Gary, IN, United States

Indiana University Northwest

www.iun.edu
Gary, IN, United States

Indiana University Northwest is a regional university campus in the Indiana University system in Gary, Indiana, USA, established in 1963. Wikipedia.


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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Indiana CPA Society's statewide annual CPA Day of Service was Friday, Sept. 23. In 2003, INCPAS was the first state CPA society to implement a Day of Service for volunteers working for CPA firms, businesses that employ CPAs and students majoring in accounting at Indiana colleges. Participants have since completed 514 service projects. This year alone, teams from these 34 companies completed 41 service projects in 19 Indiana towns: A.C.T. Services, Inc., Alerding CPA Group, BGBC Partners, LLP, Blue & Co. LLC, Brown, Smith & Settle, LLC, CPAs, Bucheri McCarty & Metz LLP, Business-Matrimonial Valuation Services, LLC, CFO to GO LLC, CliftonLarsonAllen LLP, Crowe Horwath LLP, Dauby O'Connor & Zaleski, LLC, Estep - Doctor & Company, P.C., Geer CPA & Consulting PC, Girardot, Strauch, & Co., Grace College Advanced Accounting Class, Heath CPA & Associates, Indiana Wesleyan University Accounting Club, Insight Accounting Group, Indiana University Northwest, Judy M. Zell, CPA, Kemper CPA Group LLP, Lemler Group, LM Henderson & Co., London Witte Group, LLC, mAccounting, Martin University, McMahon & Associates CPAs, P.C., RBSK Partners PC, Sherck Hussey Johnson & McNaughton, Sikich LLP, Somerset CPAs and Advisors, Swartz Retson & Co., P.C., Vincennes University and Whitinger & Company LLC. Among the areas served were Carmel, Columbus, Evansville, Gary, Goshen, Greensburg, Highland, Indianapolis, Lafayette, Marion, Merrillville, Mishawaka, Muncie, Munster, South Bend, Terre Haute, Vincennes and Winona Lake. Service projects included home builds, landscaping and environmental clean up, playgrounds, safe havens, food pantries, schools, children's museums, therapy foundations, golf fundraisers and animal shelters. Nearly 8,100 CPAs in public practice, business and industry, government and education are members of the Indiana CPA Society. INCPAS is the most trusted business resource and advocate in Indiana. Its members are required to abide by the CPA profession's code of conduct. INCPAS members also receive access to quality educational programs and peer networking for knowledge sharing. Society members are trusted advisors to Indiana's business community. INCPAS celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2015. For more information, visit incpas.org.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

E. Davis-Banks grew up in a neighborhood where everyone knew each other and looked out for each other. For her, that provided stability and a safe environment not only for her but for her neighbors and fellow kids at that time. With the passion to awaken in most urban neighborhoods the good rapport and support system she grew up with, she writes “My Street, My Friends” (published by AuthorHouse), a touching story how a support block for children will lead these kids to have a straight path in life and a stable environment to live in. This is a story about how neighbors support the children while they are preparing for a scooter competition that is being held at the neighborhood community center. Through the lives of four children - Dee, Robert, Helen and Lance who grew up together on the same street – readers will see a story of resilience. Their interactions highlight how their neighborhood plays an important role in their lives and their families’ lives. With her experiences as a kid and a social worker as an adult, the author is able to effectively point out that with sound, stable and safe neighborhoods, there are no rooms for trouble. If everyone knows everyone on their block, and the children are known by all, it helps develop a better community. “I am hoping this bright story will appeal to those who live in neighborhoods in the inner city,” Davis-Banks says. “And I am hoping reading this will make all ages think about improving relationships with neighbors on their block. To see stable neighborhoods means seeing safe and stable environments.” “My Street, My Friends” By E. Davis-Banks Hardcover | 6 x 9in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781524621834 Softcover | 6 x 9in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781524621827 E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781524621810 Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble About the Author E. Davis-Banks is an author and poet born in Spokane, Washington. At the age of 6, she then moved to Gary, Indiana, where she resided until adulthood. In 1983, she moved to Minnesota, where she currently lives in the city of Plymouth. She has two adult sons. She received her bachelor’s of arts degree from Indiana University Northwest (1979). She majored in sociology. She also received her master’s degree in social work from the University of Minnesota (1996), majoring in child welfare. Her hobbies include music (R & B and smooth jazz) and working with flowers (her parents owned a flower shop in Gary, Indiana). Davis-Banks loves to write both fiction and nonfiction. Now retires, she spends her time enjoying her dream of writing for readers’ enjoyment. AuthorHouse, an Author Solutions, Inc. self-publishing imprint, is a leading provider of book publishing, marketing, and bookselling services for authors around the globe and offers the industry’s only suite of Hollywood book-to-film services. Committed to providing the highest level of customer service, AuthorHouse assigns each author personal publishing and marketing consultants who provide guidance throughout the process. Headquartered in Bloomington, Indiana, AuthorHouse celebrated 15 years of service to authors in Sept. 2011.For more information or to publish a book visit authorhouse.com or call 1-888-519-5121. For the latest, follow @authorhouse on Twitter.


