, which has been featured prominently at the Smithsonian's basement gift shop, is about to be beamed up to the central atrium on Tuesday, June 28, as part of the upcoming celebration of the museum's 40th birthday. Malcolm Collum, a conservator for the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, explained that they decided to showcase the Enterprise replica in recognition of the historical significance it had gained over the years. The Star Trek starship model was donated by Paramount Studios to the museum in 1974, back when Star Trek was simply a short-lived television series. However, just when the show started to gain popularity among sci-fi fans, the Enterprise replica started to show several structural failures and was already falling apart. Some of the housings for the Enterprise's engine, known as nacelles, have started to sag, while the paint job on the model were also beginning to flake. This spurred Collum to transfer the starship to the museum's conservation laboratory for some much needed repairs in 2014. Collum and his colleagues were able to restore the USS Enterprise to resemble its original form back in 1967, when it was used during the filming of the Star Trek episode, "Trouble with Tribbles." They made use of stills and photographs from old episodes in order to get the look of the original. This was the first time the replica received modifications for close to 50 years. Some of the modifications to the starship Enterprise Collum and his team made include applying a fresh coat of green-gray paint to return it to its original color, replacing old incandescent bulbs with LEDs that won't cause any fires when turned on and adding an authentic deflector dish to replace the one that was missing when the replica was donated in 1974. "When you turn on the lights, it just brings the ship to life," Collum pointed out. "It's an incredible transformation." The Smithsonian also collaborated with Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) visual effects studio to add details to the Enterprise to make it look more like an authentic starship that has traveled through space for years. ILM placed streaks and specks of bronze paint to its exterior, as well as letterings on the side of the starship using the same technology used to make the original markers on the model. The USS Enterprise is one of the many aerospace and aviation models set to be featured during the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's birthday celebration. The museum will stay open all night on Friday, July 1, to allow visitors to stargaze at the Smithsonian's observatory, view space-themed films and even participate in scavenger hunts organized by the museum. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Yu J.,Industrial Light and Magic | Wojtan C.,IST Austria | Turk G.,Georgia Institute of Technology | Yap C.,New York University
Computer Graphics Forum | Year: 2012

We introduce the idea of using an explicit triangle mesh to track the air/fluid interface in a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator. Once an initial surface mesh is created, this mesh is carried forward in time using nearby particle velocities to advect the mesh vertices. The mesh connectivity remains mostly unchanged across time-steps; it is only modified locally for topology change events or for the improvement of triangle quality. In order to ensure that the surface mesh does not diverge from the underlying particle simulation, we periodically project the mesh surface onto an implicit surface defined by the physics simulation. The mesh surface gives us several advantages over previous SPH surface tracking techniques. We demonstrate a new method for surface tension calculations that clearly outperforms the state of the art in SPH surface tension for computer graphics. We also demonstrate a method for tracking detailed surface information (like colors) that is less susceptible to numerical diffusion than competing techniques. Finally, our temporally-coherent surface mesh allows us to simulate highresolution surface wave dynamics without being limited by the particle resolution of the SPH simulation. © 2012 The Author(s).


Yu J.,Industrial Light and Magic | Turk G.,Georgia Institute of Technology
ACM Transactions on Graphics | Year: 2013

In this article we present a novel surface reconstruction method for particlebased fluid simulators such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. In particle-based simulations, fluid surfaces are usually defined as a level set of an implicit function. We formulate the implicit function as a sum of anisotropic smoothing kernels, and the direction of anisotropy at a particle is determined by performing Principal Component Analysis (PCA) over the neighboring particles. In addition, we perform a smoothing step that repositions the centers of these smoothing kernels. Since these anisotropic smoothing kernels capture the local particle distributions more accurately, our method has advantages over existing methods in representing smooth surfaces, thin streams, and sharp features of fluids. Our method is fast, easy to implement, and our results demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of reconstructed surfaces as compared to existing methods. © 2013 ACM.


Bhat K.S.,Industrial Light and Magic | Goldenthal R.,Industrial Light and Magic | Ye Y.,Industrial Light and Magic | Mallet R.,Industrial Light and Magic | Koperwas M.,Industrial Light and Magic
Proceedings - SCA 2013: 12th ACM SIGGRAPH / Eurographics Symposium on Computer Animation | Year: 2013

Human beings are naturally sensitive to subtle cues in facial expressions, especially in areas of the eyes and mouth. Current facial motion capture methods fail to accurately reproduce motions in those areas due to multiple limitations. In this paper, we present a new performance capture method that focuses on the perceptually important contour features on the face. Additionally, the output of our two-step optimization scheme is also easily editable by an animator. To illustrate the strength of our system, we present a retargeting application that incorporates primary contour lines to map a performance with lip-sync from an actor to a creature.


Li H.,Industrial Light and Magic | Li H.,University of Southern California | Yu J.,Industrial Light and Magic | Ye Y.,Industrial Light and Magic | Bregler C.,Industrial Light and Magic
ACM Transactions on Graphics | Year: 2013

We introduce a real-time and calibration-free facial performance capture framework based on a sensor with video and depth input. In this framework, we develop an adaptive PCA model using shape correctives that adjust on-the-fly to the actor's expressions through incremental PCA-based learning. Since the fitting of the adaptive model progressively improves during the performance, we do not require an extra capture or training session to build this model. As a result, the system is highly deployable and easy to use: it can faithfully track any individual, starting from just a single face scan of the subject in a neutral pose. Like many real-time methods, we use a linear subspace to cope with incomplete input data and fast motion. To boost the training of our tracking model with reliable samples, we use a well-trained 2D facial feature tracker on the input video and an efficient mesh deformation algorithm to snap the result of the previous step to high frequency details in visible depth map regions. We show that the combination of dense depth maps and texture features around eyes and lips is essential in capturing natural dialogues and nuanced actor-specific emotions. We demonstrate that using an adaptive PCA model not only improves the fitting accuracy for tracking but also increases the expressiveness of the retargeted character. Copyright © ACM 2013.

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