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Ragavan P.,Institute of Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding | Mohan P.M.,Pondicherry University | Sxaena A.,Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy | Prasanth R.S.,Institute of Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding | Saravanan S.,Institute of Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding
Biodiversitas | Year: 2014

Sonneratia lanceolata, Sonneratia x urama and Sonneratia x gulngai was collected from Great Nicobar Island, which representing a new addition to the mangrove flora of India. S. lanceolata is distinguished from S. caseolaris by its drooping branches, lanceolate leaves and ovoidal bud without medial constriction. S. x urama and S. x gulngai are putative hybrids. S. x urama is putative hybrid between S. alba and S. lanceolata, whereas S. x gulngai is putative hybrid between S. alba and S. caseolaris. A detailed description along with colour plate and relevant notes is provided for further collection and identification of these species in the field. © 2014, Society for Indonesian Biodiversity. All rights reserved.


Qayum A.,Jawaharlal Nehru University | Qayum A.,Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy | Arya R.,Jawaharlal Nehru University | Kumar P.,Nepalganj Medical College | Lynn A.M.,Jawaharlal Nehru University
Malaria Journal | Year: 2015

Background: Malaria is a major health problem in the tropical and subtropical world. In India, 95% of the population resides in malaria endemic regions and it is major public health problem in most parts of the country. The present work has developed malaria maps by integrating socio-economic, epidemiology and geographical dimensions of three eastern districts of Uttar Pradesh, India. The area has been studied in each dimension separately, and later integrated to find a list of vulnerable pockets/villages, called as malarial hotspots. Methods: The study has been done at village level. Seasonal variation of malaria, comparison of epidemiology indices and progress of the medical facility were studied. Ten independent geographical information system (GIS) maps of socio-economic aspects (population, child population, literacy, and work force participation), epidemiology (annual parasitic index (API) and slides collected and examined) and geographical features (settlement, forest cover, water bodies, rainfall, relative humidity, and temperature) were drawn and studied. These maps were overlaid based on computed weight matrix to find malarial hotspot. Results: It was found that the studied dimensions were inter-weaving factors for malaria epidemic and closely affected malaria situations as evidenced from the obtained correlation matrix. The regions with water logging, high rainfall and proximity to forest, along with poor socio-economic conditions, are primarily hotspot regions. The work is presented through a series of GIS maps, tables, figures and graphs. A total of 2,054 out of 8,973 villages studied were found to be malarial hotspots and consequently suggestions were made to the concerned government malaria offices. Conclusion: With developing technology, information tools such as GIS, have captured almost every field of scientific research especially of vector-borne diseases, such as malaria. Malarial mapping enables easy update of information and effortless accessibility of geo-referenced data to policy makers to produce cost-effective measures for malaria control in endemic regions. © 2015 Qayum et al.; licensee BioMed Central.


Das D.J.,Arid forest Research Institute | Saxena A.,Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy | Roy P.S.,Indian Institute of Remote Sensing | Roy P.S.,University of Hyderabad
Tropical Ecology | Year: 2016

The present study aims at estimating above ground woody forest biomass carbon stock of Kolasib district, Mizoram based on both ‘planimetric’ as well as ‘surface area’. Surface area is the actual available area for plants and animals of a region for their establishment and development. Geo-referenced orthorectified satellite image (Landsat ETM+) of the year 2001 was classified following hybrid method. The planimetric classified map was then integrated with slope map to get the surface area of each land use/cover. The planimetric area of Kolasib district is 1,382 km2, whereas surface area was estimated as 1,490 km2. The total above ground woody biomass carbon estimated as per planimetric and surface area were 2,404 and 2,587 thousand tonne, respectively with a net difference of 183 thousand tonne. This study, therefore, accentuates the surface area based estimation of biomass carbon in regional and global scale to understand the forestry options to mitigate climate change. © International Society for Tropical Ecology.


Ragavan P.,Pondicherry University | Saxena A.,Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy | Jayaraj R.S.C.,Arid forest Research Institute | Ravichandran K.,Haddo | And 2 more authors.
Botanica Marina | Year: 2015

A recent floristic survey revealed the occurrence of three species of Xylocarpus in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. Of these, Xylocarpus granatum and X. moluccensis are true mangrove species, whereas X. rumphii is a non-mangrove species. All three Xylocarpus species were recorded from the Andaman Islands, but none of them have been recorded from the Nicobar Islands. The key distinguishing characters of X. granatum, X. moluccensis and X. rumphii are described to resolve the nomenclatural ambiguity of Xylocarpus spp. in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. © 2015 by De Gruyter 2015.


Ragavan P.,Pondicherry University | Saxena A.,Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy | Mohan P.M.,Pondicherry University | Jayaraj R.S.C.,Arid forest Research Institute
Biodiversitas | Year: 2015

A recent floristic survey revealed the occurrence of three species of Acanthus in mangroves of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. Of these Acanthus ilicifolius and A. ebracteatus are shrubs, whereas A. volubilis is a climbing shrub. All the three Acanthus species were recorded from the Andaman Islands, but only A. ilicifolius from the Nicobar Islands. A. volubilis is easily distinguished from other two species by its unarmed and twining with delicate sprawling stems, un-serrated elliptical leaves, white corolla and absence of bracteoles. A. ilicifolius and A. ebracteatus are differentiated based on the presence and absences of bracteoles, corolla color, and position of Inflorescence and direction of stem axial spines. A key for the species of Acanthus of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands is also provided. © 2015 Society for Indonesian Biodiversity. All rights reserved.

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