Schulze-Halberg A.,Indiana University Northwest
European Physical Journal Plus | Year: 2013

We prove that iterations of confluent supersymmetric transformations (confluent SUSY chains) in quantum mechanics can be represented through Wronskian determinants. It is further shown that the latter Wronskian representation remains valid, if the SUSY chain is built from arbitrary combinations of confluent and non-confluent subchains. In addition, we obtain an integral representation of generalized eigenfunctions for quantum-mechanical Hamiltonians that proves useful for the application of confluent SUSY chains. Our results generalize former findings for second- and third-order chains. © Società Italiana di Fisica / Springer-Verlag 2013.


Morris J.R.,Indiana University Northwest
General Relativity and Gravitation | Year: 2011

Effects of a 4d dilaton field on a falling test mass are examined from the Einstein frame perspective of scalar-tensor theory. Results are obtained for the centripetal acceleration of particles in circular orbits, and the radial acceleration for particles with pure radial motion. These results are applied to the specific case of nonrelativistic motion in the weak field approximation of Brans-Dicke theory, employing the exact Xanthopoulos-Zannias solutions. For a given parameter range, the results obtained from Brans-Dicke theory are qualitatively dramatically different from those of general relativity. Comments are made concerning a comparison with the general relativistic results in the limit of an infinite Brans-Dicke parameter. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Sunsay C.,Indiana University Northwest | Rebec G.V.,Indiana University
Behavioral Neuroscience | Year: 2014

The prediction-error model of dopamine (DA) signaling has largely been confirmed with various appetitive Pavlovian conditioning procedures and has been supported in tests of Pavlovian extinction. Studies have repeatedly shown, however, that extinction does not erase the original memory of conditioning as the prediction-error model presumes, putting the model at odds with contemporary views that treat extinction as an episode of learning rather than unlearning of conditioning. Here, we combined fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) with appetitive Pavlovian conditioning to assess DA release directly during extinction and reinstatement. DA was monitored in the nucleus accumbens core, which plays a key role in reward processing. Following at least 4 daily sessions of 16 tone-food pairings, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was performed while rats received additional tone-food pairings followed by tone alone presentations (i.e., extinction). Acquisition memory was reinstated with noncontingent presentations of reward and then tested with cue presentation. Tone-food pairings produced transient (1- to 3-s) DA release in response to tone. During extinction, the amplitude of the DA response decreased significantly. Following presentation of 2 noncontingent food pellets, subsequent tone presentation reinstated the DA signal. Our results support the prediction-error model for appetitive Pavlovian extinction but not for reinstatement. © 2014 American Psychological Association.


Davis J.K.,Indiana University Northwest
Psychiatric Services | Year: 2013

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that predict job satisfaction among peer providers employed on professional treatment teams in community-based behavioral health agencies. Methods: Surveys via Internet and postal mail gathered data from 100 members of the National Association of Peer Specialists who met study criteria. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to evaluate role clarity, psychological empowerment, supervisory alliance, coworker support, and inclusion and exclusion in organizational processes as predictors of job satisfaction. Results: The regression analysis revealed that of the five predictors, role clarity and psychological empowerment were significant predictors of job satisfaction when analyses controlled for age, level of education, and tenure. Conclusions: The results of this study reveal that peer providers found satisfaction in an integrated work environment that included clearly defined roles, independent functioning, and respect for the expertise that peer providers possess.


