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West Lafayette, IN, United States

Ji Y.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Nantung T.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Tompkins B.,INDOT Highway Management | Harris D.,INDOT Office of Research and Development
Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering | Year: 2013

Over the years, the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) has changed its emphasis from construction to preservation of public highways. As such, there is great interest in assessing cost efficacy of a pavement preservation strategy. This paper aims to present the functional and structural benefits of microsurfacing applications at highway sections in Indiana. To achieve this goal, comprehensive monitoring and data analysis was performed using the pavement condition rating (PCR), structure number (SN), and surface roughness [international roughness index (IRI)] for in situ performance evaluation. According to the deflection and roughness analysis, an improvement was observed in SN and IRI during the early life of the pavement. Furthermore, no significant difference was obtained over the following 2 years. Application of the microsurfacing resulted in a significant rise in PCR and SN and decline in IRI. A similar result was found at the resurfacing site. Pavement with microsurface sections had stable roughness with only a 2-point increase every year. The two control sections (SR-68 and SR-145) have had 4-point increases on average. The IRI for SR-58 resurfacing was 762 mm/km (48 in./mi) in 2009 (after construction), which is almost half of the 2008 (before construction) IRI value. The rates of decline of the SN and IRI were no different statistically for untreated control sections, and the rate of decline of the PCR was slightly higher than in the pavement preservation project, including resurfacing and microsurfacing. The cost study indicated that microsurfacing would be deemed cost effective if it could provide more than 1.6 years of service life, and resurfacing would be cost effective if it could provide more than 3 years of service life. Considering cost as well as performance, pavement preservation should be an effective strategy to eliminate or retard damage. If applied properly, microsurfacing is an economical alternative to conventional resurfacing. The case study results demonstrate that microsurfacing is a costeffectiveness treatment in addressing pavement distresses and in extending pavement life in general. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Ji R.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Nantung T.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Siddiki N.,INDOT Materials and Testing | Liao T.,Purdue University | Kim D.,Chosun University
Journal of Testing and Evaluation | Year: 2015

This paper presents a comparison study of the experimental results from the falling weight deflectometer (FWD) test and laboratory resilient modulus test on granular subgrade materials and its application in flexible pavement design. Field and laboratory testing programs were conducted to develop a practical methodology for estimating resilient modulus (Mr) values of subgrade soils for use in the design of pavement structures. Soil characterization database was established for lab testing. A multiple regression model can be used to predict Mr value using several factors including soil properties, soil type and state of stresses for three popular American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) soil types (A-4, A-6, and A-7-6) in Indiana, and these prediction models developed were verified compared with laboratory Mr tests with high R2 value. In situ Mr seasonal variation based on abundant FWD test data in five field testing sites spread in Indiana was conducted in order to find the correlation between resilient modulus, temperature, and precipitation for the period from 2006 to 2012. The proposed method can accurately predict subgrade Mr of lab testing. However results from lab testing are significantly lower than recommended range by mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) and back-calculation one using an adjust factor of 3. The design examples showed that the seasonal variation of temperature and precipitation as well as traffic can affect the design thickness by as much as 15 to 20 % in general. The findings of this study are expected to be helpful in the implementation of the pavement design in Indiana and elsewhere. Copyright by ASTM Int'l (all rights reserved). Source


Ji R.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Siddiki N.,INDOT Materials and Testing | Nantung T.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Kim D.,Chosun University
The Scientific World Journal | Year: 2014

In order to implement MEPDG hierarchical inputs for unbound and subgrade soil, a database containing subgrade MR, index properties, standard proctor, and laboratory MR for 140 undisturbed roadbed soil samples from six different districts in Indiana was created. The MR data were categorized in accordance with the AASHTO soil classifications and divided into several groups. Based on each group, this study develops statistical analysis and evaluation datasets to validate these models. Stress-based regression models were evaluated using a statistical tool (analysis of variance (ANOVA)) and Z-test, and pertinent material constants (k1, k2 and k3) were determined for different soil types. The reasonably good correlations of material constants along with MR with routine soil properties were established. Furthermore, FWD tests were conducted on several Indiana highways in different seasons, and laboratory resilient modulus tests were performed on the subgrade soils that were collected from the falling weight deflectometer (FWD) test sites. A comparison was made of the resilient moduli obtained from the laboratory resilient modulus tests with those from the FWD tests. Correlations between the laboratory resilient modulus and the FWD modulus were developed and are discussed in this paper. © 2014 Richard Ji et al. Source


Ji Y.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Nantung T.,INDOT Office of Research and Development | Tompkins B.,NDOT Highway Management
International Journal of Pavement Research and Technology | Year: 2015

State highway agencies are facing immense pressure to maintain roads at acceptable levels for drivers amidst challenging financial and economic situations. Pavement preservation has been sought as a potential alternative for managing the pavement assets. This paper aims to present the functional and structural benefits of the Ultrathin Bonded Wearing Course (UTBWC) applications as a pavement preservation strategy on highway sections in Indiana. To achieve this goal, comprehensive monitoring and data analysis were performed using the Pavement Condition Rating (PCR), Structural Number (SN), and International Roughness Index (IRI) for in situ performance evaluation on UTBWC and the four control sections (SR-58, SR-69, SR-68, and SR-145). The cost study indicated that UTBWC would be deemed cost-effective if it could provide more than 3.6 years of service life, and resurfacing would be deemed cost-effective if it could provide more than 3 years of service life. The study results demonstrate that UTBWC is not as cost effective as resurfacing; however UTBWC can still address pavement distresses and can extend pavement life in general. © Chinese Society of Pavement Engineering. Source

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