Contreras-Astorga A.,Indiana University Northwest | Schulze-Halberg A.,Indiana University Northwest
Annals of Physics | Year: 2015

We show the relationship between the mathematical framework used in recent papers by Rosu etal. (2014) [1-3] and the second-order confluent supersymmetric quantum mechanics. In addition, we point out several immediate generalizations of the approach taken in the latter references. Furthermore, it is shown how to apply the generalized scheme to the Dirac and to the Fokker-Planck equation. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Morris J.R.,Indiana University Northwest
General Relativity and Gravitation | Year: 2012

Static spherically symmetric solutions of 4d Brans-Dicke theory include a set of naked singularity solutions. Dilatonic effects near the naked singularities result in either a shielding or an antishielding effect from intruding massive test particles. One result is that for a portion of the solution parameter space, no communication between the singularity and a distant observer is possible via massive particle exchanges. Kaluza-Klein gravity is considered as a special case. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Morris J.R.,Indiana University Northwest
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2014

Four-dimensional scalar-tensor theory is considered within two conformal frames, the Jordan frame (JF) and the Einstein frame (EF). The actions for the theory are equivalent and equations of motion can be obtained from each action. It is found that the JF equations of motion, expressed in terms of EF variables, translate directly into and agree with the EF equations of motion obtained from the EF action, provided that certain simple consistency conditions are satisfied, which is always the case. The implication is that a solution set obtained in one conformal frame can be reliably translated into a solution set for the other frame, and therefore the two frames are, at least, mathematically equivalent. © 2014 American Physical Society.


News Article | November 3, 2015
Site: phys.org

No one knew the holes under Mount Baldy existed until a six-year-old boy fell into one in the summer of 2013 and was buried. Emergency responders successfully rescued the boy after three and a half hours, but the accident left Indiana University Northwest coastal geologist Erin Argyilan, who was there at the time, struck by the concept that deep, stable holes could form and survive in loose sand. The subsequent study by Argyilan and her co-authors, which will be presented at the Geological Society of America meeting on Tuesday in Baltimore, Maryland, concludes that the holes formed when trees, buried by wind-blown sands, rotted away. A cement formed by fungi-produced minerals and chemical weathering lines the walls of the hole and temporarily maintains the branching shape of the tree hollows. "These are living systems. There is a real interaction between biologic and geologic properties," said Argyilan. "We have to look at these dunes with an interdisciplinary mindset or we will miss how the system works." Scientists know Mount Baldy is on the move. Geologists estimate that winds shift the crescent-shaped dune, which reaches 38 meters (126 feet) above the south shore of Lake Michigan, roughly 1.0-1.2 meters (3-4 feet) inland a year, although the actual movement is highly variable. Blowing sands overwhelm and bury vegetation, buildings and parking lots on the dune's windward side, and the tree hollows are being exhumed on the hill's leeward slope. To learn how Mount Baldy's holes formed, the team first had to find some holes. Park Service personnel spotted some, while the Indiana Geological Survey used ground-penetrating radar to search for others. Argyilan and her colleagues even found one or two using paintbrushes and trowels. At one point they even found a fungus-ridden oak limb that terminated in a tree-shaped hollow. "At that point, I was sold that we had trees being buried and decomposition driven by fungus," said Argyilan. "But I did not know why the holes would stay open." The scientists turned to scanning electron microscopy, which helps ascertain the surface texture and chemistry of minerals. Not only were the walls of the tunnels littered with hyphae, the equivalent of fungal roots, but they also were covered with a cementing mineral. Fungi were likely living inside the trees prior to the plants' burial. Once the trees were entombed, the fungi decomposed the tree, and the long-lasting cement maintained the structural integrity of the hollow even after the tree had decomposed, according to the study. The cement is a byproduct of the fungal decomposition process and the result of chemical weathering, but the scientists are still studying the precise biological and chemical pathways that form the cement. "The next step is to examine how involved the fungi are in creating the cement," said Argyilan. Since starting to explore Mount Baldy's holes, Argyilan has learned of similar holes in Oregon coast dunes and at two other locations along the Great Lakes. The Oregon dunes appear to have been caused by smaller trees compared to the oaks at Mount Baldy. "The oaks make significantly more hazardous holes," said Argyilan, "especially when you can't see them from the surface." Scientists have identified eleven holes on Mount Baldy, but Argyilan suspects they will find more as the dune migrates, partially the result of human activity in the area. A local harbor blocks sands from reaching the dune, while historic mining and tourists have eroded the dune's sandy slopes. Erosion has also increased during winter; shrinking lake ice—a product of climate change—does not protect the dune from winter winds as it has in the past. "What's happening at Mount Baldy is basically the perfect storm for destroying and reactivating [the movement of] a dune," said Argyilan. "Here, and in general, I think it is a real possibility that we will see more holes as more dunes are reactivated by human activity."

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